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Eclipse class masted cruisers of the Royal Navy launched from 1875-77. Ships in the class were HMS Eclipse, HMS Diana, HMS Dido, HMS Doris, HMS Isis, HMS Juno, HMS Minerva, HMS Talbot and HMS Venus.  ordered under the Spencer naval programme of 1893. These second class cruisers had a laregr dispalcement than previous 2nd class cruisers and also a heavier calibre of armament.

HMS Diana was built at Fairfields and laid down on the 13th August 1894, being launched 5th December 1895. completed for service 15th June 1897.  She serve din the Mediterranean until 1913 and transferred back the the UK to the 3rd Fleet at Devonport. At the outbreak of war HMS Diana joined the The Cruiser Force G in the English Channel. and on the 6tyh August captured A German Schooner. In February 1915  she joined the 12th cruiser squadron and was transferred in November 1915 to the China Station until August 1917, moving to the red Sea and Indian Ocean until the end of the war. In June 1919 she was paid off at Queenstown and scrapped in 1920

HMS Dido was built at London and Glasgow and laid down on the 30th August 1894, being launched 20th March 1896. completed for service 10th May 1898. In 1907 HMS Dido joined the the Channel Fleet then in 1909  joined the Home Fleet at the Nore. 1sr battle squadron in 1909 - 1910 and then went to Chatham for refit. In September 1911 joined the Home fleet at the Nore again

HMS Doris was built at Barrow by Naval Construction and Armaments Company and laid down on the 29th August 1894, being launched 3rd March 1896. completed for service 18th November 1897.

HMS Juno was built at Barrow by Naval Construction and Armaments Company and laid down on the 22nd June 1894, being launched 16th November 1895. completed for service 16th June 1897.

Displacement: 5600 tons.    I.H.P: c.8,000    Length: 350 feet.    Beam: 53 ft 6 ins.   Depth: 20 ft 6 ins.    Speed: c.18.5 knots.     Complement: 450.

HMS Diana 5th December 1895 Sold for scrap in 1920.
HMS Dido 20th March 1896 Sold for scrap in 1926.
HMS Doris 3rd March 1896 Sold for scrap in 1919.
HMS Eclipse 19th July 1894 Sold in 1921.
HMS Isis 27th June 1896 Sold for scrap in 1920.
HMS Juno 16th November 1895 Sold for scrap in 1920.
HMS Minerva 23rd September 1895 Sold in 1920.
HMS Venus 5th September 1895 Sold in 1921.
HMS Talbot 25th April 1895 Sold for scrap in 1921.
HMS Diana

HMS Diana was built at Fairfields and laid down on the 13th August 1894, being launched 5th December 1895. completed for service 15th June 1897.  She serve din the Mediterranean until 1913 and transferred back the the UK to the 3rd Fleet at Devonport. At the outbreak of war HMS Diana joined the The Cruiser Force G in the English Channel. and on the 6tyh August captured A German Schooner. In February 1915  she joined the 12th cruiser squadron and was transferred in November 1915 to the China Station until August 1917, moving to the red Sea and Indian Ocean until the end of the war. In June 1919 she was paid off at Queenstown and scrapped in 1920

Displacement: 5600 tons.    I.H.P: c.8,000    Length: 350 feet.    Beam: 53 ft 6 ins.   Depth: 20 ft 6 ins.    Speed: c.18.5 knots.     Complement: 450.

HMS Diana.

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HMS Diana.

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HMS Diana anchored in Malta's Grand Harbour in 1919.

Commander Halsey's Navy Eight from HMS Diana - winners of the United Service Challenge Cup in 1902.

HMS Diana - Name History

The eleventh “DIANA” is an 11-gun twin-screw cruiser launched at Govan in 1895.  She is of 5600 tons, 9600 horse-power, and 19 knots speed.  Her length, beam, and draught were 350ft., 54ft., and 21ft. 

