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Eclipse class masted cruisers of the Royal Navy launched from 1875-77. Ships in the class were HMS Eclipse, HMS Diana, HMS Dido, HMS Doris, HMS Isis, HMS Juno, HMS Minerva, HMS Talbot and HMS Venus.  ordered under the Spencer naval programme of 1893. These second class cruisers had a laregr dispalcement than previous 2nd class cruisers and also a heavier calibre of armament.

HMS Diana was built at Fairfields and laid down on the 13th August 1894, being launched 5th December 1895. completed for service 15th June 1897.  She serve din the Mediterranean until 1913 and transferred back the the UK to the 3rd Fleet at Devonport. At the outbreak of war HMS Diana joined the The Cruiser Force G in the English Channel. and on the 6tyh August captured A German Schooner. In February 1915  she joined the 12th cruiser squadron and was transferred in November 1915 to the China Station until August 1917, moving to the red Sea and Indian Ocean until the end of the war. In June 1919 she was paid off at Queenstown and scrapped in 1920

HMS Dido was built at London and Glasgow and laid down on the 30th August 1894, being launched 20th March 1896. completed for service 10th May 1898. In 1907 HMS Dido joined the the Channel Fleet then in 1909  joined the Home Fleet at the Nore. 1sr battle squadron in 1909 - 1910 and then went to Chatham for refit. In September 1911 joined the Home fleet at the Nore again

HMS Doris was built at Barrow by Naval Construction and Armaments Company and laid down on the 29th August 1894, being launched 3rd March 1896. completed for service 18th November 1897.

HMS Juno was built at Barrow by Naval Construction and Armaments Company and laid down on the 22nd June 1894, being launched 16th November 1895. completed for service 16th June 1897.

Displacement: 5600 tons.    I.H.P: c.8,000    Length: 350 feet.    Beam: 53 ft 6 ins.   Depth: 20 ft 6 ins.    Speed: c.18.5 knots.     Complement: 450.

HMS Diana 5th December 1895 Sold for scrap in 1920.
HMS Dido 20th March 1896 Sold for scrap in 1926.
HMS Doris 3rd March 1896 Sold for scrap in 1919.
HMS Eclipse 19th July 1894 Sold in 1921.
HMS Isis 27th June 1896 Sold for scrap in 1920.
HMS Juno 16th November 1895 Sold for scrap in 1920.
HMS Minerva 23rd September 1895 Sold in 1920.
HMS Venus 5th September 1895 Sold in 1921.
HMS Talbot 25th April 1895 Sold for scrap in 1921.
HMS Diana

HMS Diana was built at Fairfields and laid down on the 13th August 1894, being launched 5th December 1895. completed for service 15th June 1897.  She serve din the Mediterranean until 1913 and transferred back the the UK to the 3rd Fleet at Devonport. At the outbreak of war HMS Diana joined the The Cruiser Force G in the English Channel. and on the 6tyh August captured A German Schooner. In February 1915  she joined the 12th cruiser squadron and was transferred in November 1915 to the China Station until August 1917, moving to the red Sea and Indian Ocean until the end of the war. In June 1919 she was paid off at Queenstown and scrapped in 1920

Displacement: 5600 tons.    I.H.P: c.8,000    Length: 350 feet.    Beam: 53 ft 6 ins.   Depth: 20 ft 6 ins.    Speed: c.18.5 knots.     Complement: 450.

HMS Diana.

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HMS Diana.

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HMS Diana anchored in Malta's Grand Harbour in 1919.

Commander Halsey's Navy Eight from HMS Diana - winners of the United Service Challenge Cup in 1902.

HMS Diana - Name History

The eleventh “DIANA” is an 11-gun twin-screw cruiser launched at Govan in 1895.  She is of 5600 tons, 9600 horse-power, and 19 knots speed.  Her length, beam, and draught were 350ft., 54ft., and 21ft. 

HMS Dido

Displacement: 5600 tons.    I.H.P: c.8,000    Length: 350 feet.    Beam: 53 ft 6 ins.   Depth: 20 ft 6 ins.    Speed: c.18.5 knots.     Complement: 450.

