Home ] Up ] Acknowledgements ] How to use our site ]

HMS Alexandra 

Home ] Up ] HMS Neptune ] HMS Royal Sovereign 1857 ] HMS Prince Albert 1864 ] Warrior Class ] Defence Class ] Hector Class ] Achilles ] Prince Consort Class ] Devastation Class ] HMS Royal Alfred ] Minotaur Class ] HMS Research ] HMS Enterprise - 1864 ] HMS Favorite ] HMS Zealous ] HMS Sultan ] HMS Superb ] Scorpion Class ] Cerberus Class ] HMS Abyssinia ] HMS Glatton ] HMS Rupert 1872 ] HMS Dreadnought ] Cyclops Class ] Agamemnon Class Turret Ships ] Colossus Class ] HMS Colossus ] Conqueror Class ] HMS Victoria ] Admiral Class ] HMS Sans Pareil ] HMS Nile ] Victoria Class ] Trafalgar Class ] Royal Sovereign Class ] HMS Hood ] Centurion Class ] HMS Barfleur ] HMS Centurion ] HMS Renown 1895 ] Majestic Class ] HMS Edinburgh ] Canopus Class ] Formidable Class ] London Class ] Duncan Class ] King Edward Class ] HMS Trafalgar ] HMS Inflexible ] [ HMS Alexandra ] Belleisle Class ] Ironclad Battleships ] Lord Clyde Class ] HMS Royal Oak ] HMS Captain 1869 ] HMS Hotspur ] HMS Temeraire 1876 ] Audacious Class 1869 ] Swiftsure Class ] HMS Penelope ]

Choose the navy or section of interest below:

Royal Navy United States Germany France Japan Italy Russia Austria-Hungary
Canada Spain Netherlands Argentina Brazil Portugal Turkey Australia
Norway Sweden Denmark Belgium Chile Uruguay China New Zealand
Malta Greece India Poland South Africa Pakistan Libya Kuwait
Ireland Other Navies Liners   Unidentified Ships Wartime Naval Losses


Customer Helpline (UK) : 01436 820269
Subscribe to our Newsletter!

You currently have no items in your basket

Choose a FREE print if you spend over £220!
See Choice of Free Prints

Payment Options Display
Buy with confidence and security!
Publishing historical art since 1985

Google

 

Web

www.battleships-cruisers.co.uk

 

Pre Dreadnought Battleship HMS Alexandra. In 1878 the Alexandra was commanded by Captain Robert Fitzroy through the Dardanelles to Constantinople and although grounded was refloated without damage. In 1882 HMS Alexandra took part in the bombardment of Alexandria under Captain Charles Hotham. Marines from the Alexandra joined the army at Kassassin and Tel-el-Kebir. She also saw service on the Nile. King George 5th served as a lieutenant aboard the Alexandra during 1887-88.

Displacement:  9,90tons.    Horse power: 8,610.    Length: 325 ft.    Beam: 64 ft.    Draught: 26 ft.    Armament: 12 guns.    Speed 15 knots.    Complement: .

HMS ALEXANDRA LAUNCHED 1877 SOLD AT CHATHAM 1903

HMS Alexandra, 1877.

Click here for photo purchasing options

HMS Alexandra.

Click here for photo purchasing options

HMS Alexandra, 1877.

Click here for photo purchasing options

HMS Alexandra, 1877.

Click here for photo purchasing options

HMS Alexandra

Click here for photo purchasing options

In 1878 the Alexandra commanded by Captain Robert Fitzroy and flying the flag of Vice-Admiral Geoffrey Hornby, was at the head of six ships which cleared for action and proceeded through the Dardanelles to Constantinople to protect British interests during the conflict between Russia and Turkey. The Turks did not obstruct the passage of the ships, and no fighting took place. During the entry the Alexandra took the ground, but was got off without damage, and she was told off to attack the heavy 50 ton gun at the entrance if there had been any fighting. It was fortunate that the Turks did not fire, for it might have been impossible to save the stranded flagship. The Sultan which, appropriately enough, was commanded by Captain His Royal Highness the Duke of Edinburgh, K.G., turned back and gave such assistance as was necessary, to enable the Alexandra to be promptly refloated. Vice-Admiral Hornby was awarded with a KCB for his tactful management of the situation.

