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Eclipse class masted cruisers of the Royal Navy launched from 1875-77. Ships in the class were HMS Eclipse, HMS Diana, HMS Dido, HMS Doris, HMS Isis, HMS Juno, HMS Minerva, HMS Talbot and HMS Venus.  ordered under the Spencer naval programme of 1893. These second class cruisers had a laregr dispalcement than previous 2nd class cruisers and also a heavier calibre of armament.

HMS Diana was built at Fairfields and laid down on the 13th August 1894, being launched 5th December 1895. completed for service 15th June 1897.  She serve din the Mediterranean until 1913 and transferred back the the UK to the 3rd Fleet at Devonport. At the outbreak of war HMS Diana joined the The Cruiser Force G in the English Channel. and on the 6tyh August captured A German Schooner. In February 1915  she joined the 12th cruiser squadron and was transferred in November 1915 to the China Station until August 1917, moving to the red Sea and Indian Ocean until the end of the war. In June 1919 she was paid off at Queenstown and scrapped in 1920

HMS Dido was built at London and Glasgow and laid down on the 30th August 1894, being launched 20th March 1896. completed for service 10th May 1898. In 1907 HMS Dido joined the the Channel Fleet then in 1909  joined the Home Fleet at the Nore. 1sr battle squadron in 1909 - 1910 and then went to Chatham for refit. In September 1911 joined the Home fleet at the Nore again

HMS Doris was built at Barrow by Naval Construction and Armaments Company and laid down on the 29th August 1894, being launched 3rd March 1896. completed for service 18th November 1897.

HMS Juno was built at Barrow by Naval Construction and Armaments Company and laid down on the 22nd June 1894, being launched 16th November 1895. completed for service 16th June 1897.

Displacement: 5600 tons.    I.H.P: c.8,000    Length: 350 feet.    Beam: 53 ft 6 ins.   Depth: 20 ft 6 ins.    Speed: c.18.5 knots.     Complement: 450.

HMS Diana 5th December 1895 Sold for scrap in 1920.
HMS Dido 20th March 1896 Sold for scrap in 1926.
HMS Doris 3rd March 1896 Sold for scrap in 1919.
HMS Eclipse 19th July 1894 Sold in 1921.
HMS Isis 27th June 1896 Sold for scrap in 1920.
HMS Juno 16th November 1895 Sold for scrap in 1920.
HMS Minerva 23rd September 1895 Sold in 1920.
HMS Venus 5th September 1895 Sold in 1921.
HMS Talbot 25th April 1895 Sold for scrap in 1921.
HMS Diana

HMS Diana was built at Fairfields and laid down on the 13th August 1894, being launched 5th December 1895. completed for service 15th June 1897.  She serve din the Mediterranean until 1913 and transferred back the the UK to the 3rd Fleet at Devonport. At the outbreak of war HMS Diana joined the The Cruiser Force G in the English Channel. and on the 6tyh August captured A German Schooner. In February 1915  she joined the 12th cruiser squadron and was transferred in November 1915 to the China Station until August 1917, moving to the red Sea and Indian Ocean until the end of the war. In June 1919 she was paid off at Queenstown and scrapped in 1920

Displacement: 5600 tons.    I.H.P: c.8,000    Length: 350 feet.    Beam: 53 ft 6 ins.   Depth: 20 ft 6 ins.    Speed: c.18.5 knots.     Complement: 450.

HMS Diana.

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HMS Diana.

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HMS Diana anchored in Malta's Grand Harbour in 1919.

Commander Halsey's Navy Eight from HMS Diana - winners of the United Service Challenge Cup in 1902.

HMS Diana - Name History

The eleventh “DIANA” is an 11-gun twin-screw cruiser launched at Govan in 1895.  She is of 5600 tons, 9600 horse-power, and 19 knots speed.  Her length, beam, and draught were 350ft., 54ft., and 21ft. 

HMS Dido

Displacement: 5600 tons.    I.H.P: c.8,000    Length: 350 feet.    Beam: 53 ft 6 ins.   Depth: 20 ft 6 ins.    Speed: c.18.5 knots.     Complement: 450.