HMS Dido

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HMS Dido at speed

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HMS Dido

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HMS Dido - Name History

The fifth “DIDO” is an 11-gun twin-screw cruiser launched at Glasgow in 1896.  She is of 5600 tons, 9600 horse-power, and 19.5 knots speed.  Her length, beam, and draught were 350ft., 54ft., and 21ft. At her launch on March 17th an unusual accident occurred.  As the ship was moving into the water the ground under the ways suddenly sank, and the ship was thrown out of the cradle, sustaining serious damage.  She lay half in and half out of the water for three days before she was finally floated.  In 1900 the “Dido,” commanded by Captain Philip Francis Tillard, played a minor part in the third China War or Boxer Riots.  

HMS Doris

Displacement: 5600 tons.    I.H.P: c.8,000    Length: 350 feet.    Beam: 53 ft 6 ins.   Depth: 20 ft 6 ins.    Speed: c.18.5 knots.     Complement: 450.

HMS Doris.

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HMS Doris.

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HMS Doris

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A Piper pictured on HMS Doris c.1904

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HMS Doris

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HMS Doris - Name History

The fourth ”DORIS” is an 11-gun twin-screw cruiser launched at Barrow in 1896.  She is of 5600 tons, 9600 horse-power, and 19.5 knots speed.  Her length, beam, and draught were 350ft., 54ft., and 21ft.  In 1899 and 1900 the “Doris,” commanded by Captain Reginald C. Prothero, and flying the flag of Rear-Admiral Sir Robert Harris, played an important part in the second Boer War.  On November 19th the “Doris” contributed to a Naval Brigade of 350 men, commanded by Captain Reginald C. Prothero, which proceeded to the front, and three days later joined General Lord Methuen at Belmont.  On November 25th the Naval Brigade fought at the battle of graspan.  The men paraded at 5a.m. and after the kopje had been shelled the seamen and marines, led by the flag Captain, advanced on the enemy’s position.  The Boers opened a heavy fire at 600 yards and soon supplemented it with a cross fire.  Nevertheless the brigade advanced steadily by rushes, and in spite of a loss of 15 killed and 79 wounded gained the summit of the kopje, driving the Boers thence in full retreat.  So many officers had been killed and wounded, among the latter Flag Captain Prothero, that the command of the Naval Brigade developed upon Captain Alfred Edmund Marchant, R. M. L. I., who was once promoted to the rank of major.  Thus, for the first time for many years, a Naval Brigade, composed of both Bluejackets and marines, had the honour of being commanded by an officer of the Royal Marines.  A feature of the attack was the bravery of Midshipman Cymbeline Huddart of the “Doris,” who, though twice hit, courageously pressed forward until mortally wounded.  Her Majesty the late Queen Victoria was pleased to honour the Naval Brigade by telegraphing her congratulations on its gallantry, and Lord Methuen paid it a special visit and complimented it on its splendid behaviour.  On December 14th the Naval guns were in action bombarding the Boer positions at Modder River, and a Naval searchlight worked by Midshipman James Menzies of the “Doris” got into communication with the beleagured town of Kimberley.  In February two 4.7-guns proceeded to the front under Commander William Lowther Grant of the “Doris,” and subsequently took part in the battle of Paardeberg and the capture of General Cronje.  This party assisted in the capture of Bloemfontein, and suffered very severely indeed from enteric fever, no fewer than 89 officers and men being taken ill there.  They assisted in the capture of Johannesburg and of Pretoria, and in the subsequent minor operations, turning the guns over to the Royal Artillery, and arriving back on board the “Doris” on October 7th, 1900.  After the battle of Paardeberg General Piet Cronje, his wife, grandson, aide-de-camp, and adjutant were held onboard the flagship “Doris” for about six weeks, previous to their transportation to the Island of St. Helena.  They lived in the Commander-in-Chief’s suite of cabins.  The dress worn by Mrs. Cronje on arrival was badly stained with picric acid, from the bursting of lyddite shell over the trenches, in which she had lain with a noteworthy gallantry. 