HMS Dido

Displacement: 5600 tons.    I.H.P: c.8,000    Length: 350 feet.    Beam: 53 ft 6 ins.   Depth: 20 ft 6 ins.    Speed: c.18.5 knots.     Complement: 450.

HMS Dido

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HMS Dido at speed

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HMS Dido

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HMS Dido - Name History

The fifth “DIDO” is an 11-gun twin-screw cruiser launched at Glasgow in 1896.  She is of 5600 tons, 9600 horse-power, and 19.5 knots speed.  Her length, beam, and draught were 350ft., 54ft., and 21ft. At her launch on March 17th an unusual accident occurred.  As the ship was moving into the water the ground under the ways suddenly sank, and the ship was thrown out of the cradle, sustaining serious damage.  She lay half in and half out of the water for three days before she was finally floated.  In 1900 the “Dido,” commanded by Captain Philip Francis Tillard, played a minor part in the third China War or Boxer Riots.  

HMS Doris

Displacement: 5600 tons.    I.H.P: c.8,000    Length: 350 feet.    Beam: 53 ft 6 ins.   Depth: 20 ft 6 ins.    Speed: c.18.5 knots.     Complement: 450.

HMS Doris.

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HMS Doris.

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HMS Doris

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A Piper pictured on HMS Doris c.1904

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HMS Doris

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HMS Doris - Name History

The fourth ”DORIS” is an 11-gun twin-screw cruiser launched at Barrow in 1896.  She is of 5600 tons, 9600 horse-power, and 19.5 knots speed.  Her length, beam, and draught were 350ft., 54ft., and 21ft.  In 1899 and 1900 the “Doris,” commanded by Captain Reginald C. Prothero, and flying the flag of Rear-Admiral Sir Robert Harris, played an important part in the second Boer War.  On November 19th the “Doris” contributed to a Naval Brigade of 350 men, commanded by Captain Reginald C. Prothero, which proceeded to the front, and three days later joined General Lord Methuen at Belmont.  On November 25th the Naval Brigade fought at the battle of graspan.  The men paraded at 5a.m. and after the kopje had been shelled the seamen and marines, led by the flag Captain, advanced on the enemy’s position.  The Boers opened a heavy fire at 600 yards and soon supplemented it with a cross fire.  Nevertheless the brigade advanced steadily by rushes, and in spite of a loss of 15 killed and 79 wounded gained the summit of the kopje, driving the Boers thence in full retreat.  So many officers had been killed and wounded, among the latter Flag Captain Prothero, that the command of the Naval Brigade developed upon Captain Alfred Edmund Marchant, R. M. L. I., who was once promoted to the rank of major.  Thus, for the first time for many years, a Naval Brigade, composed of both Bluejackets and marines, had the honour of being commanded by an officer of the Royal Marines.  A feature of the attack was the bravery of Midshipman Cymbeline Huddart of the “Doris,” who, though twice hit, courageously pressed forward until mortally wounded.  Her Majesty the late Queen Victoria was pleased to honour the Naval Brigade by telegraphing her congratulations on its gallantry, and Lord Methuen paid it a special visit and complimented it on its splendid behaviour.  On December 14th the Naval guns were in action bombarding the Boer positions at Modder River, and a Naval searchlight worked by Midshipman James Menzies of the “Doris” got into communication with the beleagured town of Kimberley.  In February two 4.7-guns proceeded to the front under Commander William Lowther Grant of the “Doris,” and subsequently took part in the battle of Paardeberg and the capture of General Cronje.  This party assisted in the capture of Bloemfontein, and suffered very severely indeed from enteric fever, no fewer than 89 officers and men being taken ill there.  They assisted in the capture of Johannesburg and of Pretoria, and in the subsequent minor operations, turning the guns over to the Royal Artillery, and arriving back on board the “Doris” on October 7th, 1900.  After the battle of Paardeberg General Piet Cronje, his wife, grandson, aide-de-camp, and adjutant were held onboard the flagship “Doris” for about six weeks, previous to their transportation to the Island of St. Helena.  They lived in the Commander-in-Chief’s suite of cabins.  The dress worn by Mrs. Cronje on arrival was badly stained with picric acid, from the bursting of lyddite shell over the trenches, in which she had lain with a noteworthy gallantry. 

