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Acacia Class Sloops, 1915. 

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Acacia Class Sloops.  World War One launched Acacia Class Sloops.  Photos and history of the Acacia Class Sloops, launched 1915, including the ships HMS Acacia, HMS Anemone, HMS Aster, HMS Bluebell, HMS Daffodil, HMS Magnolia, HMS Dahlia, HMS Daphne, HMS Foxglove, HMS Hollyhock, HMS Lily, HMS Mallow, HMS Honeysuckle, HMS Iris, HMS Jonquil, HMS Laburnum, HMS Larkspur, HMS Lavender, HMS Lilac, HMS Marigold, HMS Mimosa, HMS Primrose, HMS Sunflower, HMS Veronica, HMS Zinnia.

HMS Acacia 15th April 1915 Sold September 1922
HMS Anemone 30th June 1915 Sold September 1922
HMS Aster 1st May 1915 Mined 4th July 1917
HMS Bluebell 24th July 1915 Sold May 1930
HMS Daffodil 17th August 1915 Sold February 1935
HMS Magnolia 26th June 1915 Sold July 1932
HMS Dahlia 21st April 1915 Sold July 1932
HMS Daphne 19th May 1915 Sold January 1923
HMS Foxglove 30th March 1915 Scrapped September 1946
HMS Hollyhock 1st May 1915 Sold October 1930
HMS Lily 6th June 1915 Sold June 1930
HMS Mallow 13th July 1915 Transferred to Australia July 1919.  Sunk as target 1st August 1935
HMS Honeysuckle 29th April 1915 Sold September 1922
HMS Iris 1st June 1915 Sold January 1920
HMS Jonquil 12th May 1915 To Portugal May 1920
HMS Laburnum 10th June 1915 Lost at Singapore February 1942
HMS Larkspur 11th May 1915 Sold March 1922
HMS Lavender 12th June 1915 Torpedoed 4th May 1917
HMS Lilac 29th April 1915 Sold December 1922
HMS Marigold 27th May 1915 Sold January 1920
HMS Mimosa 16th July 1915 Sold November 1922
HMS Primrose 29th June 1915 Sold April 1923
HMS Sunflower 28th May 1915 Sold 27th January 1921
HMS Veronica 27th May 1915 Sold 22nd March 1935
HMS Zinnia 12th August 1915 Transferred to Belgium 19th April 1920, retaining name.
HMS Bluebell

HMS Bluebell with Chinese prisoners , Off China Coast 1920's 

A reproduction of this original photo / photo-postcard size 10" x 7" approx available.  Order photograph here  © Walker Archive. Order Code PHX134

HMS Daffodil

HMS Daffodil, 1934.

A large image size 10" x 7" approx, is available.  Reproduced from the original negative / photo under license from MPL, the copyright holder.  A signed numbered certificate is supplied. Price £25.   Order photograph here   Order Code  XMP2524

Original republished © MPL Photograph (Postcard Size).  Price £5 Click here to order.  Order Code  MP2524

HMS Dahlia

HMS Dahlia at Leith, 1919.  Contributed by John Dixon.

The voyage when this photo was taken, was Leith to Riga, leaving Riga 31st December 1919, with many "Russian" refugees, for Sheerness via Copenhagen.  Decommissioned at Sheerness January 1920.

HMS Dahlia at Sea, 1919.  Contributed by John Dixon.

John Dixon's grandfather Lt J E Loveluck was master of HMS Dahlia from ~September 1919 to January 1920.

HMS Foxglove

HMS Foxglove, 1924.

A large image size 10" x 7" approx, is available.  Reproduced from the original negative / photo under license from MPL, the copyright holder.  A signed numbered certificate is supplied. Price £25.   Order photograph here   Order Code  XMP2525

Original republished © MPL Photograph (Postcard Size).  Price £5 Click here to order.  Order Code  MP2525

HMS Hollyhock

HMS Hollyhock. Contributed by  John Moore

HMS Mallow

HMS Mallow, 1930.