In July 1882 the Alexandra, commanded by Captain Charles Frederick Hotham, and flying the flag of Admiral Sir Frederick Beauchamp Seymour, lay at Alexandra at the head of a fleet of 14 ships. On July 11th the Alexandra fired the first shot of the bombardment of Alexandria at 7 am, the Egyptians having refused to surrender the forts. Owing to the flagship's draught of water, Sir Beauchamp Seymour had temporarily transferred his flag to the Invincible, but the Alexandra was stationed 1500 yards from Lighthouse Fort. All ships were cleared for action, topgallantmasts being struck and bowsprits rigged in. By 7.10 am all ships were engaged, and all the forts that could bring their guns to bear replied with vigour. By 5pm all guns ashore had been silenced, and the fleet ceased bombarding at 5.30 pm. The Alexandra received a 10 inch shell through an unarmoured portion of her side, which lodged on the main deck with the fuse burning. Gunner Israel Harding flung some water over it, and then picked up the shell and immersed it in a tub of water. For this act he was promoted to chief gunner and received the Victoria Cross. The British casualties were 5 killed and 28 wounded, to which the Alexandra contributed 1 killed and 3 wounded. The Egyptian loss has never been properly ascertained, but it is believed to have been about 150 killed and 400 wounded out of the 2000 men engaged in working the forts. The Alexandra had 24 hits from shot or shell outside her armour, and was struck in all about 60 times.

The men from the Alexandra then assisted in the occupation and policing of the town. Midshipman D R DeChair of this ship, while carrying despatches between Ras et Tin and Ramleh, lost his way, and fell into the hands of the rebels. He was well treated by Arabi Pasha, but was not liberated until the British Army occupied Cairo.

On 5th August the Alexandra contributed to a Naval Brigade which left Alexandria in the armoured train commanded by Captain John Fisher, of the Inflexible. Admiral Sir Beauchamp Seymour and Flag-Lieutenant the Hon. Hedworth Lambton accompanied the Brigade. The marines were de-trained about 800 yards from from Mehallet Junction, and, assisted by a 40 pounder Armstrong gun, quickly dislodged the enemy. During the evening the Brigade was exposed to a galling fire, but the marines behaved with great gallantry and bore the brunt of the attack. The casualties in this affair were 1 marine killed and 12 wounded, and 1 seaman killed and 4 wounded. The Naval Brigade were then recalled to their ships.

In August the Alexandra's marines assisted in the seizure and control of the Suez Canal. 

In September the Alexandra contributed men and machine guns to a Naval Brigade - 250 strong- under Captain Robert Fitzroy, of the Orion, which joined the army at Kassassin commanded by General Sir Garnet Wolseley. On September 13th the army met the enemy at Tel-el-Kebir, and defeated them with great slaughter. The marines attacked the Tel-el-Kebir lines with great courage, engaged the enemy at hand-grips, and carried the position. The Arabs broke and fled, and were pursued for 4 miles. The marines lost 2 officers, 1 NCO, and 10 men killed and 4 officers and 43 men wounded. Lieutenant Wyatt Rawson RN, who was Naval ADC to Sir Garnet Wolseley, was mortally wounded. A few days later the Naval Brigade were withdrawn to their ships.

In 1885 the Alexandra contributed to a Naval Brigade which operated on the Nile under Captain Lord Charles Beresford and took part in the battles of Abu Klea, Metemmeh and Wad-Habeshi, and in the relief of Sir Charles Wilson.

Admiral Sir Beauchamp was raised to the peerage as Baron Alcester and Captain C F Hotham rewarded with a CB for their services.

From May 20th 1887 to July 1st 1887, and from April 21st 1888 to November 5th 1888, HRH Prince George of Wales, later to become His Most Gracious Majesty King George the Fifth, served in this ship as a lieutenant.

In 1890 the Alexandra was reconstructed, and re-rigged with fighting tops, but she saw no more active service. In 1908 the Alexandra was sold at Devonport.

Extracted from "The King's Ships" 1915 by Leckie

In the Petty Officers Reading Room in the Alexandra

The Petty Officers on board ship performed duties that correspond roughly to the duties performed by non-commissioned officers in the Army during 1896. They were supplied by the Admiralty with a number of newspapers and periodicals, and the reading room was a place on board set apart out of working hours for their use - sometimes cut off by a canvas screen - where the petty officers could "recreate" generally, apart from the rest of the ship's company. Backgammon, draughts, chess and games at cards were allowed with the proviso that there was no gambling.