HMS Dido

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HMS Dido at speed

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HMS Dido

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HMS Dido - Name History

The fifth “DIDO” is an 11-gun twin-screw cruiser launched at Glasgow in 1896.  She is of 5600 tons, 9600 horse-power, and 19.5 knots speed.  Her length, beam, and draught were 350ft., 54ft., and 21ft. At her launch on March 17th an unusual accident occurred.  As the ship was moving into the water the ground under the ways suddenly sank, and the ship was thrown out of the cradle, sustaining serious damage.  She lay half in and half out of the water for three days before she was finally floated.  In 1900 the “Dido,” commanded by Captain Philip Francis Tillard, played a minor part in the third China War or Boxer Riots.  

HMS Doris

Displacement: 5600 tons.    I.H.P: c.8,000    Length: 350 feet.    Beam: 53 ft 6 ins.   Depth: 20 ft 6 ins.    Speed: c.18.5 knots.     Complement: 450.

HMS Doris.

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HMS Doris.

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HMS Doris

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A Piper pictured on HMS Doris c.1904

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HMS Doris

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HMS Doris - Name History

The fourth ”DORIS” is an 11-gun twin-screw cruiser launched at Barrow in 1896.  She is of 5600 tons, 9600 horse-power, and 19.5 knots speed.  Her length, beam, and draught were 350ft., 54ft., and 21ft.  In 1899 and 1900 the “Doris,” commanded by Captain Reginald C. Prothero, and flying the flag of Rear-Admiral Sir Robert Harris, played an important part in the second Boer War.  On November 19th the “Doris” contributed to a Naval Brigade of 350 men, commanded by Captain Reginald C. Prothero, which proceeded to the front, and three days later joined General Lord Methuen at Belmont.  On November 25th the Naval Brigade fought at the battle of graspan.  The men paraded at 5a.m. and after the kopje had been shelled the seamen and marines, led by the flag Captain, advanced on the enemy’s position.  The Boers opened a heavy fire at 600 yards and soon supplemented it with a cross fire.  Nevertheless the brigade advanced steadily by rushes, and in spite of a loss of 15 killed and 79 wounded gained the summit of the kopje, driving the Boers thence in full retreat.  So many officers had been killed and wounded, among the latter Flag Captain Prothero, that the command of the Naval Brigade developed upon Captain Alfred Edmund Marchant, R. M. L. I., who was once promoted to the rank of major.  Thus, for the first time for many years, a Naval Brigade, composed of both Bluejackets and marines, had the honour of being commanded by an officer of the Royal Marines.  A feature of the attack was the bravery of Midshipman Cymbeline Huddart of the “Doris,” who, though twice hit, courageously pressed forward until mortally wounded.  Her Majesty the late Queen Victoria was pleased to honour the Naval Brigade by telegraphing her congratulations on its gallantry, and Lord Methuen paid it a special visit and complimented it on its splendid behaviour.  On December 14th the Naval guns were in action bombarding the Boer positions at Modder River, and a Naval searchlight worked by Midshipman James Menzies of the “Doris” got into communication with the beleagured town of Kimberley.  In February two 4.7-guns proceeded to the front under Commander William Lowther Grant of the “Doris,” and subsequently took part in the battle of Paardeberg and the capture of General Cronje.  This party assisted in the capture of Bloemfontein, and suffered very severely indeed from enteric fever, no fewer than 89 officers and men being taken ill there.  They assisted in the capture of Johannesburg and of Pretoria, and in the subsequent minor operations, turning the guns over to the Royal Artillery, and arriving back on board the “Doris” on October 7th, 1900.  After the battle of Paardeberg General Piet Cronje, his wife, grandson, aide-de-camp, and adjutant were held onboard the flagship “Doris” for about six weeks, previous to their transportation to the Island of St. Helena.  They lived in the Commander-in-Chief’s suite of cabins.  The dress worn by Mrs. Cronje on arrival was badly stained with picric acid, from the bursting of lyddite shell over the trenches, in which she had lain with a noteworthy gallantry. 

