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Parthian Class 

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Submarine histories. Royal Navy Parthian class submarines. Submarine website dedicated to the history of HMS Parthian, HMS Perseus, HMS Phoenix, HMS Poseidon, HMS Proteus and HMS Pandora from their launch to their participation in major wars also notice board for families of ex-crew of Parthian Class submarines.

Apart form a different bow shape this class was very similar to the Odin class submarines 

Displacement: 1,475 Tons, Full Load 2,040 TONS.  Speed: 167.5 Knots surface speed and  9 Knots submerged. Crew 53  Armament :One 4 -inch Gun  2 machine Guns  (20mm Oerlikon )Eight 21 inch Torpedo Tubes (Six in the Bow and two in the Stern) After 1942 surviving submarines were altered to take 18 M2 mines which could be jettisoned form the torpedo Tubes 

Parthian 22nd June 1929 Lost on 11th August 1943. Presumed mined in the Adriatic
Perseus 22nd May 1929 Lost on 1st December 1941. torpedoed by Italian S/M Enrico Tuti off Zante on 
Phoenix 3rd October 1929 Lost on 17th July 1940.
Poseidon 21st June 1929 Lost on 9th June 1931.
Proteus 23rd July 1929 Scrapped in March 1946 at Troon.
Pandora 22nd August 1929 Lost on 31st March 1942, later salvaged and then scrapped 1955.
HMS Parthian

HMS Parthian built at Chatham Dockyard. and launched 22nd June 1929. saw service in the China Station until 1940 when she was transferred to the Mediterranean. HMS Parthian was lost on the 11th August 1943 presumed mined in the Adriatic

HMS Parthian off Chinese coast in the 1930s. She sank two submarines before being sunk herself.

A reproduction of this original photo / photo-postcard size 10" x 7" approx available.  Order photograph here  Walker Archive. Order Code  PHS173

HMS Parthian.

Original Wright & Logan Postcard.  Price 12.  Click here to order. SOLD 

HMS Parthian is thought to have been mined and sunk on 11th August 1943.

HMS Parthian

HMS Perseus

HMS Perseus built Vickers Armstrong at Barrow . and launched 22nd May 1929. saw service in the China Station until 1940 when she was transferred to the Mediterranean. HMS Perseus was torpedoed by Italian Submarine  Enrico Tuti off Zante on 1st December 1941

HMS Perseus at Wei Hai Wei in 1930s. She was mined on 6th December 1941, 1 survivor. 

A reproduction of this original photo / photo-postcard size 10" x 7" approx available.  Order photograph here  Walker Archive. Order Code  PHS174

HMS Perseus.

A reproduction of this original photo / photo-postcard size 10" x 7" approx available.  Order photograph here  Walker Archive. Order Code  PHS175

HMS Phoenix

HMS Phoenix c.1930s off China. She was lost on 16th July 1940. 

A reproduction of this original photo / photo-postcard size 10" x 7" approx available.  Order photograph here  Walker Archive. Order Code  PHS176

HMS Proteus

HMS Proteus off China c.1930s. 

A reproduction of this original photo / photo-postcard size 10" x 7" approx available.  Order photograph here  Walker Archive. Order Code  PHS177

HMS Proteus.

A reproduction of this original photo / photo-postcard size 10" x 7" approx available.  Order photograph here  Walker Archive. Order Code  PHS255

HMS Pandora

HMS Pandora off the Chinese coast in the 1930s. After sinking 5 ships she herself was sunk on 1st April 1942. 

A reproduction of this original photo / photo-postcard size 10" x 7" approx available.  Order photograph here  Walker Archive. Order Code  PHS178

The Launch of HMS Pandora.

A reproduction of this original photo / photo-postcard size 10" x 7" approx available.  Order photograph here  Walker Archive. Order Code  PHS305

 

ORIGINAL POSTCARD FOR SALE.  DONATED TOWARDS THE UPKEEP OF THIS SITE.

From left to right, HMS Proteus, HMS Pandora, HMS Poseidon and HMS Perseus, 1930.