Click here for photo purchasing options

Jack in his Watch Below on Board the Alexandra

Here we see Jack turned in for the night. In the 1890's a sailor slept where he lived and had his meals, clearing a space to sling his hammock in by removing the mess tables and gear used by day out of the way and securing them overhead. To the landsman a hammock was not the easiest to get into, without risk of overleaping oneself and coming down on deck on the other side. Grave consequences might well ensue from a cutting down of the lashings at the head of a sleeper, a not infrequent way among the midshipmen of the old days of paying off scores.

Click here for photo purchasing options

HMS Alexandra, January, 1897

HMS Alexandra

Captain W H Pigott in his Cabin, 1896

The Company of the Alexandra at Portland

The company of the second-class battleship Alexandra - the Duke of Edinburgh's old flagship in the Mediterranean - assembled in the waist of the vessel. The officers are seen on the port gangway, at the side of the ship, which forms a means of communication fore and aft. In our photograph, the "Red" Marines (Light Infantry) are seen to starboard, and the "Blue" Marines (Artillery) to port, with the bluejackets massed in port and starboard watches, and a number of the petty officers of the Alexandra. The Alexandra was stationed at Portland in 1896 to act as flagship of the First Reserve or coastguard ships. As a coastguard ship she was manned below the level of seagoing complement, the ship's full strength being provided under the mobilization scheme by the addition of drafts of coastguardsmen from the stations nearest Portland and the Naval Reserve men drawn from the neighbouring districts.

Click here for photo purchasing options

In the Battery of the Alexandra 1896

The photograph shows one of the 22 ton breech loading guns forming part of the upper central battery of the Alexandra battleship, "cast loose" for action and about to be fired. This is the scene which one would see if a hostile ship came within range of the Alexandra's guns. The Captain of the gun is shown with outstretched lanyard in hand waiting for the order to "commence firing". Behind him are men of the gun detachment; one with a sponge for wiping out the bore of the gun after the round was fired, and another, with a fresh cartridge in its leather case ready for use. The Alexandra was constructed with two central batteries one above the other; the upper mounted four 22 ton breech loading guns and the lower mounted eight 18 ton muzzle loaders, a combination of heavy armament not found on any other British battleship at the time (1896).

Click here for photo purchasing options

 
 

Valuations

Classified Ads Terms and Conditions Shipping Info Contact Details

 

 

Click here to go to our naval history forum

 

AVIATION PRINTS

Click above to see all of our aviation art index - Eight random half price aviation items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Aviation Art Offers

 With the morning sun glinting on their fuselages, P-51 Mustangs of the 78th Fighter Group cross the Dutch coastline far below, as they head back towards their base at Duxford, England at the end of a long sweep east of the Rhine crossing, Spring 1945.  The final months of the war in Europe lie ahead, and for the P-51 pilots victory is within sight.  Finally, after years of toil, the sky was theirs.

Opening Sky by Robert Taylor.
Half Price! - £125.00
 One of the most notable pilots of 3 Squadron was the Frenchman Pierre Clostermann who enjoyed much success flying Spitfires with the Free French 341 <i>Alsace</i> Squadron before moving to 602 and 274 Squadrons RAF.  Once on the strength of 3 Squadron, however, he quickly got to grips with the mighty Hawker Tempest V in which he downed two Focke-Wulf Fw.190D-9s on 20th April 1945, just two of the confirmed 12 aircraft destroyed whilst flying the Tempest, plus 6 shared and two probables.  He is shown here flying Tempest V NV724, bearing the legend <i>Le Grand Charles</i> and the Squadron badge on the tailfin.

Tribute to Flt Lt Pierre Clostermann by Ivan Berryman. (AP)
Half Price! - £90.00
Without doubt one of the most outstanding and versatile aircraft in the Allied inventory during World War II, the Bristol Beaufighter was to endure a cautious reception by its crews when it first entered service, not least due to difficulties experienced by crews attempting to abandon a stricken aircraft in an emergency.  Its performance and hard-hitting potential quickly overcame such doubts, however, and it went on to earn a commendable reputation - and the nickname Whispering Death.  Here, two 254 Sqn TF. MkXs attack a captured Norwegian vessel in 1945.