HMS Eclipse

HMS Eclipse.

HMS Eclipse.

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Crew of HMS Eclipse on the China Station in 1902.

Contributed by Roger Jones.

HMS Eclipse - Name History

The seventh “ECLIPSE” is an 11-gun twin-screw cruiser, launched at Portsmouth in 1894.  She is of 5600 tons, 9600 horse-power, and 19.5 knots speed.  Her length, beam, and draught were 350ft., 53ft., and 20ft.  This vessel became a sea-going training ship for Naval cadets.

HMS Juno

Displacement: 5600 tons.    I.H.P: c.8,000    Length: 350 feet.    Beam: 53 ft 6 ins.   Depth: 20 ft 6 ins.    Speed: c.18.5 knots.     Complement: 450.

HMS Juno - Name History

The eighth “JUNO” is an 11-gun twin-screw cruiser, launched at Barrow in 1895.  She is of 5600 tons, 9600 horse-power, and 19 knots speed.  Her length, beam, and draught were 350ft., 54ft., and 21ft.  In 1901 the “Juno,” commanded by Captain H.O. Routh, was employed as escort to H.M.S. “Ophir” during the tour of Their Royal Highnesses the Duke and Duchess of Cornwall and York (now their Majesties King George V. and Queen Mary) to the colonies.  In 1912 and 1913 the “Juno” acted as a parent ship of two of the torpedo-boat destroyer flotillas at Harwich.

HMS Juno. 

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HMS Juno.

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HMS Juno.

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HMS Juno.

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Captain G H Cherry ad the officers of HMS Juno c.1900. Captain Cherry was replaced by Captain H P Routh later in this year.

Crew of HMS Juno.  Photograph taken during the First World War.

Sent in by Michael Hearn, whose grandfather served on the ship.

HMS Minerva

Displacement: 5600 tons.    I.H.P: c.8,000    Length: 350 feet.    Beam: 53 ft 6 ins.   Depth: 20 ft 6 ins.    Speed: c.18.5 knots.     Complement: 450.

HMS Minerva with HMS Rainbow and HMS Hyacinth behind her at the Royal Review in 1902.

HMS Minerva pictured c.1908. 

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HMS Minerva c.1902

Captain F O Pike and the officers of the Minerva. Some of these officers were transferred from HMS Champion.

HMS Venus

Displacement: 5600 tons.    I.H.P: c.8,000    Length: 350 feet.    Beam: 53 ft 6 ins.   Depth: 20 ft 6 ins.    Speed: c.18.5 knots.     Complement: 450.

HMS Venus pictured c.1908. 

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HMS Talbot

Displacement: 5600 tons.    I.H.P: c.8,000    Length: 350 feet.    Beam: 53 ft 6 ins.   Depth: 20 ft 6 ins.    Speed: c.18.5 knots.     Complement: 450.

The second-class cruiser Talbot was commissioned for the North America and West Indies Station on September 15th by Captain Edward H Gamble who had previously commanded Raleigh, St George and Endymion. The Talbot was a new type of ship which was only 10 ft shorter than the first-class cruisers of the Edgar class and she was also one knot faster.

HMS Talbot pictured c.1908. 

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HMS Talbot 

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HMS Talbot, 1897

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HMS Talbot c.1915

HMS Talbot.

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HMS Talbot.

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Serving Out a Day's Fresh Meat Ration 1896

The photograph shows the butcher of the Talbot cutting up a day's provision of meat, while the ship's steward weighs a piece which is being carefully observed by that "cook of the mess" who is standing by with his tin dish ready to receive it. Close at hand is the officer of the day (Lieut Paton) who is on the spot to inspect the quality of the provisions. In harbour - the Talbot was at Devonport when this photograph was taken in 1896 - one pound of fresh meat was issued to each man every day. At sea, the meat rations were: every other day, one pound of salt pork; on one alternate day, one pound of salt beef; on the other alternate day, three-quarters of a pound of preserved meat.