HMS Eclipse

HMS Eclipse.

HMS Eclipse.

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Crew of HMS Eclipse on the China Station in 1902.

Contributed by Roger Jones.

HMS Eclipse - Name History

The seventh “ECLIPSE” is an 11-gun twin-screw cruiser, launched at Portsmouth in 1894.  She is of 5600 tons, 9600 horse-power, and 19.5 knots speed.  Her length, beam, and draught were 350ft., 53ft., and 20ft.  This vessel became a sea-going training ship for Naval cadets.

HMS Juno

Displacement: 5600 tons.    I.H.P: c.8,000    Length: 350 feet.    Beam: 53 ft 6 ins.   Depth: 20 ft 6 ins.    Speed: c.18.5 knots.     Complement: 450.

HMS Juno - Name History

The eighth “JUNO” is an 11-gun twin-screw cruiser, launched at Barrow in 1895.  She is of 5600 tons, 9600 horse-power, and 19 knots speed.  Her length, beam, and draught were 350ft., 54ft., and 21ft.  In 1901 the “Juno,” commanded by Captain H.O. Routh, was employed as escort to H.M.S. “Ophir” during the tour of Their Royal Highnesses the Duke and Duchess of Cornwall and York (now their Majesties King George V. and Queen Mary) to the colonies.  In 1912 and 1913 the “Juno” acted as a parent ship of two of the torpedo-boat destroyer flotillas at Harwich.

HMS Juno. 

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HMS Juno.

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HMS Juno.

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HMS Juno.

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Captain G H Cherry ad the officers of HMS Juno c.1900. Captain Cherry was replaced by Captain H P Routh later in this year.

Crew of HMS Juno.  Photograph taken during the First World War.

Sent in by Michael Hearn, whose grandfather served on the ship.

HMS Minerva

Displacement: 5600 tons.    I.H.P: c.8,000    Length: 350 feet.    Beam: 53 ft 6 ins.   Depth: 20 ft 6 ins.    Speed: c.18.5 knots.     Complement: 450.

HMS Minerva with HMS Rainbow and HMS Hyacinth behind her at the Royal Review in 1902.

HMS Minerva pictured c.1908. 

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HMS Minerva c.1902

Captain F O Pike and the officers of the Minerva. Some of these officers were transferred from HMS Champion.

HMS Venus

Displacement: 5600 tons.    I.H.P: c.8,000    Length: 350 feet.    Beam: 53 ft 6 ins.   Depth: 20 ft 6 ins.    Speed: c.18.5 knots.     Complement: 450.

HMS Venus pictured c.1908. 

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HMS Talbot

Displacement: 5600 tons.    I.H.P: c.8,000    Length: 350 feet.    Beam: 53 ft 6 ins.   Depth: 20 ft 6 ins.    Speed: c.18.5 knots.     Complement: 450.

The second-class cruiser Talbot was commissioned for the North America and West Indies Station on September 15th by Captain Edward H Gamble who had previously commanded Raleigh, St George and Endymion. The Talbot was a new type of ship which was only 10 ft shorter than the first-class cruisers of the Edgar class and she was also one knot faster.

HMS Talbot pictured c.1908. 

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HMS Talbot 

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HMS Talbot, 1897

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HMS Talbot c.1915

HMS Talbot.

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HMS Talbot.