Seastrike by Ivan Berryman
Half Price! - £45.00
 RAF Mosquitos attack a German supply train.

Mosquito Bite by Geoff Lea. (P)
Half Price! - £1400.00

 Focke-Wulf FW.190A-5/U8 of 1 Gruppe, Schnellkampfgeschwader 10 in 1943. All national markings were painted out, except for the call sign C on the fuselage and repeated, crudely sprayed, on the engine cowling.

Focke-Wulf Fw190A-5/U8 by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - £500.00
 On 31st August 1944, 6 Mosquitoes of 305 Polish Squadron, Lasham, 2nd TAF were led by Wing Commander Orlinski to attack oil refineries at Nomexy, south of Nancy, France. Diving down and releasing their bombs before escaping at tree top height they destroyed 4 large containers and several smaller ones. All aircraft safely returned after their four and a half hour sortie. Fl Lt Eric Atkins DFC(bar) KW(bar) and his navigator Fl Lt Majer can be seen exiting the area to reform on the other 3 Mosquitoes who have already finished their bombing run. This was Atkins 61st operation, finishing the war with 78 ops over 3 tours.

Mosquito Attack by Graeme Lothian. (Y)
Half Price! - £310.00
 Flying as Leader of B Flight, 41 Sqn, on 15th August 1940, Pilot Officer Ted Shipman and the rest of his flight found themselves among a mass of Messerschmitt Bf.110s that had been detailed to escort a bomber force of Heinkel He111s on a raid on the North of England.  Having made one head-on attack on one of the Bf.110s, Shipman manoeuvred his Spitfire Mk.1 onto the tail of another and fired a long burst into it.  This was M8+CH of Oberleutnant Hans-Ulrich Kettling of 1./ZG76 and rear Gunner / Radio Operator O/ Gefr Volk, whose starboard engine burst into flames and disappeared into the dense cloudbase.  Shipman claimed this initially as a probable, but it was later confirmed as a victory when the aircraft was found to have crash landed at Streatham Nr Barnard Castle.  Spitfire K9805 (EB-L) is depicted breaking off the attack as Kettling's stricken Bf.110 begins to burn.  Ted Shipman would go on to serve with the Royal Air Force until December 1959 retiring as a Wing Commander.  Ted would also go onto become friends with  Hans-Ulrich Kettling, the pilot he shot down.

Tribute to Pilot Officer Ted Shipman by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - £725.00
 Pushing the concept of the Spitfire almost to the limit, the sleek F Mk212 represented the ultimate in fighter design at the end of the Second World War. Powered by the mighty Griffon 61 engine driving a five blade propeller, its armament consisted of four 20mm British Hispano Cannon, two in each wing. This example is LA200 (DL-E) of 91 Sqn in 1945.

Spitfire F Mk21 by Ivan Berryman. (C)
Half Price! - £70.00

 

NAVAL PRINTS

Click above to see all of our naval art index - Eight random half price naval items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Naval Art Offers

 A splendid little war was how John Hay, ambassador to Britain, described the Spanish-American war of 1898. Though the war was small in scope it was large in consequences; it promoted the regeneration of the American Navy and the emergence of the United States as a major world power. Fought primarily at sea, the war created an American naval legend in its opening encounter between the pacific squadrons of Spain and the United States at Manila Bay on the 1st of May 1898. At sunrise Admiral Dewey, leading the American fleet in his flagship the USS Olympia, had caught the Spanish fleet, under Admiral Patricio Montojo, by surprise - still anchored off Sangley Point at Manila Bay in the Philippine Islands. Defeat for the Spanish was total and heralded the end of a once extensive Spanish empire in the Americas. Montojos flagship, Reina Cristina, is seen here under fire from the Olympia.

The Battle of Manila Bay by Anthony Saunders (Y)
Half Price! - £62.50
 The largest and fastest of all the ships that took part in the Battle of Jutland, the elegant battle cruiser HMS Tiger was launched in 1913 and is easily recognisable by the unusual position of Q turret just aft of the third funnel, She is shown about  to pass beneath the Forth Bridge as she departs Rosyth for a sea trial

HMS Tiger by Ivan Berryman (AP)
Half Price! - £25.00
Together with her sister ship, Hercules, HMS Colossus acquitted herself well at the Battle of Jutland where she fired 93 12in rounds, but received only two hits from enemy fire which caused minor damage and left nine crew injured.  She was sold for scrap in 1928.