HMS Eclipse

HMS Eclipse.

HMS Eclipse.

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Crew of HMS Eclipse on the China Station in 1902.

Contributed by Roger Jones.

HMS Eclipse - Name History

The seventh “ECLIPSE” is an 11-gun twin-screw cruiser, launched at Portsmouth in 1894.  She is of 5600 tons, 9600 horse-power, and 19.5 knots speed.  Her length, beam, and draught were 350ft., 53ft., and 20ft.  This vessel became a sea-going training ship for Naval cadets.

HMS Juno

Displacement: 5600 tons.    I.H.P: c.8,000    Length: 350 feet.    Beam: 53 ft 6 ins.   Depth: 20 ft 6 ins.    Speed: c.18.5 knots.     Complement: 450.

HMS Juno - Name History

The eighth “JUNO” is an 11-gun twin-screw cruiser, launched at Barrow in 1895.  She is of 5600 tons, 9600 horse-power, and 19 knots speed.  Her length, beam, and draught were 350ft., 54ft., and 21ft.  In 1901 the “Juno,” commanded by Captain H.O. Routh, was employed as escort to H.M.S. “Ophir” during the tour of Their Royal Highnesses the Duke and Duchess of Cornwall and York (now their Majesties King George V. and Queen Mary) to the colonies.  In 1912 and 1913 the “Juno” acted as a parent ship of two of the torpedo-boat destroyer flotillas at Harwich.

HMS Juno. 

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HMS Juno.

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HMS Juno.

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HMS Juno.

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Captain G H Cherry ad the officers of HMS Juno c.1900. Captain Cherry was replaced by Captain H P Routh later in this year.

Crew of HMS Juno.  Photograph taken during the First World War.

Sent in by Michael Hearn, whose grandfather served on the ship.

HMS Minerva

Displacement: 5600 tons.    I.H.P: c.8,000    Length: 350 feet.    Beam: 53 ft 6 ins.   Depth: 20 ft 6 ins.    Speed: c.18.5 knots.     Complement: 450.

HMS Minerva with HMS Rainbow and HMS Hyacinth behind her at the Royal Review in 1902.

HMS Minerva pictured c.1908. 

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HMS Minerva c.1902

Captain F O Pike and the officers of the Minerva. Some of these officers were transferred from HMS Champion.

HMS Venus

Displacement: 5600 tons.    I.H.P: c.8,000    Length: 350 feet.    Beam: 53 ft 6 ins.   Depth: 20 ft 6 ins.    Speed: c.18.5 knots.     Complement: 450.

HMS Venus pictured c.1908. 

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HMS Talbot

Displacement: 5600 tons.    I.H.P: c.8,000    Length: 350 feet.    Beam: 53 ft 6 ins.   Depth: 20 ft 6 ins.    Speed: c.18.5 knots.     Complement: 450.

The second-class cruiser Talbot was commissioned for the North America and West Indies Station on September 15th by Captain Edward H Gamble who had previously commanded Raleigh, St George and Endymion. The Talbot was a new type of ship which was only 10 ft shorter than the first-class cruisers of the Edgar class and she was also one knot faster.

HMS Talbot pictured c.1908. 

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HMS Talbot 

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HMS Talbot, 1897

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HMS Talbot c.1915

HMS Talbot.

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HMS Talbot.

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Serving Out a Day's Fresh Meat Ration 1896

The photograph shows the butcher of the Talbot cutting up a day's provision of meat, while the ship's steward weighs a piece which is being carefully observed by that "cook of the mess" who is standing by with his tin dish ready to receive it. Close at hand is the officer of the day (Lieut Paton) who is on the spot to inspect the quality of the provisions. In harbour - the Talbot was at Devonport when this photograph was taken in 1896 - one pound of fresh meat was issued to each man every day. At sea, the meat rations were: every other day, one pound of salt pork; on one alternate day, one pound of salt beef; on the other alternate day, three-quarters of a pound of preserved meat.