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Serving Out a Day's Fresh Meat Ration 1896

The photograph shows the butcher of the Talbot cutting up a day's provision of meat, while the ship's steward weighs a piece which is being carefully observed by that "cook of the mess" who is standing by with his tin dish ready to receive it. Close at hand is the officer of the day (Lieut Paton) who is on the spot to inspect the quality of the provisions. In harbour - the Talbot was at Devonport when this photograph was taken in 1896 - one pound of fresh meat was issued to each man every day. At sea, the meat rations were: every other day, one pound of salt pork; on one alternate day, one pound of salt beef; on the other alternate day, three-quarters of a pound of preserved meat.

The Company of the Talbot 1896

The company are grouped on the forecastle and the rigging. They numbered 412 all told, and was usual for ships going abroad for a three year commission, are mostly young men and therefore better suited to learn their work quickly and well.

Captain E H Gamble and Officers of the Talbot 1896

On the Captains right is Lieutenant J B Finlaison, R.M.L.I., who was in command of the Marine detachment on board, and on the Captain's left is Commander Lewis Bayly, the executive officer of the ship.

 
 

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 US Air Force F15 Eagle over flys British Challenger Tank during the Gulf War.
Gulf Buddies by Geoff Lea.
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 With Italys entry into WW II on June 10, 1940, the epic two-and-one-half-year siege of Malta began. Symbolizing the defiant resistance of the people and defenders of that tiny island, the legend of Faith, Hope, and Charity grew from a handful of Gloster Sea Gladiators which initially comprised Maltas sole aerial defense. Until the arrival of the more modern Hawker Hurricanes, these obsolescent biplanes fought the Regia Aeronautica alone in the skies above Malta. Only six or seven Gladiators were assembled from the shipment of eighteen crated aircraft which had been delivered by the HMS Glorious. Others were utilized for spare parts, and three had been dispatched, still crated, to Egypt. Though hugely outnumbered, the defenders fought on, raising the morale of the citizens of Malta, and denying the Italians mastery of the sky. Suffering from a constant shortage of spare parts, tools and equipment, the devoted ground support crews were never able to keep more than three Gladiators operational at any point in time. Only one of these Gladiators was totally lost in aerial combat, and the sole surviving aircraft was presented to the people of Malta, and today stands in their National War Museum as a proud symbol of courage and endurance. In Stan Stokes painting, a Sea Gladiator, piloted by Flight Lt. James Pickering, tangles with a Fiat C.R. 42 over Malta in 1940 while an Italian Savoia S.79 tri-engined bomber passes by in the background. The Gloster Gladiator represented the zenith of development of the classic biplane fighter aircraft, a design formula which characterized an entire era from WW I until the advent of the monoplane fighter just before WW II. Glosters naval model of the Gladiator was equipped with a Bristol Mercury VIIIA engine providing a maximum speed of 253 MPH, a rate of climb of 2300 feet per minute, an operational ceiling of 32,200 feet, and a range of 415 miles. The Gladiator was armed with four .303 inch Browning machine guns, and incorporated several advanced features including an enclosed cockpit and wing flaps. One top RAF ace, Sqd. Ldr. Pattle, attained eleven victories flying the Gladiator. A total of 527 Gladiators were produced, and the aircraft served in twelve different countries. The Italians were overly persistent in their emphasis on biplane fighters, stemming from their successes with these highly maneuverable machines during the Spanish Civil War. Employing distinctive Warren-truss type interplane bracing the C.R. 42 was powered by a Fiat A74 R.C. 38 engine providing a maximum speed of 274 MPH and a range of 485 miles. The C.R. 42 was more lightly armed than the Gladiators it opposed, possessing only two 12.7mm Breda machine guns. The C.R 42 served on all of Italys fronts including North and East Africa, France, Britain, the Balkans, and Russia. Exported to Hungary, Sweden and Belgium, the C.R. 42 ironically served alongside the Gladiator in other theaters of operation during WW II.
Faith Hope and Charity by Stan Stokes. (C)
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 After service in the 96th Infantry Regiment, Smirnov joined the XIX Corps Air Squadron in 1914, shooting down twelve enemy aircraft in the course of two years. When revolution swept through Russia in November 1917, he escaped the Bolsheviks via a White counter-revolutionary route, eventually joining the RAF in England, serving at the Central Flying School at Upavon. He is shown here in his silver Nieuport 17, having just despatched a Roland C.II.