A large image size 10" x 7" approx, is available.  Reproduced from the original negative / photo under license from MPL, the copyright holder.  A signed numbered certificate is supplied. Price £25.   Order photograph here   Order Code  XMP2526

Original republished © MPL Photograph (Postcard Size).  Price £5 Click here to order.  Order Code  MP2526

HMS Primrose

HMS Primrose, 1917.

A large image size 10" x 7" approx, is available.  Reproduced from the original negative / photo under license from MPL, the copyright holder.  A signed numbered certificate is supplied. Price £25.   Order photograph here   Order Code  XMP2527

Original republished © MPL Photograph (Postcard Size).  Price £5 Click here to order.  Order Code  MP2527

 

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AVIATION PRINTS

Click above to see all of our aviation art index - Eight random half price aviation items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Aviation Art Offers

 On Stalins personal orders, Petlyako PE-8 bombers, led by the hero of the Soviet Union, Major General Mikhal V. Vodopyanov, carry out their only raid on the German capital of Berlin.

Red Stars Over Berlin, 12th August 1941 by David Pentland.
Half Price! - £35.00
DHM683.  Alouette III Helicopter of Rhodesian Fireforce 1979 by John Wynne Hopkins.

Alouette III Helicopter of Rhodesian Fireforce 1979 by John Wynne Hopkins.
Half Price! - £50.00
 One of the final versions of the ubiquitous De Havilland Vampire to be built was the T.11, a two-seat trainer, one example of which was XE998, shown here in the colours of No.8 Flying School at RAF Swinderby in the early 1960s.  This aircraft is now preserved and on display in the Solent Sky Museum, although currently in the livery of the Swiss Air Force.

De Havilland Vampire T.11 by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - £700.00
 Tribute to the ground crew of Bomber Command. Ground crew inspect and prepare the engines of a Stirling bomber as it is refuelled in preparation for that nights mission.

Stirling Work by Ivan Berryman. (Y)
Half Price! - £50.00

 Under the watchful eye of his more experienced tutor a trainee pilot gets his first taste of the Spitfire Mk.IIa, airborne from Tangmere early in 1941. the nearest aircraft is P7856 (YT-C) which enjoyed a long career, surviving until 1945.

The Fledgling by Ivan Berryman. (E)
Half Price! - £95.00
 Portsmouth August 26th 1940, the lone spitfire of Squadron Leader Sandy Johnstone breaks the ranks and picks off one of the menacing Heinkels only to encounter an equally determined attack from a BF109. <br><br>We were brought to readiness in the middle of lunch and scrambled to intercept mixed bag of 100+ Heinkel IIIs and DO 17s approaching Portsmouth from the South.  The controller did a first class job and positioned us one thousand feet above the target. with the sun  behind us, allowing us to spot the raiders from a long way off. No escorting Messchersmitts were in sight at the time, although a sizable force was to turn up soon after. then something strange happened.  I was about to give a ticking off to our chaps for misusing the R/T when I realised I was listening to German voices. It appeared we were both using the same frequency and, although having no knowledge of the language it sounded from the monotonous flow of the conversation that they were unaware of our presence. as soon  as we dived towards the leading formation, however we were assailed immediately to loud shouts of  Achtung Spitfuern Spitfuern! as our bullets began to take their toll.  In spite of having taken jerry by surprise our bag was only six, with others claimed as damaged, before the remainder dived for cloud cover and turned for home. In the meantime the escorting fighters were amongst us when two of our fellows were badly shot up. Hector Maclean stopped a cannon shell on his cockpit, blowing his foot off above the ankle although, in spite of his grave injuries, he managed to fly his spitfire back to Tangmere to land with wheels retracted. Cyril Babbages aircraft was also badly damaged in the action. forcing him to abandon it and take to his parachute. He was ultimately picked up by a rescue launch and put ashore at Bognor, having suffered only minor injuries.  I personally accounted for one Heinkel III in the action (Sandy Johnson) . <br><br>No. 602 City of Glasgow auxiliary squadron was a household name long before WWII began. It had been the first auxiliary squadron to get into the air in 1925, two of its members, Lord Clydeside and David McIntyre  were the first to conquer Mount Everest in 1933, the squadron sweeped the board in gunnery and bombing in 1935, beating the regular squadrons at their own game. It was the first auxiliary Squadron to be equipped with Spitfire Fighters as far back as March 1939 and it was the first squadron to shoot down the first enemy aircraft on British soil.  The squadron moved south from Drem airfield in East Lothian on August 14th 1940 to relieve the already battered no. 145 squadron at Westhampnett, Tangmeres satelitte station in Sussex. The squadron suffered 5 casualties during the battle. The squadron remained at Westhampnett until December 1940 to be replaced by no. 610 auxiliary airforce squadron. No 602 squadron itself remained active up until 1957 when it was put into mothballs.