The Company of the Talbot 1896

The company are grouped on the forecastle and the rigging. They numbered 412 all told, and was usual for ships going abroad for a three year commission, are mostly young men and therefore better suited to learn their work quickly and well.

Captain E H Gamble and Officers of the Talbot 1896

On the Captains right is Lieutenant J B Finlaison, R.M.L.I., who was in command of the Marine detachment on board, and on the Captain's left is Commander Lewis Bayly, the executive officer of the ship.

 
 

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AVIATION PRINTS

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Mosquitos of 105 Squadron, Marham.  No. 105 Squadron, stationed at Marham, Norfolk, became the first Royal Air Force unit to become operational flying the Mosquito B. Mk. IV bomber on 11th April 1942.  The painting shows 105 Squadron on the raid of 10th April 1945, to the Wahren railway marshalling yards at Leipzig, Germany.

Return From Leipzig by Anthony Saunders. (C)
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 A Mosquito Mk.BIX above the clouds in late 1943.  Mosquito B.IX LR503 holds the record for the most combat missions flown by a single Allied bomber in the Second World War, serving 213 sorties.

A De Havilland Beauty by Ivan Berryman.
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 Hurricane Mk.IIC Z3971 of 253 Sqn, closing on a Heinkel 111.

Hurricane Mk.IIC by Ivan Berryman.
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 A pair of Spitfire Mk.IXs of 402 Squadron Royal Canadian Air Force, based at Kenley, practise combat manoeuvres in the skies above Kent in May, 1943.

Spitfire Alley by Ivan Berryman.
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 With a final 47 victories to his credit, Robert Alexander Little was one of the highest-scoring British aces of World War 1, beginning his career with the famous No 8 (Naval) Squadron in 1916, flying Sopwith Pup N5182, as shown here. On 21st April 1917, he was attacked and shot down by six aircraft of Jasta Boelke, Little being thrown from the cockpit of his Sopwith Camel on impact with the ground. As the German aircraft swooped in to rake the wreckage with machine gun fire, Little pulled his Webley from its holster and began returning fire before being assisted by British infantry with their Lewis guns. Such was the character of this great pilot who finally met his death whilst attacking Gotha bombers on the night of 27th May 1918.

Captain Robert Little by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
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 With his personal emblem of black and white fuselage band adorning his Fokker E.V, 153/18, Richard Wenzl briefly commanded Jasta 6, based at Bernes in August 1918, and claimed a modest 6 victories during his career with JG 1. The Fokker E.V was both fast and manoeuvrable, but a series of engine and structural failures meant that these exciting new machines saw only brief service before being re-worked to emerge as the D.VIII, sadly too late to make any impression on the war. Wenzl is shown here in combat with Sopwith Camels of 203 Sqn, assisted by Fokker D.VIIs, which served alongside the E.Vs of Jasta 6. The D.VII shown is that of Ltn d R Erich Just of Jasta 11, also based at Bernes.

Leutnant d R Richard Wenzl by Ivan Berryman.
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A Lysander of 161 Squadron from RAF Tempsford banks to port as it circles a field somewhere in France 1943. These missions only took place on or around the full moon period to pick up or drop off SOE agents with the help of the Resistance. 161 Squadron, the most secret of all RAF squadrons, had in its flight, Lysanders, Hudsons, and Halifaxes which carried out parachute operations. Two of 161s top pilots Hugh Verity and Lewis Hodges both received the DSO & bar and DFC & bar, and from France the Legion dHonneur and the Croix de Guerre.