Captain Ivan Smirnov by Ivan Berryman.
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 This aircraft is credited with flying 126 missions without an abort for the 447th Bomb Group and was one of only three original aircraft to survive the war and return to the US.  To the left can be seen the famous A Bit O Lace.  All these aircraft were based at Rattlesden.  The scene is early 1945, the aircraft flying out to bomb rail marshalling yards.

Scheherazade by Tim Fisher.
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 No one will ever know exactly what caused Max Immelmanns demise, but what is known is that his propeller was seen to disintegrate, which caused a series violent oscillations that ripped the Fokker E.III apart, the tail breaking away before the wings folded back, trapping the young German ace in his cockpit. The popular belief is that his interrupter gear malfunctioned, causing him to shoot away part of his own propeller, but British reports attribute Immelmanns loss to the gunnery of Cpl J H Waller from the nose of FE.2b 6346 flown by 2Lt G R McCubbin on Sunday, 18th June 1916. Immelmann was flying the spare E.III 246/16 as his own E.IV had been badly shot up earlier that day.

Immelmanns Last Flight by Ivan Berryman.
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 Dedicated to those who served and died in the Battle of Britain on the ground and in the air during the summer of 1940.

A Nation Alone by Ivan Berryman.
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 High in its element, a lone BAE Lightning F.6 glints in the evening sunshine as it returns from a sortie over the North Sea in the late 1970s.

The Sentinel by Ivan Berryman.
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In the early summer of 1944 the Me 262 became the worlds first operational jet aircraft. With a top speed of 540 mph it easily outperformed any Allied aircraft of WWII, and went on to revolutionise aerial warfare. A truly remarkable aircraft.
Luftwaffe Messerschmitt Me262A-1a by Barry Price.
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 A swordfish from HMS Warspite on patrol off the coast of Egypt, near the port of Alexandria.

Out of Alex by David Pentland.
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 D for Donald of 270 squadron, Royal Air Force, out of Freetown, West Africa operating in the Atlantic Ocean. It was during routine operation search that D for Donald surprised U515 on the surface and immediately attacked the submarine. U515 in putting up stiff resistance blew a large hole in the hull of D for Donald and the magazine of the starboard side 0.5 twin Browning was hit and the subsequent shrapnel wounded both blister gunners. U515 escaped but was sunk by an American naval hunter group a year later. D for Donald limped back to base and managed to make the beach before it would sink completely.
Catalina Attack by John Wynne Hopkins (P)
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 Under lowering arctic skies HMS Belfast (Admiral Burnets Flagship) leads HMS Sheffield and HMS Norfolk in the race to protect convoy JW55B from Scharnhorst.

HMS Belfast During the Battle of North Cape by Randall Wilson. (Y)
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HMS Celandine flower class corvette escorting Atlantic convoy in the middle distance the carrier HMS Biter is shown.
HMS Celandine by Ivan Berryman. (AP)
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 The Last of the heavy Cruisers built by Germany (5 in total) The picture shows Admiral Hipper making her first sortie on the 18th February 1940, accompanied by the Scharnhorst and the Gneisenau on Operation Nordmark. (Search for allied convoys on the route between Britain and Norway)

The Narvik Squadron by Anthony Saunders.
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 Between 24th may and 4th June 1940 an extraordinary armada of craft, large and small, naval and civilian, embarked on one of the greatest rescue missions in history. the evacuation of 330,000 British and French troops from the beaches of Dunkirk in northern France. the destroyer HMS Wakeful dominates the foreground here as troops pour onto the beaches and harbour moles in search of salvation. Both Wakeful and distant HMS Grafton were lost during the evacuation.