The Company of the Talbot 1896

The company are grouped on the forecastle and the rigging. They numbered 412 all told, and was usual for ships going abroad for a three year commission, are mostly young men and therefore better suited to learn their work quickly and well.

Captain E H Gamble and Officers of the Talbot 1896

On the Captains right is Lieutenant J B Finlaison, R.M.L.I., who was in command of the Marine detachment on board, and on the Captain's left is Commander Lewis Bayly, the executive officer of the ship.

 
 

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 With Italys entry into WW II on June 10, 1940, the epic two-and-one-half-year siege of Malta began. Symbolizing the defiant resistance of the people and defenders of that tiny island, the legend of Faith, Hope, and Charity grew from a handful of Gloster Sea Gladiators which initially comprised Maltas sole aerial defense. Until the arrival of the more modern Hawker Hurricanes, these obsolescent biplanes fought the Regia Aeronautica alone in the skies above Malta. Only six or seven Gladiators were assembled from the shipment of eighteen crated aircraft which had been delivered by the HMS Glorious. Others were utilized for spare parts, and three had been dispatched, still crated, to Egypt. Though hugely outnumbered, the defenders fought on, raising the morale of the citizens of Malta, and denying the Italians mastery of the sky. Suffering from a constant shortage of spare parts, tools and equipment, the devoted ground support crews were never able to keep more than three Gladiators operational at any point in time. Only one of these Gladiators was totally lost in aerial combat, and the sole surviving aircraft was presented to the people of Malta, and today stands in their National War Museum as a proud symbol of courage and endurance. In Stan Stokes painting, a Sea Gladiator, piloted by Flight Lt. James Pickering, tangles with a Fiat C.R. 42 over Malta in 1940 while an Italian Savoia S.79 tri-engined bomber passes by in the background. The Gloster Gladiator represented the zenith of development of the classic biplane fighter aircraft, a design formula which characterized an entire era from WW I until the advent of the monoplane fighter just before WW II. Glosters naval model of the Gladiator was equipped with a Bristol Mercury VIIIA engine providing a maximum speed of 253 MPH, a rate of climb of 2300 feet per minute, an operational ceiling of 32,200 feet, and a range of 415 miles. The Gladiator was armed with four .303 inch Browning machine guns, and incorporated several advanced features including an enclosed cockpit and wing flaps. One top RAF ace, Sqd. Ldr. Pattle, attained eleven victories flying the Gladiator. A total of 527 Gladiators were produced, and the aircraft served in twelve different countries. The Italians were overly persistent in their emphasis on biplane fighters, stemming from their successes with these highly maneuverable machines during the Spanish Civil War. Employing distinctive Warren-truss type interplane bracing the C.R. 42 was powered by a Fiat A74 R.C. 38 engine providing a maximum speed of 274 MPH and a range of 485 miles. The C.R. 42 was more lightly armed than the Gladiators it opposed, possessing only two 12.7mm Breda machine guns. The C.R 42 served on all of Italys fronts including North and East Africa, France, Britain, the Balkans, and Russia. Exported to Hungary, Sweden and Belgium, the C.R. 42 ironically served alongside the Gladiator in other theaters of operation during WW II.
Faith Hope and Charity by Stan Stokes. (C)
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 F-4C Phantom II of Colonel Robin Olds of the 8th Tactical Fighter Wing, January 1967.

Colonel Robin Olds by Ivan Berryman. (P)
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 Designed by the great Ernst Heinkel, the diminutive D.1 was an essential stop-gap that provided the Austro-Hungarian pilots with a front line fighter until they were able to re-equip with Albatros scouts in the Summer of 1917. This little aircraft performed well and was generally held in high regard by its pilots, although it did have some shortcomings, namely that forward vision was extremely limited and the Schwarzloses gun was completely concealed in the overwing pod that made it inaccessible in the air. Most unusual of all was its interplane strut arrangement, designed to reduce drag, which gave it the nicknames Starstrutter or Spider. These examples are shown passing above the German cruiser Derfflinger. 