Original Wright & Logan Postcard.  Price 15.  Click here to order.    Order Code  PHS182

Displacement: 1475 tons   Compliment: 53.    Armament: 8 x 21 inch torpedo tubes (6 bow, 2 stern, 14 torpedoes). One 4 inch quick-firing MkIV gun (later MkXII)    Speed: surface speed 17.5 knots, submerged speed 8.6 knots
 

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AVIATION PRINTS

Click above to see all of our aviation art index - Eight random half price aviation items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Aviation Art Offers

 A pair of P51D Mustangs of the 361st Fighter Group, 8th Air Force, escort a damaged B17G Flying Fortress of the 381st Bomb Group back to its home base of Ridgewell, England, during the Autumn of 1944.

Last One Home by Ivan Berryman. (F)
Half Price! - 100.00
 Almost every major invasion that took place in Europe in World War II began with para drops, and in almost every case the C-47 was the aircraft that delivered these elite fighting troops. Few C-47 pilots had more combat experience than Sid Harwell, seen flying his Dakota in this typical action scene, dropping airborne troops into occupied Europe soon after D-Day. No matter what resistance he encountered, the good C-47 pilot put his aircraft right over the Dropping Zone, every time.
Invasion Force by Nicolas Trudgian. (Y)
Half Price! - 40.00
In the Vietnam war Squadron VA-163 was stationed aboard the carrier Oriskany on its second cruise, the squadrons A-4 Skyhawks were led by Commander Wynn Foster, one of the navys most aggressive strike leaders, and under Air Wing Commander James Stockdale, the A-4 pilots racked up a formidable record as a top fighting unit.

Alfa-Strike by Nicolas Trudgian. (Y)
Half Price! - 75.00
 Boeing Chinook of No.7 Squadron (detachment) from RAF Aldergrove, flying on supply duty in the west of the province.

Chinook over the Sperrins by David Pentland.
Half Price! - 35.00

 Bristol Blenheim Mk.IVF of No.68 Squadron.  The night-fighter squadron flew Blenheims from mid1941 to early 1942 before converting to Beaufighters.  Aircraft WM-Z is shown in combat with a marauding Dornier Do17.

Blenheim Mk.IVF of No.68 Sqn by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - 450.00
 Of similar configuration, but usually outclassed by its British contemporary, the Bristol F2b, the Luft-Verkehrs-Gesellschaft LVG was essentially a strong and stable observation aircraft that served widely during World War 1. On 21st May 1917, this example became the victim of the guns of Sergeant John H Jones, contributing to his eventual tally of 15 victories. Here, his pilot that day, Captain W G Mostyn, has already had a squirt using his forward-firing Vickers gun before manoeuvring their 22 Sqn machine into position for Jones to finish the job with his twin Lewis guns.

Sergeant John H Jones and pilot Captain W G Mostyn, Bristol F2b Fighter claiming a Luft-Verkehrs-Gesellschaft LVG by Ivan Berryman. (Y)
Half Price! - 40.00
The military trained many of their first world war pilots on the Jenny.  Several thousand Jennies were produced and after the war many of these aircraft were purchased by some of the 20,000 airmen which left the armed services after world war one, paying a fraction of the cost for these aircraft.  Barnstorming began.  These pilots would make a living from Barnstorming across the US, giving rides to civilians for as much at 15 to 20 dollars a trip.  This was a time when most people had not seen an aircraft let alone go up in one.  Barnstorming gradually became saturated with pilots and aircraft and over a short peiod of time the prices paid for a trip in a Jenny went down toas low as 2 to 3 dollars, and making a living became hard for the pilots who could hardly pay for the fuel and living costs let alone aircraft maintenance.  There were a number of fatal accidents, but Barnstorming played a vital role in aviation and probably put the idea of becoming a pilot in the minds of many young boys who would later go on to fly in combat during world war two.