Dunkirk by Ivan Berryman.
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The cruiser HMS Frobisher dominates this scene off Houlgate at the Normandy landings of 1944.  The monitor HMS Roberts lies beyond Frobisher with a Large Infantry Landing Ship or LSI (L) unshipping its LCAs on the extreme right of the picture.  In the foreground, a motor launch attends a group of LCP (L)s as they head for the French beaches.  Two Spitfire Mk.IXs conduct sweeps overhead as Operation Neptune gathers momentum.

HMS Frobisher and HMS Roberts at Normandy by Ivan Berryman (P)
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 Launched on the Clyde on 1st February 2006, HMS Daring was the first of six Type 45 AAW destroyers ordered for the Royal Navy, the type representing a massive leap forward in technology and capability.  HMS Daring was officially handed over to the Royal Navy on 10th December 2008 and is depicted here in liaison with a Merlin helicopter.

HMS Daring by Ivan Berryman. (P)
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 At about 2.00pm the Union Brigade crashes through the ranks on Napoleons Ist Infantry Corps. The 2nd Royal North British Dragoons (later known as The Scots Greys) on the far left of the line, plow through Marcognets division, only Duruttes division will escape intact. With Brigade General Ponsortby at their head, elements of the now disordered Cavalry charge on to the French artillery.  Even though, at close quarters, the Gunners and attached Infantry are no match for the wild Scots, they desperately try to save their 12 pounder field pieces. However the British heavy Cavalry is now out of control and Napoleons retribution will be swift.  From the undulating ground before Paillotte comes the thunder of hooves and the deadly lances of 4th Regiment and the 3th Chasseurs a Cheval. In the confusion many of the British soldiers are completely unaware of the onslaught as the fresh French Cavalry sweeps through their flank.  Ponsonbys mount leaps through the mud as the exhausted Brigade is herded together for the final kill.  Even against all odds the brave men continue to fight. The Brigade General himself will shortly be sabred by Sergeant Urban as he attempts to capture the eagle of the 4th Lancers.

Charge of the Union Brigade by Mark Churms. (P)
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 Depicting Polish Lancers escorting a generals carriage as they pass through an infantry bivouac during the Hundred Days Campaign.

The Generals Escort by Mark Churms. (Y)
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VAR126. Jamiesons Last Stand, Battle of Doornkop 2nd January 1896 by Caton Woodville
Jamiesons Last Stand, Battle of Doornkop 2nd January 1896 by Richard Caton Woodville
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Battle between Greek and Turk forces at the battle of Klisswa, Epiris 1792.
Battle of Klisswa by Dennis Dighton.
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DHM594.  17th Light Dragoons, 1780 by Jim Lancia.
17th Light Dragoons, 1780 by Jim Lancia.
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 Napoleons farewell to Josephine.
My Destiny and France by Laslett Pott (GS)
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Driven by revenge for the brutal treatment she had suffered at the hands of the Romans, Queen Boadicea led the Iceni and her allies the Trinovantas in open revolt. The IX Legion Hispania was despatched to suppress the insurrection but were ambushed en route. Only the commander Petilius Cerealis, and a handful of cavalry escaped.

Ambush of the XI Legion by Brian Palmer.
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DHM206. Napoleon by Ernest Crofts.