Lysander Pick Up by Graeme Lothian.
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 The success of the attack on the Möhne dam on the night of 16th/17th May 1943 meant that the remaining three 617 Sqn Lancasters of the First Wave could turn their attention to the Eder, some twelve minutes flying time away.  Wing Commander Guy Gibson first called in Flight Lieutenant D J Shannon, flying AJ-L (ED929G) to make the initial run, but he had great difficulty achieving the correct height and approach, so Gibson now ordered Squadron Leader H E Maudslay in AJ-Z (ED937G) to make his run.  Again, the aircraft struggled to find the correct height and direction, so Shannon was again brought in, AJ-L finally releasing its <i>Upkeep</i> on the third attempt. The bomb bounced twice before exploding with no visible effect on the dam. Now Maudslay made another attempt, but released his bomb too late.  The mine bounced off of the dam wall and exploded in mid air right behind AJ-Z, the Lancaster limping away, damaged, from the scene, only to be shot down on the way home with the loss of all crew.  Finally, Pilot Officer Les Knight was called in for one final attempt. AJ-N (ED912G) released its <i>Upkeep</i>  perfectly, the mine bouncing three times before striking the dam slightly to the south.  In the ensuing explosion, the dam was seen to shake visibly before the masonry began to crumble and a massive breach appeared.  With the Möhne and Eder dams both destroyed and the Sorpe demonstrated to be equally vulnerable, <i>Operation Chastise</i> had been a remarkable success and will stand forever as one of the most heroic and audacious attacks in the history of aerial warfare.

The Eder Breaks by Ivan Berryman. (Y)
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 The destroyer HMS Kelly passes close to the old carrier HMS Eagle as she escorts a convoy in the Mediterranean early in 1941.

HMS Kelly by Ivan Berryman.
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 The third of the Royal Navy's Vanguard class submarines, HMS Vigilant (S30) entered service on 2nd November 1996.  She is based at HMNB Clyde at Faslane and carries the UK's nuclear deterrent Trident ballistic missile.  Manned by a crew of 14 officers and 121 men, her main power is supplied by one Rolls Royce PWR2 nuclear reactor driving two GEC turbines.

HMS Vigilant by Ivan Berryman. (P)
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USS Oakland Escorting the Damaged USS Lexington by Ivan Berryman
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One of the finest battleships of all time, Bismarck was built by the Blohm and Voss shipyard in Hamburg and launched in February 1939.  Her first duty was for commerce raiding in the north Atlantic.  Together with the heavy cruiser Prinz Eugen, the destroyers Z10, Z16 and Z23 and a minesweeper.  The Bismarck, commanded by Vice Admiral Gunther Lutjens, left her last anchorage at Grimstadt Fjord in Norway.  Once Bismarcks departure was confirmed all available British forces were deployed to meet the threat.  On the 24th of May 1941 the Bismarck sailed into naval history - sinking the battlescruiser and pride of the British fleet - HMS Hood.  But Bismarck would have little time to celebrate, she was sunk by a scorned British fleet three days later.  Here Bismarck is depicted on the evening of the 21st May 1941 entering the open sea on her fateful final voyage.

Bismarck - The Final Voyage by Anthony Saunders (P)
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HMS Glowworm, burning severely after receiving hits from the mighty Admiral Hipper, is depicted turning to begin her heroic sacrifice off the Norwegian coast on 8th April 1940. Hugely out-gunned and already crippled, Glowworms captain, Lieutenant-Commander Roope rammed his destroyer into the side of the Admiral Hipper, inflicting a 40 metre rip in its armour belt before drifting away and exploding. 38 British sailors were rescued from the sea and Roope was awarded a posthumous VC for his bravery, the first earned by the Royal Navy in WWII.

The attack on the Admiral Hipper by HMS Glowworm by Ivan Berryman (Y)
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H.M.A.S Hobart glides past Mount Fiji for the surrender ceremony with Missouri in the Background. Tokyo Bay 1945.

Slow Ahead by Randall Wilson.
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HMS Thunderbolt by Ivan Berryman. The submarine HMS Thunderbolt moves away from the depot ship Montcalm.  Another submarine, HMS Swordfish is alongside for resupply.

HMS Thunderbolt by Ivan Berryman. (AP)
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 Spearheading the Falklands Task Force as it heads south in 1982, the carrier HMS Hermes is shown in company with two Type 21 frigates, HMS Arrow on the left and HMS Ardent in the near foreground.  In the far distance, HMS Glamorgan glints in the sun as Type 42 HMS Sheffield cuts across behind Hermes.