Balmy Days by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - 50.00
 Even the most faithful of Messerschmitt Me 109 pilots that also flew the Focke-Wulf Fw190 grudgingly admitted the well-proportioned and aesthetically pleasing Fw190 was the finest single-seat fighter in the Luftwaffes armoury during World War II. Soon after its arrival on the Channel Front in 1941, when initial bugs were ironed out, this superb fighter came close to fighter design perfection by the standards of the day. Just as the Mk IX Spitfire held the mantle as Britains most outstanding combat fighter of the war, so was the Fw190 regarded by experienced Luftwaffe pilots. Within months of its operational debut the Fw190 was causing widespread consternation among RAF pilots, the new fighter equal to the Mk IX Spitfire in all but its ability in the tightest of turning circles. By 1944 the technically superb Fw190 came into its own in the great air battles against the USAAFs massed daylight raids. The defence of the Reichs western airspace rested on the shoulders of a few Jagdgschwarden who, against steadily increasing odds, were tasked with interception and destruction of the attacking American heavy bombers. Flying alongside the two established Channel fighter wings JG2 Richthofen and JG26 Schlageter, equipped with Fw190s and led by the great fighter ace Oberst Walter Oesau, JG1 joined the battle in defence of northern Germany. Nicolas Trudgians painting Storm Chasers depicts the Fw190As of I./JG1, distinguished by their distinctive black and white striped cowls, scrambling from the snow-covered Dortmund airfield on 10 February 1944 to intercept another inbound American daylight raid. Nicks dramatic view of this technically supreme fighter conveys its true class as it hurtles over the airfield, its undercarriage retracting as the Fw190 accelerates into the climb. Below, sharing the airfield with I./JGI, are the Fw190s of the newly formed Sturmstaffel 1, identified by their black-white-black tail bands, seen taxiing out to join in the interception. Despite bad weather conditions the Luftwaffes defending fighters scored heavily that day, inflicting severe losses on the Americans, claiming 29 bombers and 8 fighters shot down in the action.

Storm Chasers by Nicolas Trudgian. (Y)
Half Price! - 110.00

 

NAVAL PRINTS

Click above to see all of our naval art index - Eight random half price naval items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Naval Art Offers

 Admiral Cuthbert Collingwoods flagship the Royal Sovereign comes under intense fire from the black-painted Spanish 3-decker, Santa Ana, and the French 74 Fougueux, just prior to breaking through the Franco-Spanish line at Trafalgar.
HMS Royal Sovereign by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - 625.00
 The Leander class cruiser HMS Orion is shown departing Grand Harbour Malta late in 1945.

HMS Orion by Ivan Berryman. (AP)
Half Price! - 25.00
 To increase the strength of the US fleet in the Pacific during the critical early months of the war, USS Indiana went through the Panama Canal. On the 28th of November 1942 USS Indiana joined Rear Admiral Lee's aircraft carrier screening force. For the next 11 months, USS Indiana helped protect USS Enterprise and USS Saratoga, which had been supporting the US invasion on the Solomon Islands. On the 21st of October 1943 USS Indiana went to Pearl Harbor, but after only a couple of weeks left to support forces designated for the invasion of the Gilbert Islands. The battleship protected the carriers which supported the Marines during the bloody fight for Tarawa atoll. Then, in late January 1944, she bombarded Kwajalein for eight days prior to the Marshall Island landings on 1st February 1944. USS Indiana collided with the battleship USS Washington while refuelling destroyers, killing several men. Temporary repairs to her starboard side were made at Majuro and USS Indiana returned to Pearl Harbor on 13th February 1944 for additional repair work. The painting shows USS Indiana with one of the two carriers she protected.

USS Indiana, First Tour of Duty by Anthony Saunders. (Y)
Half Price! - 230.00
Americas first true aircraft carrier, the USS Langley (CV-1) is pictured making way at sea as a pair of Douglas DT-2s pass overhead.

USS Langley by Ivan Berryman (AP)
Half Price! - 37.50

 HMS Prince of Wales enters Valetta harbour, Malta.

Enter the Prince by Anthony Saunders. (Y)
Half Price! - 55.00
Over 150 years of the Royal Navy are encapsulated in this view of the mighty HMS Nelson, moored at Portsmouth in 1945. Beyond the 16in guns of A turret, the masts of Admiral Nelsons flagship at Trafalgar, HMS Victory rise into the skyline whilst in the foreground MTB 507 cruises past on its way to the Solent.

HMS Nelson by Ivan Berryman (P)
Half Price! - 2750.00
 Spearheading the Falklands Task Force as it heads south in 1982, the carrier HMS Hermes is shown in company with two Type 21 frigates, HMS Arrow on the left and HMS Ardent in the near foreground.  In the far distance, HMS Glamorgan glints in the sun as Type 42 HMS Sheffield cuts across behind Hermes.