Napoleon by Ernest Crofts.
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 The Intercontinental Formula was first organised by British Racing Drivers Club to allow the racing of cars with 2000cc to 3000cc engines. At the time the 1500cc limit of Formula 1 had been instituted by the international ruling body in the belief that the smaller cars would mean safer racing. In reality this meant that the relatively easy to handle Formula 1 cars could be driven by less experienced drivers almost as fast as the most experienced master drivers. The result was that the car with fractionally more power was the deciding factor in winning the race, rather than the better driver but this also compromised track safety. The introduction of the Intercontinental Formula was seen as more of a challenge for the drivers, with the larger and more powerful cars requiring greater skill and experience than to drive the 1500cc cars of Formula 1. The 13th International Trophy on Saturday 6th May 1961 was the first race of the season to carry World Championship points and consisted of 80 laps of Silverstone, a total of 233 miles. Stirling Moss, having already won the International Sports Car Race in a Lotus earlier that day, was driving Rob Walkers 2.5 litre Cooper Climax and qualified 2nd on the grid despite being unhappy with the steering of his car. The starting grid front row was Bruce McLaren, Stirling Moss, Jack Brabham and Graham Hill and by the time the race started at 2.30pm a heavy rain meant that the track was not only soaked but also covered in oil and rubber from the previous races. World Champion Jack Brabham made a superb start, passed Moss and was first into Copse and by lap 4 Moss was in 3rd place led by Surtees and Brabham. Due to appalling conditions and poor visibility many of the cars were spinning or leaving the track and by lap 13 Brabham and Moss were 1st and 2nd with the rest of the field some distance behind. Moss now poured on the pressure and for the next few laps he tried to pass as he harried Brabham in a duel for the lead. The pair were now beginning to lap the tailenders and, at around a quarter of the distance Moss was held up by Flockhart, Brabhams team member, who had allowed Brabham to pass. Moss gestured angrily to Flockhart as he was unable to follow Brabham and, as the rain paused for a while the pace became faster. Suddenly and quite dramatically Moss passed both Flockhart and Brabham and within 2 laps had gained 5 seconds on the World Champion. As the rain returned in a deluge Moss mercilessly pushed on, increasing his lead to 1.5 minutes by the halfway mark. Although he could have taken things easily at this point Moss drove on relentlessly at a seemingly impossible pace and was now lapping most of the field for a second time. By the ¾ stage he completed his humiliation of Brabham by passing him for a second time to lap him representing a 3 mile lead. Moss eventually won the race in 2hrs 41 mins 19.2 secs, 1.5 laps ahead of Brabham and at least two laps ahead of the rest of the field in what were treacherous conditions. At the end of the race Moss summed up the experience as a nice ride, having proved himself to be one of the greatest and fastest drivers in the world under any conditions. Sir Stirling Moss believes this to be one of his finest ever drives.

A Moment of Triumph by Gerald Coulson. (Y)
Half Price! - £75.00
SFA18.  Going Home by Chris Howells.

Going Home by Chris Howells.
Half Price! - £65.00
MC0041P. Blitzkrieg by Mark Churms.

Blitzkrieg by Mark Churms. (P)
Half Price! - £1250.00
The legendary Welsh rugby union captain Gareth Edwards is brought to life in the triple portrait. Gareth Edwards is revered in Wales and considered one of the finest players ever. in part of the montage he is shown going over for a try against England.
Gareth Edwards by Darren Baker. (Y)
Half Price! - £75.00

B50. Jean Alesi/ Ferrari 412 by Ivan Berryman.

Jean Alesi/ Ferrari 412 by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £40.00
Steeplechasers competing for the Blue Riband.

Chasing for Gold by Chris Howells.
Half Price! - £65.00
PDB3.  Lenox Lewis II by Peter Deighan.
Lenox Lewis II by Peter Deighan.
Half Price! - £41.00
SPC5008. Neil Lennon by Gary Brandham.

Neil Lennon by Gary Brandham.
Half Price! - £47.00

Everything we obtain for this site is shown on the site, we do not have any more photos, crew lists or further information on any of the ships.

COPYRIGHT NOTICE. ALL IMAGES DISPLAYED ON THIS WEBSITE ARE PROTECTED BY  COPYRIGHT  LAW, AND ARE OWNED BY CRANSTON FINE ARTS OR THEIR RESPECTIVE OWNERS.  NO REPRODUCTION OR COPYING ALLOWED ON OTHER WEBSITES, BOOKS OR ARTICLES WITHOUT PRIOR AGREEMENT.

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