HMS Hermes by Ivan Berryman (AP)
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The British Troops resuming the attack on the Sikh Entrenched Camp.  Battle fought during the First Sikh War, by a force of 16,000 Anglo-Indian troops under the command of General Sir Hugh Gough.  On the evening of 21st December the British Force unsuccessfully attempted to take the Sikh entrenched position commanded by Lal Singh with an army of 50,000 Sikh troops.  When nightfall came the British retired overnight.  At dawn they attacked again, this time the Sikh line eventually collapsed and fled the field leaving behind 7,000 casualties.  British and Indian losses were 694 killed with 1,721 wounded.  This was one of the bloodiest battles in the east during the 19th century.

Battle of Ferozeshah by Henry Martens.
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DHM821.  Austrian Generals Watching the Battle by Albrecht Adam.
Austrian Generals Watching the Battle by Albrecht Adam.
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 British MK1 Grant tanks of the Staffordshire Yeomanry 8th Armoured Brigade, 10th Armoured Division, breakout from El Alamein.

Operation Supercharge, 4th November 1941 by David Pentland. (GS)
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 Battle of Agincourt, October 25th 1415. Fought during the Hundred years war at the end of the English Invasion of 1415. King Henry the V of England, after his conquest of Harfleur marched his army of 1,000 Knights and 5,000 Archers (many of which were Welsh) towards Calais. He marched to Amiens as flooding had affected the river at the Somme which was the direct route. This delay helped the French army of 20,000 strong under the command of the Constable Charles dAlbret and Marshal Jean Bouciquaut II. The French army blocked Henry V route to Calais, giving the English no choice but to fight. Henry V positioned his army at Agincourt, between to wooded areas giving a frontage of 1100 metres. Henry deployed his force into three divisions; each group had archers at each flank. He had chosen his position well, in front of his army was ploughed fields and due to the heavy raid was very muddy. Due to the narrow battlefield area the French army lost their advantage of superior numbers. At 11 oclock the English started to advance their archers within 2509 yards of the French, getting them into range of the French lines. The French line of Cavalry advanced at a slow pass due to the heavy mud, They took heavy losses from the arrows from the English Long Bowman. They were eventually repulsed by the Archers who as the French cavalry approached changed from using longbows for axes and swords. The French second Cavalry line advanced only to be finally repulsed after hand to hand fighting. The commander Duc dAlencon was killed in the attack. The second charge had failed and many of the French knights were taken prisoner. Believing he had been attacked in the rear Henry V ordered that the prisoners were to be put to death. In fact There was no real rear attack it was French Camp followers plundering the English Camp. The French camp followers were quickly dealt with and the English again prepared itself for the next attack. The third attack never materialized as the sight of so much blood shed and piles of corpses turned the charge into a retreat. The English had won the day with losses less than 1600 compared to the French losses of over 7,000, including the capture of Bouciquaut. Henry V, his way now cleared reached Calais on the 16th November 1415. Agincourt is one of the great battles of military history, and this victory enabled Henry V to return to France in 1417 and conquer all of Normandy.

Morning of Agincourt by Sir John Gilbert. (Y)
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 Displaying the captured standards from the Battles of Austerlitz and Ulm through the streets of Paris.
Remise Au Senat Des Trophees by Edouard Detaille. (Y)
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 Depicting Napoleon overlooking the arrival of the Guard Horse Artillery.

Arrival of the Horse Artillery at Eylau by Benigni. (Y)
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 The all time classic image of the disastrous Charge of the Light Brigade which included the 17th lancers, who lead the charge.

The Charge of the Light Brigade by Richard Caton Woodville (Y)
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The picture shows Prussian troops cheering the arrival of General von Bulow after they had routed the French army.