HMS Hermes by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - 15.00
The R-class battleship Royal Oak lies at anchor in Scapa Flow between the wars ahead of her sisters Royal Sovereign and Revenge. HMS Repulse is passing the line on the left of the picture.
HMS Royal Oak by Ivan Berryman. (B)
Half Price! - 13.00

 

MILITARY PRINTS

Click above to see all of our military art index - Eight random half price military items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Military Art Offers

So Tell The Spartans, Stranger passing by that here, Obedient to their laws, we lie.   In 480 BC the Spartans tried to defend the pass at Thermopylae against the Persians led by Xerxes.  The Persian fleet had sailed along the coastline from northern Greece into the Gulf of Malia on the eastern Aegean Sea towards the mountains at Thermopylae. The Greek General and King Leonidas led the Greeks  and tried to defend the pass of Thermopylae.  All the defending Spartans were killed during the Battle of Thermopylae. Their defence and courage provided inspiration to the Greeks, and the following year the Greeks won battles against their old enemy the Persians.

Thermopylae 480BC, Spartan and Thespaian Hoplites. By Chris Collingwood.
Half Price! - 85.00
The Allied breakthrough into the Normandy plain, against heavy German opposition. Filed marshall Montgomery claimed that Operation Goodwood had two major aims  the first being to break out from the beaches and the other to destroy the German armoured reserves and draw them away from the US forces that were preparing for Operation Cobra in the western sector.  The plan for the breakout began with a massive aerial bombardment, using the strategic air forces large bombers to decimate the German defending forces then Lt-General Richard OConnors VIII Corps comprising three whole armoured divisions  11th, 7th and Guards - and spearheaded by Major-General Pip Roberts 11th would then rush forward, overwhelm the defending Germans and causing the armoured forces to move forward and break out from the beach areas. To cover the flanks the Canadians would fight their way to Caen, while the British 3rd Infantry and 51st Highland Divisions would cover the left flank,  and move further eastward.

Operation Goodwood, Caen, Normandy, 18th-19th July, 1944 by David Rowlands (C)
Half Price! - 20.00
 Trapped within a rapidly decreasing perimeter, the exhausted BEF along with elements of the French 1st Army appeared to be at the mercy of the mighty Luftwaffe. No one though had reckoned on the brilliant leadership of Admiral Ramsay nor the gallant and unstinting efforts of the military and civilians who managed to rescue over 330,000 troops in nine days.

Operation Dynamo, Dunkirk, France 24th May - 4th June 1940 by David Pentland. (Y)
Half Price! - 50.00
DHM594.  17th Light Dragoons, 1780 by Jim Lancia.
17th Light Dragoons, 1780 by Jim Lancia.
Half Price! - 20.00

 Icy rain adds its misery to the bitter conflict on Drumossie Moor. In the shadow of the Black Isle, two English ships on the waters of the Moray Firth, await the outcome of the decisive battle. Pounded by Cumberlands gunners and raked by steady musketry, the Princes brave men can make no headway. Although the Irish and French regulars refuse to give ground, the Jacobite lines gradually disintegrate. Tired, cold and hungry men flea past Culloden House for the relative safety of Inverness. On the Scottish right the Argyll Militia, supported by Hawleys Dragoons, tear down the walls of the Culwiniac and Culchunaig enclosures in an outflanking attack. Avochies men offer some resistance but Major Gillies McBean stands alone on the breach. He cuts down more than a dozen Argylls, including Lord Robert Kerr, who lies mortally wounded, but his foes are too many. The hero eventually falls to a vicious cut to the forehead, his thigh bone is also broken. Despite the cries of a mounted officer to save that brave man, the major is ruthlessly bayonetted, his back against the wall. The victory is complete and nothing more can be done. In the distance, the Young Pretender is forced to abandon the field and Scotlands hope of claiming the British Throne.

Battle of Culloden by Mark Churms.
Half Price! - 50.00
French Dragoons charge a Prussian position during the Franco Prussian war.
The Charge by Alphonse de Neuville.
Half Price! - 25.00
 Soldiers of the Yorkist cause c.1461. Crossbowman, Man at arms and knight with the standard of the Sun in Splendour.

Sun in Splendour by Chris Collingwood. (Y)
Half Price! - 50.00
 OT34 Flamethrower tank and men of Col. Krickmans 6th Guards Tank Brigade take part in the Soviet counter attacks of 13th-27th September in defence of the southern factory district of Stalingrad before the final offensive in October.