Gauntlet by Anthony Saunders (P)
Half Price! - £2750.00
 If you had the height, you controlled the battle. If you came out of the sun, the enemy could not see you. If you held your fire until you were very close, you seldom missed. These three basic rules contributed to the prowess in aerial combat of some of the most successful fighter pilots in history and seldom were they more valuable than when outnumbered. Between July and October 1940 the brave young pilots of RAF Fighter Command were under intense pressure from the constant attacks of the Luftwaffe and the Hawker Hurricane was <i>the</i> machine of the Battle of Britain, accounting for 80 percent of Allied victories.  In this painting, Hurricanes of 32 Sqn climb high into the morning sky, gaining Height and Sun in an attempt to take the advantage over the onslaught of enemy fighters - August, 1940.  This image captures the surreal calmness above the clouds, belying the fury of action and ultimate sacrifices made in those crisp blue skies.

Height and Sun by Robert Taylor.
Half Price! - £150.00
 With his personal emblem of black and white fuselage band adorning his Fokker E.V, 153/18, Richard Wenzl briefly commanded Jasta 6, based at Bernes in August 1918, and claimed a modest 6 victories during his career with JG 1. The Fokker E.V was both fast and manoeuvrable, but a series of engine and structural failures meant that these exciting new machines saw only brief service before being re-worked to emerge as the D.VIII, sadly too late to make any impression on the war. Wenzl is shown here in combat with Sopwith Camels of 203 Sqn, assisted by Fokker D.VIIs, which served alongside the E.Vs of Jasta 6. The D.VII shown is that of Ltn d R Erich Just of Jasta 11, also based at Bernes.

Leutnant d R Richard Wenzl by Ivan Berryman. (AP)
Half Price! - £60.00

 

NAVAL PRINTS

Click above to see all of our naval art index - Eight random half price naval items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Naval Art Offers

 HMS Norfolk and HMS Belfast of Force I are shown engaging the Scharnhorst which has already been hit and disabled by both HMS Duke of York and the cruiser HMS Jamaica.  Scharnhorst was never to escape the clutches of the British and Norwegian forces for, having been slowed to just a few knots by numerous hits, fell victim to repeated torpedo attacks by the allied cruisers and destroyers that had trapped the German marauder.

HMS Norfolk at the Battle of the North Cape by Ivan Berryman (AP)
Half Price! - £25.00
Germanys U-boat fleet had almost brought Britain to its knees in the First World war, twenty years later the story was very similar. the German U-boat arm came perilously close to cutting the lifeline that crossed the Atlantic between North America and Britain. in the early years of the war Donitz realised that keeping his U-boats at sea for as long as possible would greatly increase their chances of success. here U-93 (left) and U-94 take fuel from the auxiliary cruiser Kormoran whilst in the mid-Atlantic during 1941

Dawn Rendezvous by Anthony Saunders (P)
Half Price! - £2900.00
 The submarine depot ship HMS Maidstone is pictured off Hong Kong with a quintet of British submarines alongside for replenishment, namely (left to right) an S-class, a U-class, a T-class and two more U-class.

