HMS Ramillies

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HMS Ramillies, of the Royal Sovereign  Class Battleship of the Royal Navy. Built by J and G Thomson at Clydebank and launched 1st March 1892.  HMS Ramillies Cost just over ?900,000 to complete. Served the last years in Home waters before being scrapped 7th October 1913

Displacement: 14,150 tons.    Horse power: 13,000.    Beam: 75ft.   Draught: 27' 6".    Armament: four 67 ton guns in armoured barbettes.    Armour: partial armour of 18 inches thick.    Speed:17.5 knots.

HMS Ramillies.

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HMS Ramillies.

HMS Ramillies was one of the flagships of the British Mediterranean Fleet in  1897 the other being HMS Revenge. The Ramillies flew the flag of Admiral Sir John O Hopkins, the Commander-in-Chief. From the senior flagship all orders & signals would be made, however should signalling become impossible, each group of ships would simply watch and follow the movements of the flagship.

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HMS Ramillies, 1893.

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HMS Ramillies, March, 1894

HMS Ramillies - Flagship of the Mediterranean Squadron

The Ramillies was a steel armoured battleship of the Naval Defence Act Programme and was completed for sea in 1893. She was built by contract at the yard of Messrs J & G Thomson at Clydebank and engined by the same firm. The Ramillies was in commission from the October 1893 in the Mediterranean where she carried the flag of Admiral Sir Michael Culme-Seymour, KCB.

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Rear Admiral Lord Charles Beresford and Officers of the Ramillies c.1901.

The Officers and Crew of the Ramillies in 1902

Before Lord Charles Beresford became second in command on the Mediterranean station, he had little opportunity to make a record as a tactician. It had been assumed indeed that the Admiral had not made a study of this branch of the naval organisation. But the manner in which he handled a fleet in the Mediterranean amply disproved the assertions of his critics. Whatever it may have been at an earlier period, his professional reputation was enhanced by his services up the Straits, and he showed that in tactical ability he was worthy to take place beside our foremost admirals. The photograph above gives a good representation of the ship's company to which this popular admiral formerly belonged. It shows the officers and crew of the Ramillies, with Lord Charles Beresford in the centre, and gives a good idea of the harmony which prevailed on board.

A model of HMS Ramillies made at the time of construction. c.1892