Motherland, The Battle of Stalingrad, September 1942 by David Pentland. (GL)
Half Price! - 300.00

 

SPORT PRINTS

Click above to see all of our sport art index - Eight random half price sport items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Sport Art Offers

 Highbury legend David Seamans glittering career has made him one of the most popular players in the modern game. David has won two FA Cups, two English titles and a European Cup Winners Cup as well as being an ever present in the England side winning over 60 caps. Davids remarkable penalty saves in Euro 96, when England so nearly reached the final, made him Englands player of the year and fittingly David was awarded a testimonial for his loyal service to Arsenal at the end of the 2001 campaign.

David Seaman by Robert Highton. (Y)
Half Price! - 52.50
The painting portrays the Manchester United midfielder and England Captain David Beckham celebrating after scoring from a trademark free kick.

Seven by Robert Highton. (Y)
Half Price! - 50.00
SP4.  Desert Orchid by Mark Churms.

Desert Orchid by Mark Churms.
Half Price! - 35.00
 Jimmys total of 516 league appearances produced an amazing 357 goals.

Greavsie by Gary Keane.
Half Price! - 55.00

DHM1480P. Jenson Button 2004 BAR 006 by Ivan Berryman (P)
Jenson Button 2004 BAR 006 by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - 900.00
 The Intercontinental Formula was first organised by British Racing Drivers Club to allow the racing of cars with 2000cc to 3000cc engines. At the time the 1500cc limit of Formula 1 had been instituted by the international ruling body in the belief that the smaller cars would mean safer racing. In reality this meant that the relatively easy to handle Formula 1 cars could be driven by less experienced drivers almost as fast as the most experienced master drivers. The result was that the car with fractionally more power was the deciding factor in winning the race, rather than the better driver but this also compromised track safety. The introduction of the Intercontinental Formula was seen as more of a challenge for the drivers, with the larger and more powerful cars requiring greater skill and experience than to drive the 1500cc cars of Formula 1. The 13th International Trophy on Saturday 6th May 1961 was the first race of the season to carry World Championship points and consisted of 80 laps of Silverstone, a total of 233 miles. Stirling Moss, having already won the International Sports Car Race in a Lotus earlier that day, was driving Rob Walkers 2.5 litre Cooper Climax and qualified 2nd on the grid despite being unhappy with the steering of his car. The starting grid front row was Bruce McLaren, Stirling Moss, Jack Brabham and Graham Hill and by the time the race started at 2.30pm a heavy rain meant that the track was not only soaked but also covered in oil and rubber from the previous races. World Champion Jack Brabham made a superb start, passed Moss and was first into Copse and by lap 4 Moss was in 3rd place led by Surtees and Brabham. Due to appalling conditions and poor visibility many of the cars were spinning or leaving the track and by lap 13 Brabham and Moss were 1st and 2nd with the rest of the field some distance behind. Moss now poured on the pressure and for the next few laps he tried to pass as he harried Brabham in a duel for the lead. The pair were now beginning to lap the tailenders and, at around a quarter of the distance Moss was held up by Flockhart, Brabhams team member, who had allowed Brabham to pass. Moss gestured angrily to Flockhart as he was unable to follow Brabham and, as the rain paused for a while the pace became faster. Suddenly and quite dramatically Moss passed both Flockhart and Brabham and within 2 laps had gained 5 seconds on the World Champion. As the rain returned in a deluge Moss mercilessly pushed on, increasing his lead to 1.5 minutes by the halfway mark. Although he could have taken things easily at this point Moss drove on relentlessly at a seemingly impossible pace and was now lapping most of the field for a second time. By the  stage he completed his humiliation of Brabham by passing him for a second time to lap him representing a 3 mile lead. Moss eventually won the race in 2hrs 41 mins 19.2 secs, 1.5 laps ahead of Brabham and at least two laps ahead of the rest of the field in what were treacherous conditions. At the end of the race Moss summed up the experience as a nice ride, having proved himself to be one of the greatest and fastest drivers in the world under any conditions. Sir Stirling Moss believes this to be one of his finest ever drives.

A Moment of Triumph by Gerald Coulson. (Y)
Half Price! - 75.00
 Marlboro McLaren Mercedes MP4/11. 1996.
David Coulthard by Michael Thompson.
Half Price! - 25.00
 Rothmans Williams Renault FW18.  World Champion 1996.
Damon Hill by Michael Thompson.
Half Price! - 25.00

Everything we obtain for this site is shown on the site, we do not have any more photos, crew lists or further information on any of the ships.

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