HMS Maidstone by Ivan Berryman (P)
Half Price! - £450.00
  Down by the bows, the battered Seydlitz returns to the Jade after being heavily involved in the gun line action at Jutland.

SMS Seydlitz 1916 by Randall Wilson (P)
Half Price! - £1800.00

DHM810.  The Queen Elizabeth 2 Leaving New York by Robert Barbour.

The Queen Elizabeth 2 Leaving New York by Robert Barbour.
Half Price! - £35.00
 Spearheading the Falklands Task Force as it heads south in 1982, the carrier HMS Hermes is shown in company with two Type 21 frigates, HMS Arrow on the left and HMS Ardent in the near foreground.  In the far distance, HMS Glamorgan glints in the sun as Type 42 HMS Sheffield cuts across behind Hermes.

HMS Hermes by Ivan Berryman (AP)
Half Price! - £25.00
On Sunday October 25th 1992, HMS Vanguard, the Royal Navys first Trident equipped submarine, arrived off the Clyde Submarine Base, Faslane on the Gareloch. She was escorted by a Sea King helicopter from HMS Gannet, the RN shore base at Prestwick Airport, and a mixed surface flotilla, including Defence Police and Royal Marines.

Trident by Robert Barbour.
Half Price! - £45.00
On 29th and 30th April 1944, while surfaced close to jagged reefs, and Japanese shore guns, the USS Tang rescued 22 downed flyers from Task Force 58s strikes against enemy positions on the islands - This was the largest rescue of airmen by a submarine in the war.  USS Tang (SS-306) would later be sunk by its own torpedo off Formosa, on the 24th of October 1944.

USS Tang, The Life Guard of Truk Atoll by Robert Barbour (AP)
Half Price! - £70.00

 

MILITARY PRINTS

Click above to see all of our military art index - Eight random half price military items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Military Art Offers

 Sturmtigers of Sturmmorser Company 1002, commanded by Lieutenant Zippel, take on ammunition in preparation for the battle to come. These fearsome monsters 38cm rocket projectors could penetrate up to 2.5m of reinforced concrete. Luckily for the Allies only 18 were completed by the wars end.

Preparing for the Day, the Reichswald, February 1945 by David Pentland.
Half Price! - £90.00
 Battle of Agincourt, October 25th 1415. Fought during the Hundred years war at the end of the English Invasion of 1415. King Henry the V of England, after his conquest of Harfleur marched his army of 1,000 Knights and 5,000 Archers (many of which were Welsh) towards Calais. He marched to Amiens as flooding had affected the river at the Somme which was the direct route. This delay helped the French army of 20,000 strong under the command of the Constable Charles dAlbret and Marshal Jean Bouciquaut II. The French army blocked Henry V route to Calais, giving the English no choice but to fight. Henry V positioned his army at Agincourt, between to wooded areas giving a frontage of 1100 metres. Henry deployed his force into three divisions; each group had archers at each flank. He had chosen his position well, in front of his army was ploughed fields and due to the heavy raid was very muddy. Due to the narrow battlefield area the French army lost their advantage of superior numbers. At 11 oclock the English started to advance their archers within 2509 yards of the French, getting them into range of the French lines. The French line of Cavalry advanced at a slow pass due to the heavy mud, They took heavy losses from the arrows from the English Long Bowman. They were eventually repulsed by the Archers who as the French cavalry approached changed from using longbows for axes and swords. The French second Cavalry line advanced only to be finally repulsed after hand to hand fighting. The commander Duc dAlencon was killed in the attack. The second charge had failed and many of the French knights were taken prisoner. Believing he had been attacked in the rear Henry V ordered that the prisoners were to be put to death. In fact There was no real rear attack it was French Camp followers plundering the English Camp. The French camp followers were quickly dealt with and the English again prepared itself for the next attack. The third attack never materialized as the sight of so much blood shed and piles of corpses turned the charge into a retreat. The English had won the day with losses less than 1600 compared to the French losses of over 7,000, including the capture of Bouciquaut. Henry V, his way now cleared reached Calais on the 16th November 1415. Agincourt is one of the great battles of military history, and this victory enabled Henry V to return to France in 1417 and conquer all of Normandy.

