Drake Class

Home ] Up ] Nelson Class ] Powerful Class ] Cressy Class ] Devonshire Class ] [ Drake Class ] Duke of Edinburgh Class ] Minotaur Class ] Monmouth Class ] Warrior Class 1905 ]

Royal Naval Drake Class armoured cruisers. The Drake Class consisted of HMS Drake, HMS Good Hope, HMS King Alfred and HMS Leviathan. These armoured cruisers were enlarged versions of the Cressy class but with increased armament of four 6 ins guns.

Displacement: 14,150 tons.    Horse power: 30,000.    Length: 500 ft.    Beam: 71 ft 4 ins.    Draught: 26 ft.    Armament: two 9.2 ins guns, sixteen 6 ins quick firing guns, fourteen 12 pounder guns, three 3 pounder guns and two 18 ins torpedo tubes.   Speed: 23 knots.    Complement: 900.

HMS Drake 5th March 1901 Sunk by torpedo on 2nd October 1917.
HMS Good Hope 21st February 1901 Sunk by gunfire 1st November 1914.
HMS King Alfred 28th October 1901 Sold and broken up 30th January 1920.
HMS Leviathan 3rd July 1901 Sold and broken up 3rd March 1920.
HMS Good Hope

HMS Good Hope - Name History

The second ?GOOD HOPE? is an 18-gun twin-screw cruiser, launched at Fairfield in 1901.  She is of 14,100 tons, 31,000 horse-power, and 24 knots speed.  Her length, beam, and draught are 500ft., 71ft., and 26ft.  This vessel?s original name was ?Africa,? but it was changed to ?Good Hope? before launching, in honour of the Cape Colony government, who had decided to present the Imperial government with a sum equivalent to the interest on her capital value. On November 25th, 1992, the ?Good Hope? left Portsmouth, commanded by Captain C.E. Madden and flying the flag of Rear-Admiral Wilmot H. Fawkes, conveying the Rt. Hon. Joseph Chamberlain to South Africa in connection with the settlement of many questions arising on the conclusion of the second Boer War.  She arrived at Durban on December 26th, 1902, and Mr. Chamberlain returned to England in the following year in the Union Castle.  ?Norman.?

HMS Good Hope before she was sunk by the German fleet off the coast of Chile on 1st November 1914. 

Click here for photo purchasing options

HMS Good Hope, sunk in the Battle of Coronel. 

Click here for photo purchasing options

HMS Good Hope.

Click here for photo purchasing options

HMS Good Hope.

Click here for photo purchasing options

HMS Good Hope

HMS Good Hope. 

HMS Good Hope, flagship to Rear-Admiral Sir Christopher Cradock (inset) during 1914.

Believed to be either HMS Good Hope or HMS King Alfred 

Click here for photo purchasing options

The crew of HMS Good Hope pictured c.1914. 

Click here for photo purchasing options

HMS Good Hope.  

Inside the casement of HMS Good Hope.

HMS Good Hope from the fore bridge.

Click here for photo purchasing options

HMS King Alfred

HMS King Alfred

Click here for photo purchasing options

HMS King Alfred.  

Click here for photo purchasing options

HMS King Alfred.

Click here for photo purchasing options

HMS King Alfred, c.1902

Click here for photo purchasing options

HMS King Alfred.

Click here for photo purchasing options

HMS King Alfred in 1902

HMS King Alfred.  

Thanks to Peter Gillespie

HMS King Alfred.

HMS Leviathan

HMS Leviathan.

Click here for photo purchasing options

HMS Leviathan pictured c.1912, with her war paint. 

Click here for photo purchasing options

The Armoured Cruiser Leviathan

The Leviathan was built at Clydebank and completed at Portsmouth. She had a water-line armour belt, while her two 9.2 in guns were placed in armoured barbettes, her 6 in quick firers were also well protected by armour. While en route to Portsmouth from the Clyde she maintained a speed of 19 knots while being able on paper to reach 23 knots. The ships in this class were a great improvement on the old protected cruisers.

HMS Leviathan

Click here for photo purchasing options

HMS Leviathan.

Click here for photo purchasing options