HMS Colossus by Ivan Berryman
Half Price! - £28.00
B63.  HMS Malaya at Capetown by Ivan Berryman.

HMS Malaya at Capetown by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £15.00

 The heavy cruiser HMS Dorsetshire is brought up to sink the blazing wreck of the Bismarck with torpedoes at around 10:30 hours on the morning of May 27th 1941.  The once proud German ship had been ruthlessly pounded into a twisted and burning wreck by the British battleships Rodney and King George V.  HMS Dorsetshire and HMS Maori combed the area of the sinking for survivors, between them picking up a total of 110 out of an original complement of 2,300.

HMS Dorsetshire (The End of the Bismarck) by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £15.00
 17th February 1943, U-201 with U-69 were ordered to intercept the westbound convoy ONS165. With fuel low U-201 was eventually forced to surface following a depth charge attack and rammed by the Destroyer HMS Fame.

U-201 Deadly Chase by Anthony Saunders. (Y)
Half Price! - £50.00
Bismarck, now complete and newly painted in full Baltic camouflage, returns to Hamburg for the last time as the harsh winter of 1940/41 relents and the pride of the German Kriegsmarine prepares for real action.  In the distance, the pre-Dreadnought Schleswig-Holstein awaits her next commission, the old ship alternating between vital ice-breaker and air defence duties at this time.  The Bismarck would in May 1941 put to sea and engage and sink HMS Hood only to be caught by the British battleships Rodney and King George V.  Bismarck was pounded into a floating wreck, finally being sunk by the torpedoes of HMS Dorsetshire.  From her crew of 2300 only 110 would be rescued by HMS Dorsetshire and HMS Maori.

Bismarck Entering Hamburg Harbour by Ivan Berryman
Half Price! - £15.00
A class submarine, HMS Anchorite, swings away from the depot ship Adamant during work up exercises in the Firth of Clyde. In the mid fifties the depot ship was moored in Rothesay Bay providing a base for the 3rd Submarine Squadron. Leaving the moorings ahead of Anchorite is the frigate HMS Termagant which will day part in the days exercise.

Group Up- Half Ahead Starboard by Robert Barbour.
Half Price! - £30.00

 

MILITARY PRINTS

Click above to see all of our military art index - Eight random half price military items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Military Art Offers

 British military manoeuvres with the Duke of Cambridge watching the advance of a highland regiment.
Manoeuvres at Aldershot by Edouard Detaille. (Y)
Half Price! - £30.00
 Study for the original painting Charge and Pursue.
Sowar of Probyns Horse Engages Mutineers at Lucknow, 1857 by Mark Churms. (P)
Half Price! - £175.00
 Baron de Donops Brigade at the Battle of Waterloo, 5.30pm, 18th June 1815.  After four hours of fighting, the squadrons of Napoleons 3rd Cavalry Corps finally join the massed assaults on the battered allied infantry squares.  With the 42 year old marechal de camp Frederic-Guillaume de Donop at their head, the 2nd and 3rd Cuirassier Regiments break from a trot into a canter as they clear the ridge.  The heavy cavalry are smashed against the steadfast bayonets of the redcoats and countercharged by light horsemen.  In one of these encounters the general himself is terribly wounded and falls from his horse. His son (aide-de-camp) is also injured.  Both are reported missing and presumed captured.  Although the generals body is not found,it is certain that he met his death in the muddy fields of Waterloo alongside many of his brigade.  In 1895 his name is inscribed on the north face of LArc de Triomphe in Paris in recognition of his service to France.

La Charge (Donops Cavalry at Waterloo) by Mark Churms. (Y)
Half Price! - £50.00
 The storming on the night of April 6th 1812 of Badajoz astle proved to be Wellingtons bloodiest siege. Depicted here are soldiers of the 88th Connaught Rangers (famously the Devils Own) and part of Pictons 3rd Division, successfully escalading the high walls of the fortress.

