Home ] Up ] Acknowledgements ] How to use our site ]

HMS Royal Sovereign 

Home ] Up ] HMS Empress of India ] HMS Ramillies ] HMS Repulse of 1892 ] HMS Resolution ] HMS Revenge 1892 ] HMS Royal Oak ] [ HMS Royal Sovereign ]

Choose the navy or section of interest below:

Royal Navy United States Germany France Japan Italy Russia Austria-Hungary
Canada Spain Netherlands Argentina Brazil Portugal Turkey Australia
Norway Sweden Denmark Belgium Chile Uruguay China New Zealand
Malta Greece India Poland South Africa Pakistan Libya Kuwait
Ireland Other Navies Liners   Unidentified Ships Wartime Naval Losses


Customer Helpline (UK) : 01436 820269
Subscribe to our Newsletter!

You currently have no items in your basket

Choose a FREE print if you spend over £220!
See Choice of Free Prints

Payment Options Display
Buy with confidence and security!
Publishing historical art since 1985

Google

 

Web

www.battleships-cruisers.co.uk

 

 HMS Royal Sovereign of the Royal Sovereign Class of battleship. Sister ships HMS Empress of India, HMS Ramillies, HMS Repulse, HMS Resolution, HMS Revenge and HMS Royal Oak. HMS Royal Sovereign, launched 26th February 1891, she served in both the Home and Channel Fleets but after 1900 she served in home waters and finally scrapped 7th October 1913.

The Royal Sovereign as a steel armoured battleship of the Naval Defence Act  Programme completed for sea in 1892. She was built at Portsmouth Dockyard and engined by Messrs. Humphrys & Tennant. Royal Sovereign was at one time flagship of the Channel Squadron. She was last commissioned in December 1895 by Captain Reginald F H Henderson C.B.

Displacement: 14,150 tons.    Length: 380 ft.    Beam: 75ft.   Horse power: 13,312.   Draught: 27' 6".    Speed: 18 knots.    Armament: four 67 ton guns in armoured barbettes.     Armour: 18 inch thick

HMS Royal Sovereign, with HMS Royal Oak, laid up c.1910.

Click here for photo purchasing options

 

HMS Royal Sovereign, 1892.

Click here for photo purchasing options

HMS Royal Sovereign, January, 1894

HMS Royal Sovereign.

Click here for photo purchasing options

Stropping a Block on board HMS Royal Sovereign

Click here for photo purchasing options

Some crew of HMS Royal Sovereign, January, 1894

HMS Royal Sovereign.

Click here for photo purchasing options

HMS Royal Sovereign, 1892

Click here for photo purchasing options

A group of executive officers on HMS Royal Sovereign, 1895.

Click here for photo purchasing options

The Vulcan, Royal Sovereign and Thetis at Plataea Harbour c.1900.

For a considerable portion of the year the Mediterranean Fleet cruised eastward. This work was not well liked as it did not present the social amenities found at Malta or some of the other Italian and Spanish ports, and after all life on board was sufficiently monotonous in 1900 for a little excitement to be needed. Greece was friendly to Great Britain and allowed the navy to make limited use of her ports and islands. Here torpedoes were run and gun practise was carried out. The British ships shown at anchor above are in the small port of Plataea.

Looking Forward on board the Royal Sovereign.

Photograph taken on board HMS Royal Sovereign from the fore bridge while at Spithead in November 1885 just before the ship put to sea for her last cruise as flagship to the Channel Squadron. Shows the two 67 ton guns of the ship mounted in the forward barbette. Two similar guns are mounted in a similar barbette aft, the two pairs forming together the principal armament of the ship. The barbettes themselves are protected with 17 inch steel-faced armour, and the guns will throw huge projectiles 13.5 inches in diameter through 18 inches of iron, yet they are loaded, trained and fired with the greatest of ease.

Click here for photo purchasing options

HMS Royal Sovereign Hoisting the Steam Pinnace.

Photograph taken on board Royal Sovereign looking aft while at Spithead just before she left for the winter cruise of the Channel Squadron off the South West coast of Ireland. She is at anchor with another battleship of the Channel Squadron her sister ship the Resolution close astern. The picket-boat has already been hoisted in and secured, and the pinnace is in the act of being swung inboard to be secured, under the direction of the Commander, who is on the after bridge carrying on the duty.

Click here for photo purchasing options

On the Forecastle of HMS Royal Sovereign.

A ship's company is divided, broadly speaking, into two watches (each of which is of course further dived for duty), and the men go on leave when in port in turn, watch by watch. The watch on board Royal Sovereign when at Portsmouth in November 1894 is shown in the photograph- upwards of 300 and odd men of all ratings, bluejackets, stokers and marines. The whole forecastle including the lofty barbette and the two giant 67 ton guns is shown covered and entirely hidden by the men, the camera being placed for the occasion by the cable bollards which appear in the foreground of the photograph.