Brandenburg D.1 by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
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 With the familiar Lincolnshire countryside beckoning, a Lancaster of the famous 617 Dambusters Squadron, makes its final approach after a raid on Germany, late summer 1944. Gerald Coulsons painting Summer Harvest winds the clock back sixty years, recreating a typical East Anglian countryside scene in late 1944. With the sun well above the horizon, a Lancaster comes thundering in on finals after a gruelling night precision bombing mission over Germany. Below, farm workers busy gathering the summer harvest, stop to marvel at the sheer power and majesty of the mighty aircraft, and to dwell briefly on what horrors its crew may have endured on their perilous journey.

Summer Harvest by Gerald Coulson.
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 With 12 victories to his credit, William Sloan was the highest scoring pilot of the 96th FS/82nd FG and is shown here in his P.38 Snooks IV ½, a reference to the fact that this aircraft was made up of so many cannibalised parts from other P.38s.

Lt William J Dixie Sloan by Ivan Berryman. (P)
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 When the RAF took delivery of their first Consolidated B.24 Liberators in 1941, aerial cover for trans-Atlantic convoys was strengthened, affording these brave merchant ships a modicum of protection as they forged their slow passage from the US to Britain with vital supplies. 120 Sqn was immediately pressed into this role from their initial base at Nutts Corner in Northern Ireland, before moving to Ballykelly and Reykjavik in Iceland as the U-Boat threat increased. The example shown is a Liberator V of RAF Coastal Command.

The Long Patrol by Ivan Berryman. (P)
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 Two British Army AH1 Apache attack helicopters escort a Boeing Chinook en route to deploy British troops in southern Afghanistan.

Outbound by Ivan Berryman. (P)
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 Guy Gibsons Lancaster having unsuccessfully dropped its bomb, draws enemy fire from the aircraft of Sqn Ldr Young as his bomb explodes spectacularly on the Mohne Dam during the audacious Dams Raids of 16th/17th May 1943.

The Night They Broke the Dams - Operation Chastise by Ivan Berryman.
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Harriers prepare to enter the landing pattern as Invincible steams in company with HMS Bristol with dusk closing in on day.

HMS Invincible by Randall Wilson. (Y)
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  Down by the bows, the battered Seydlitz returns to the Jade after being heavily involved in the gun line action at Jutland.

SMS Seydlitz 1916 by Randall Wilson (P)
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 Key ships of the British task Force sail in close formation in the Mediterranean Sea during the build-up to the coalition liberation of Iraq in march 2003. Ships pictured left to right, include ATS Argus (A135), a Type 42 destroyer in the extreme distance, the flagship HMS ark Royal (RO7), RFA Orangeleaf (A110), LSL Sir Percival (L3036), the Commando and helicopter carrier HMS ocean (L12) and the Type 42 destroyer HMS Liverpool (D92) 

NTG03 - Task Force to Iraq by Ivan Berryman (P)
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 HMS Hood readies to fire off a what proved to be the final salvo against the Bismarck before a shell from the German battleship penetrated the magazine of HMS Hood, tearing apart the British ship in an enormous explosion.

The Final Salvo - HMS Hood by Anthony Saunders. (P)
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 The Leander class cruiser HMS Orion is shown departing Grand Harbour Malta late in 1945.

HMS Orion by Ivan Berryman. (P)
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 The pride of the Royal Navy, HMS Hood, leaves Portsmouth on her way to the Fleet Review of King George V in July 1935. HMS Hood is followed by the destroyer HMS Express.

HMS Hood and HMS Express Departing from Portsmouth 1935 by Ivan Berryman. (Y)
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 Having departed the Namsen Fjord in Norway, on a course home to England across the North Sea, HMS Arab was intercepted by a Heinkel He.115 and ordered to sail due east or be attacked.  His orders ignored, the German pilot began a series of passes over the trawler, raking the small vessel with continuous fire from both of its guns.  The gallant crew of the Arab returned fire with all Lewis and Oerlikon guns blazing, the Heinkel being mortally wounded as it made a low pass across the bow of Arab, finally plunging into the sea some two miles astern of the trawler who continued, without further incident, to her destination at Scapa.