Morning of Agincourt by Sir John Gilbert. (Y)
Half Price! - £30.00
DHM556P.  1st Texas Infantry by Jim Lancia.
1st Texas Infantry by Jim Lancia (P)
Half Price! - £950.00
 A German machine gun team defend against the British 3rd Corps attack on the high ground north of the Somme.  This was to be the start of the final Allied offensive of the war.

The Machine Guns - Battle of Amiens, France, 8th August 1918 by David Pentland. (P)
Half Price! - £1100.00

 German forces encircled in the fortress town of Konigsberg by 3rd Ukranian front prepare to break through the besieging Soviet lines to re-establish a supply line to the Baltic. Here some Stug III assault guns move up to their assembly area next to the towns World War One memorial. From here the attack was launched on February 18th 1945 and successfully opened a supply corridor which remained in place until 8th April.

Counter Attack at Konigsberg by David Pentland. (B)
Half Price! - £60.00
Lt. John Rouse Merriot Chard, Royal Engineers.At about 3.30 on the afternoon of 22nd January 1879, Lieutenant John Rouse Merriot Chard, Royal Engineers, was supervising repairs on the military pont on the Mzinyathi river, at the border crossing at Rorkes Drift, when survivors brought news  that the advanced British camp at Isandhlwana had been over-run by the Zulus, and that a wing of the Zulu army was on its way to attack Rorkes Drift. Chard ordered Driver Robson to pack up the wagon and return to the mission station, where a stockpile of supplies was under the guard of B Company, 2/24th Regiment. Chard, in consultation with his fellow officers, made the historic decision to make a stand at Rorkes Drift.
Eve of Distinction by Mark Churms. (P)
Half Price! - £3900.00
Alfred was born in 849 at Wantage, Oxfordshire  He was the youngest son of King Ethelwulf of Wessex, he became King of the Anglo Saxon Kingdom of Wessex from 871 to 899.  Alfred is known for his great defence of the Kingdoms of southern England against the Vikings. Eventually in 871 he made peace with the Vikings who agreed to a withdrawal out of his kingdom. It is likely a large payment of gold was made.  Alfred was awarded the epithet The Great, and was the only king to be awarded this title.  Alfred the Great was a learned man and improved the education and legal and military systems and structure.  Alfred died on the 26th October 899

Alfred The Great by Chris Collingwood (P)
Half Price! - £6000.00
Battle of Prestonpans.  Bonnie Prince Charlie, after landing at Glenfinnan, in his bid to gain the British Throne.  Lord George Murray with an army of 2,000 Jacobites marched southward where they were meet  at Prestonpans by General  Sir John Cope and a Royal army of 3,000 men  On the 21st September.  The Jacobites charged the  government troops and routed them. hundreds of Government troops were killed or wounded and over 1,000 were captured. with the Jacobite losses less than 150.  With this victory Charles Edward Stuart and the Jacobite army marched southwards into England capturing the towns of Carlisle, Penrith, Lancaster and Preston and getting as far as Nottingham before lack of supplies and new recruits forced him to heads back to Scotland. Through the early morning Autumn mist, Highlanders of the Appin Regiment abandon their plaids and rush headlong across fields of stubble into the stunned ranks of Jonny Copes army. The force sent by the Crown to destroy the rebellion and capture the Pretender is itself utterly routed in a matter of minutes.  The first major engagement of the uprising is a swift and complete victory for the Princes men. Except for the garrisons of Edinburgh, Stirling, Fort William and Fort Augustus, Scotland is now under the control of the Jacobites.