Storming of Badajoz by Chris Collingwood. (Y)
Half Price! - £65.00

The Battle of Waterloo.18 June 1815.  The Scots Greys (The Royal North British Dragoons ), as the rest of the British heavy cavalry advanced against the French infantry, just after 1:30 p.m., Lieutenant-Colonel Hamilton witnessed Pack's Brigade beginning to crumble, and the 92nd Highlanders (The Gordon Highlanders ) were falling back in disorder.  On his initiative, Lieutenant-Colonel Hamilton ordered the Scots Greys forward at the walk.  Because the ground was muddy and uneven, The Scots Greys remained at the walk until they had passed through the Gordon Highlanders.  The arrival of the Scots Greys helped to rally the Gordons, who turned to attack the French Infantry.  Even without attacking at a full gallop, the weight of the Scots Greys charge proved to much for the French column attacking Pack's Brigade.
Scotland yet onto Victory by Richard Caton Woodville.
Half Price! - £20.00
DHM0270P. Unhooked, Kings Troop R.H.A Number 2, by Mark Churms.

Unhooked, Kings Troop R.H.A Number 2, by Mark Churms. (P)
Half Price! - £2500.00
 Hill 112, Normandy, 28th June 1944.  Infantry of the 11th Armoured Division digging in during the battle for the strategically important Hill 112.  The division comprised of the 8th Motor Battalion Rifle Brigade, 4th King's Shropshire Light Infantry, 3rd Monmouthshires,1st Herefords, 3rd Royal Tank Regiment, 2nd Fife & Forfarshire, Yeomanry and 23rd Hussars.

Digging In by David Pentland. (P)
Half Price! - £700.00
 Below the vast bulk of the Zoo Bunker one of three giant Flak towers designed to defend Berlin from air attack, some remnants of the citys defenders gather in an attempt to break out of the doomed capital. Amongst which are troops from the 9th Fallschirmjäger and Münchberg Panzer Divisions, including a rare nightfighting equipped Panther G of Oberleutnant Rasims Company, 1/29th Panzer Regiment.

Panther at the Zoo, Tiergarten, berlin, 2nd May 1945 by David Pentland.
Half Price! - £100.00

 

SPORT PRINTS

Click above to see all of our sport art index - Eight random half price sport items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Sport Art Offers

B47. Eddie Irvine/ Ferrari F.310. by Ivan Berryman.

Eddie Irvine/ Ferrari F.310. by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £40.00
 Valentino Rossi at speed on his Repsol Honda.
Rossi at Speed by Derrick Mark.
Half Price! - £25.00
 Ferrari Pit Stop 2001.
Masters of Strategy II by Michael Thompson.
Half Price! - £33.00
 Three Steps To Heaven pays tribute to one of the greatest strikers to play for Liverpool and in particular, the historic Cup treble in 2001. It contains details of the FA Cup triumph over Arsenal, Worthington Cup win over Birmingham City and the unforgettable 5-4 defeat of Spanish side Alaves to complete the cup treble and bring back the UEFA Cup to Merseyside.

Three Steps to Heaven by Robert Highton. (Y)
Half Price! - £72.00

 Michael Schumacher wins again!

From Pole to Flag by Graham Bosworth
Half Price! - £20.00
 M. Schumacher / JP Montoya.  Brazilian GP 2001.

Close Encounters by Michael Thompson.
Half Price! - £25.00
22nd - 24th September 1995, Oakhill Country Club, Rochester, New York.  Against all odds the triumphant European team beat the USA in one of the most dramatic finishes of all time, to bring home the Ryder Cup for Europe.
Ryder Cup Victors by Peter Wileman
Half Price! - £50.00
 England Captain martin Johnson lifts the World Rugby Cup, as winners of the 2003 World Rugby Cup in Australia.

Martin Johnson by Chris Howells.
Half Price! - £45.00

Everything we obtain for this site is shown on the site, we do not have any more photos, crew lists or further information on any of the ships.

COPYRIGHT NOTICE. ALL IMAGES DISPLAYED ON THIS WEBSITE ARE PROTECTED BY  COPYRIGHT  LAW, AND ARE OWNED BY CRANSTON FINE ARTS OR THEIR RESPECTIVE OWNERS.  NO REPRODUCTION OR COPYING ALLOWED ON OTHER WEBSITES, BOOKS OR ARTICLES WITHOUT PRIOR AGREEMENT.

This website is owned by Cranston Fine Arts.  Torwood House, Torwoodhill Road, Rhu, Helensburgh, Scotland, G848LE

Contact: Tel: (+44) (0) 1436 820269.  Fax: (+44) (0) 1436 820473. Email:

Return to Home Page