Tribute to the Royal Navy Trawler Crews - HMS Arab by Ivan Berryman. (P)
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Captain Charles Vane was born in 1680, and was an English pirate who preyed upon English and French shipping.  Vane began piracy in 1716 and lasted 3 years. Vane captured a Barbados sloop and then a large 12-gun brigantine, which he renamed the Ranger.   Vane was among the pirate captains who operated out of the Bohama at the notorious base at New Providence after the colony had been abandoned by the British.  His pirate attacks made Captain Charles Vane well known to the Royal Navy and in February of 1718 Vincent Pearse, commander of HMS Phoenix cornered Vane on his ship the Lark.  Vane  had heard of the recent royal pardons that had been offered to pirates in exchange for a guarantee they would quit plundering, so Vane claimed he had actually been en route to surrender to Pearse and accepted the pardon on the spot,  Charle Vane gained his freedom but as soon as he was free of Pearse he ignored the pardon and resumed his pirate ways.  Charles Vane was again captured and in 1721 was executed by hanging at Gallows Point, Port Royal, Jamaica on March 29th 1721.

Captain Charles Vane by Chris Collingwood. (Y)
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 The year is 1807, the French Empire is at the pinnacle of its power. Although not yet 38 years of age the Emperor Napoleon Bonaparte is marching towards the heights of his military career. It is the anniversary of his great victory against the Austrians at Marengo seven years before. Since then the soldiers of The Grand Armee have faithfully followed The Little Corporal from victory to victory across Europe. Now, in eastern Prussia, the Russians alone are holding out against the might of France. Bennigsens army is strung out on a four mile front along the banks of the river Alle, near the town of Friedland. With their backs to the unfordable river the brave Russian soldiers are drawn up in a poor position to give battle. It is already midday when Napoleon arrives on the field. Much of the French force is still some miles away but the commanders keen eye immediately perceives an opportunity for victory. He decides to attack. The vigourous assault on the Russian lines commences at about 5.30 pm. Bennigsen, anticipating an engagement on the following day, is completely surprised by this ferocious attack so late in the afternoon. The fighting begins as his divisions are preparing to withdraw across the river Alle, to a stronger position. Napoleons master stroke throws the enemy into confusion. By 8.30 pm the French are masters of the field, the Russians have lost nearly a third of their army and 80 cannons. The town of Friedland is ablaze and the Tsars army in full retreat. In simple attire and characteristically astride a nimble arab grey, Napoleon Bonaparte rides forward with his reserves of the Guard to survey the final victory. Within a few days the defeated Tsar Alexander will embrace the French Emperor on a raft anchored in the middle of the Niemen at Tilsit. At their monumental meeting they will talk of peace, co-operation against the British, the division of Prussian Territories and France with Russia will form their uneasy alliance that will quickly collapse into open hostility and present Napoleon with his greatest challenge: The invasion of Russia itself.

Napoleon at Friedland by Mark Churms. (Y)
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 Shows the French Cuirassiers of the 2nd Empire of Napoleon the 3rd.

Le Drapeau by Edouard Detaille. (Y)
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 Under pressure from Stalin to open a second front in Europe, Operation Jubilee was designed ostensibly as a reconnaissance in force on the French coast, to show the feasibility of taking and holding a major defended port for a day, in this case Dieppe. The plan devised by Lord Louis Mountbatten failed due to inadequate naval and air support, carrying out the landing in daylight and general lack of intelligence of the target. Here new Churchill tanks of the 14th Canadian Tank Regiment (The Calgary Regiment), with men of the Royal Hamilton Light Infantry and Fusiliers Mont-Royals, struggle to fight their way off the beach. Only a handful of men penetrated into the town itself, and eventually the remaining troops were ordered to withdraw. Out of 5086 soldiers who landed only 1443 returned.