The Arrival of General von Bulow by Richard Knotel.
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The legendary Welsh rugby union captain Gareth Edwards is brought to life in the triple portrait. Gareth Edwards is revered in Wales and considered one of the finest players ever. in part of the montage he is shown going over for a try against England.
Gareth Edwards by Darren Baker. (Y)
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B41. Nigel Mansell, McLaren MP4/10/B by Ivan Berryman.

Nigel Mansell, McLaren MP4/10/B by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £40.00
This signed art print was produced at the end of 2000 after the Olympics of that year, and has been sold out from the publisher for many years.  We have the last few publishers proofs of this edition available.  This superb art print celebrates the ultimate achievement for any athlete, the winning of an Olympic gold medal.  In the modern era athletes from Great Britain have won 178 gold medals and Gary Keane's montage celebrates some of the highlights from those achievements.  It captures the determination and effort required to win, as well as the euphoria when the realisation that a life long dream has finally become a reality.  This print is not only a tribute to those featured but also to all other competitors and medal winners who have strived to bring glory and honour to Great Britain.  As the Olympic Games enter a new century and a new chapter in history, it is hoped that this reminder of past glories will also help to inspire those competing for gold in the future.  This limited edition print is signed by six gold medal winners : <br>LYNN DAVIES - 1964 TOKYO Men's Long Jump.<br>MARY PETERS - 1972 MUNICH Pentathlon.<br>DALEY THOMPSON - 1980 MOSCOW Decathlon & 1984 LOS ANGELES Decathlon.<br>TESSA SANDERSON - 1984 LOS ANGELES Javelin.<br>SALLY GUNNELL - 1992 BARCELONA 400 metre Hurdles.<br>STEVEN REDGRAVE - 1984 LOS ANGELES Rowing Coxed Fours, 1988 SEOUL Rowing Coxless Pairs, 1992 BARCELONA Rowing Coxless Pairs, 1996 ATLANTA Rowing Coxless Pairs (and since signing this print, also 2000 SYDNEY Rowing Coxless Fours).

British Olympic Legends by Gary Keane
Half Price! - £110.00
 England 53 - South Africa 3, Twickenham, Novermber 23rd 2002. England: Robinson, Cohen, Tindall, Greenwood, Christophers, Wilkinson, Dawson, Vickery, Leonard, Thompson, Johnson, Kay, Moody, Back, Hill. (Subs): Dallaglio, Gomersall, Healey, Morris, Regan, Stimpson. Scores: Try - Cohen, 2 Tries - Greenwood, Try - Back, Try - Hill, Try - Dallaglio, Penalty Try, 2 Penalties - Wilkinson, Conversion - Wilkinson, Conversion - Dawson, 2 Conversions - Gomersall, 2 Conversions - Stimpson. <br><br>South Africa: Greef, Paulse, Fleck, James, Lombard, Pretorius, Conradie, Roux, Dalton, Venter, Lambuschagne, Krige, Wannenburg, Van Niekerk. (Subs): Jacobs, Jordaan, Russell, Uys, Van Biljon, Van der Linde, Wentzel. Score : Penalty - Pretorius.

England v South Africa - Investec 2002 by Doug Harker. (Y)
Half Price! - £100.00

 On three occasions since their last Grand Slam in 1995 the England team had come within a whisker of completing another dream.  During this important build up towards the world cup England finally laid their ghost to rest.  After six years under the guidance of Head Coach Clive Woodward England, having beaten the big three from the Southern Hemisphere in a back-to-back series of matches at Twickenham, reached number one in the Zurich world ranking.  This Grand Slam, a wonderful achievement in itself, underlined Englands worldwide dominance.

2003 Grand Slam by James Owen. (Y)
Half Price! - £80.00
SP4AP.  Desert Orchid by Mark Churms.

Desert Orchid by Mark Churms (AP)
Half Price! - £50.00
 Eddie Irvine and Johnny Herbert.  Jaguar Cosworth R1s

Return of the Cat by Michael Thompson
Half Price! - £25.00

Legends of English Football by Robert Highton - Gold Edition. (Y)
Half Price! - £248.00

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