The Charge of the Highlanders at the Battle of Preston Pans, by Mark Churms. (AP)
Half Price! - £90.00

 

SPORT PRINTS

Click above to see all of our sport art index - Eight random half price sport items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Sport Art Offers

 England 53 - South Africa 3, Twickenham, Novermber 23rd 2002. England: Robinson, Cohen, Tindall, Greenwood, Christophers, Wilkinson, Dawson, Vickery, Leonard, Thompson, Johnson, Kay, Moody, Back, Hill. (Subs): Dallaglio, Gomersall, Healey, Morris, Regan, Stimpson. Scores: Try - Cohen, 2 Tries - Greenwood, Try - Back, Try - Hill, Try - Dallaglio, Penalty Try, 2 Penalties - Wilkinson, Conversion - Wilkinson, Conversion - Dawson, 2 Conversions - Gomersall, 2 Conversions - Stimpson. <br><br>South Africa: Greef, Paulse, Fleck, James, Lombard, Pretorius, Conradie, Roux, Dalton, Venter, Lambuschagne, Krige, Wannenburg, Van Niekerk. (Subs): Jacobs, Jordaan, Russell, Uys, Van Biljon, Van der Linde, Wentzel. Score : Penalty - Pretorius.

England v South Africa - Investec 2002 by Doug Harker. (Y)
Half Price! - £100.00


Michael Atherton by Keith Fearon.
Half Price! - £70.00
SFA7.  Galileo by Stephen Smith.

Galileo by Stephen Smith.
Half Price! - £70.00


Lennox Lewis by Peter Deighan.
Half Price! - £50.00

B45. David Coulthard/ Williams FW.17 by Ivan Berryman

David Coulthard/ Williams FW.17 by Ivan Berryman
Half Price! - £40.00
 England 1 Germany 0, Euro 2000.  On the 17th of June 2000 England once again faced their old nemesis Germany in a Group A qualifying match at Euro 2000.  England entered the game knowing that they had not defeated Germany in a competitive match since the famous World Cup victory in 1966.  Germany made four changes to the side that had drawn with Romania including the introduction of midfielder Sebastian Deisler, whilst England had been forced to replace Tony Adams and Steve McManaman with Martin Keown and Dennis Wise due to injury.  As expected the game started at a frenetic pace and Jancker made things difficult for England's central defenders early on with his height and strength.  England appeared to be lacking cohesion and allowed Germany to take control of the game.  Deisler brought the German crowd to their feet with a clever run down the right hand side and minutes later Hamaan had their first strike on goal which was hit directly at David Seaman.  England were looking for a flash of inspiration and it was very nearly delivered as Michael Owen managed to meet Phil Neville's cross with his head but only managed to direct the ball on to the post.  Paul Scholes in typical fashion drove a ferocious volley, which was tipped just over the bar, and suddenly it appeared that England were beginning to find some weaknesses in certain areas of the German side.  At the interval little separated the two sides however, England started the second half with a steely determination.  After just seven minutes David Beckham earned his side a free kick in a very dangerous position on the England right.  With good movement from the forwards in the German area Beckham swung a speculative cross into the six yard box.  Owen, beaten by the pace, failed to connect but man of the match Alan Shearer anticipated the kind bounce and without hesitation headed the ball back across Kahn and into the right hand side of the German goal.  The England captain had broken the deadlock and instilled in his side the belief that they could finally defeat their oldest rivals.  Germany threw everything they had at England but Keegan's team were equal to the task in every area of the pitch.  As the final whistle blew a huge roar erupted from the England supporters as Alan Shearer's goal had ended over thirty years of frustration and sealed his place in the history books as one of England's greatest ever strikers.

Perfect Finish by Peter Cornwell.
Half Price! - £50.00
DHM1480. Jenson Button 2004 BAR 006 by Ivan Berryman.
Jenson Button 2004 BAR 006 by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £50.00
FAR695.  Tribute to Lester Piggott by Stuart McIntyre.

Tribute to Lester Piggott by Stuart McIntyre.
Half Price! - £20.00

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