Disaster at Dieppe, France, 19th August 1942 by David Pentland. (Y)
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 Fought at Bouvines a village in Flanders (now part of France) Between the French army led by King Philip Augustus of France, against the combined forces of King John of England, The Holy Roman Emperor Otti IV, and Ferdinand Count of Flanders. Due to this French victory, Frederick of Hohenstaufen became Holy Roman Emperor Frederick II in 1215. and King John of England who could not wage war against France because of dwindling support was forced to sign the Magna Charter on June 15th 1215.

The Bataille de Bouvines 27th July 1214 by Horace Vernet. (Y)
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 The 11th (North Devon) Regiment at the Battle of Salamanca, 22nd July 1812.

The Bloody Eleventh by David Rowlands. (Y)
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 Preussisch Stargard, East Prussia, February 1945.  Following the departure  of the platoon's two other vehicles, after expending all their ammunition, the single Jagdpanther of Oberfeldwebel Hermann Bix remained to cover the withdrawal of all supporting infantry in the area.  Hidden behind a muck heap, with only twenty armour piercing and five high explosive shells remaining he made the attacking Soviet Shermans pay a heavy price, destroying sixteen of their number before he too fell back out of ammunition.

The Rearguard by David Pentland. (P)
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 Sturmtigers of Sturmmorser Company 1002, commanded by Lieutenant Zippel, take on ammunition in preparation for the battle to come. These fearsome monsters 38cm rocket projectors could penetrate up to 2.5m of reinforced concrete. Luckily for the Allies only 18 were completed by the wars end.

Preparing for the Day, the Reichswald, February 1945 by David Pentland.
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 The Founders Church of St. James, Dehli, illustrates its association with this famous regiment of Bengal Lancers.

Officer Skinners Horse 1905 by Mark Churms.
Half Price! - £20.00

 

SPORT PRINTS

Click above to see all of our sport art index - Eight random half price sport items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Sport Art Offers

 Ferrari F310.  1996.
Eddie Irvine by Michael Thompson.
Half Price! - £25.00
22nd - 24th September 1995, Oakhill Country Club, Rochester, New York.  Against all odds the triumphant European team beat the USA in one of the most dramatic finishes of all time, to bring home the Ryder Cup for Europe.
Ryder Cup Victors by Peter Wileman
Half Price! - £50.00
 Jenson Button.  Reanult R202
Young Gun by Michael Thompson.
Half Price! - £30.00
 TWR Jaguar XJR 9LM - Winner of the 1988 Le Mans.  The car in this image is shown at maximum speed on the Mulsanne Straight (240mph)  Drivers: Jan Lammers, Johnny Dumfries and Andy Wallace.  This was the first win for Jaguar since 1957.  Previous victories at Le Mans were in 1951 and 1953 with C types and in 1955, 1956 and 1957 with D types.  Jaguar also won Le Mans in 1990 with the XJR 12LM.
Top Cat by Graham Bosworth.
Half Price! - £24.00

 Jacques Villeneuve.

The Maple Leaf Maestro by Stuart Coffield
Half Price! - £20.00
MT26. Juan for Williams by Michael Thompson.
Juan for Williams by Michael Thompson.
Half Price! - £30.00
SFA19.  Laytown Beach by Chris Howells.
Laytown Beach by Chris Howells.
Half Price! - £45.00
MC0041P. Blitzkrieg by Mark Churms.

Blitzkrieg by Mark Churms. (P)
Half Price! - £1250.00

Everything we obtain for this site is shown on the site, we do not have any more photos, crew lists or further information on any of the ships.

COPYRIGHT NOTICE. ALL IMAGES DISPLAYED ON THIS WEBSITE ARE PROTECTED BY  COPYRIGHT  LAW, AND ARE OWNED BY CRANSTON FINE ARTS OR THEIR RESPECTIVE OWNERS.  NO REPRODUCTION OR COPYING ALLOWED ON OTHER WEBSITES, BOOKS OR ARTICLES WITHOUT PRIOR AGREEMENT.

This website is owned by Cranston Fine Arts.  Torwood House, Torwoodhill Road, Rhu, Helensburgh, Scotland, G848LE

Contact: Tel: (+44) (0) 1436 820269.  Fax: (+44) (0) 1436 820473. Email:

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