Click here for photo purchasing options

Pay Day on board the Royal Sovereign (1885)

The pay chest on the table comprises several rows of drawers divided into compartment to hold separately the money due to each man.  The money is placed in the compartments in the Paymasters office below, and the chest then brought on deck where it is paid out in the presence of an executive officer.  The Paymaster is shown paying a bluejacket with the Commander of the ship on his right, while the Master-at-Arms stands by to check the names of the men.  Jack sweeps his money into his cap in the way a sailor has taken his pay ever since the time of Samuel Pepys.  The British bluejacket of today is a thrifty soul, and seldom fails to remit a portion of his pay to the old folk at home or to have a little nest egg in the savings bank.

Click here for photo purchasing options

Officers of the Royal Sovereign

These are the officers who served with Lord Walter Kerr in the Royal Sovereign during her final cruise in November and December as senior flagship of the Channel Squadron, who with the Admiral turned over to the newer Majestic, the Royal Sovereign's successor as flagship. All ranks and branches of officers - executive, engineer, accountant and marine are represented. Captain Arthur Barrow being shown in the centre, distinguishable by the four rings of distinction lace on his cuffs and aiguilettes which he wears as flag captain. The other officer wearing aiguilettes is Lord Walter Kerrs secretary Mr Hume.

Click here for photo purchasing options

HMS Royal Sovereign of the Channel Squadron - 1896

The Royal Sovereign is a steel armoured battleship of the Naval Defence Act Programme and was completed for sea in 1892. She was built at Portsmouth Dockyard, and engined by Messrs. Humphrys & Tennant.  Her displacement is 14,150 tons; I.H.P. 13,312.  Length 380ft. Beam, 75ft. Maximum draught 27ft 6ins.  She carries as her pricipal armament four 67-ton guns in two armoured barbettes, and has a partial belt of armour of 18ins. maximum thickness.  Her speed is 18 knots.  The Royal Sovereign was at one time flagship of the Channel Squadron.  She was last commissioned in December 1895 by Captain Reginald F H Henderson, C. B.

Click here for photo purchasing options

Issuing Grog on Board the Royal Sovereign (1895)

The sailors rum is drawn from the spirit store in presence of an officer at seven bells (11.30 am), put into a breaker and taken on deck, where it remains under a sentry until, at half past twelve, it is mixed in a grog tub, with two or three parts of water and then served out.  Half a gill of rum is allowed to each man.  Teetotalers are allowed compensation - the money value of the rum, or its equivalent in cocoa and sugar.

Click here for photo purchasing options

The Royal Sovereign photographed at the Royal Review of 1902. She was the flagship of Admiral Sir Charles Hotham who was Admiral Commander-in-Chief at Spithead during this time.

After the royal yacht had passed through the lines of ships she weighed anchor opposite the Royal Sovereign. Picture shows crew giving three cheers for the King.

Crew of the Royal Sovereign showing their winners cup - the Heavy Gun Trophy.

Left to right - Back: W Triance, H Wilson, M McDonald, W Huston, E Smith, C Gooch, W Henley.

Middle: F Garrett, D McDonald, H Payne, Mr Raven, Mr McClintock, C Zimmer, J Fisher, S Carter. 

Front: H Grant, M Tallack, H Pilgrim, Mr Northcott.

Navy Pistol experts from the Royal Sovereign, winners of the Barfleur Challenge Cup in 1902.

The Gun Catastrophe In The “Royal Sovereign.”

           Since the historic explosion on board the “Thunderer,” when a 38-ton turret-gun burst, killing twelve and wounding thirty-eight men, there has been no disaster of a similar character in the Royal Navy to equal the terrible accident that has cast a deep gloom over the squadron on the Mediterranean station.  In action men know that when they stand to their guns their lives are in the hands of their Creator, but the shock is terrible when the decks are strewn with dead and dying by an accident occurring in time of peace.  In loss of life the disaster has a terrible roll of one officer and five men, whilst two other officers, a warrant officer, and sixteen seamen and marines were more or less seriously injured.  The accident took place during firing exercise in the neighbourhood of Platea, where the ships of the Mediterranean Squadron go for torpedo practice.  The vessel was on her way to Malta, where she has since arrived, and the injured have been sent to hospital.  The catastrophe in some of its features will remind our readers of the one at Newport in the Isle of Wight last June, when a company of Royal Garrison Artillery were engaged at target practice.  The charge that caused this disaster was that of a 12-pounder quick-fire, a much less powerful weapon than a 6-inch gun of the “Royal Sovereign,” and with correspondingly smaller damage, but the accident- the worst that can happen, except perhaps the actual bursting of the gun-resulted in the death of an officer and three men, and more or less serious injury to five others.  There is, moreover, about these sad events a similar cause of mournful pride, in that nothing could of exceeded the exemplary bearing of both officers and men at one time of, and after, the accident.

           Captain Spurway, who was killed, joined the “Blue Marines” in July 1893, and was promoted Captain just five years later, and joined the “Royal Sovereign” a few months after.  His death will throw many in the West Country into mourning, for he comes of a Devonshire family that has been established at Bampton for many centuries.  He was only twenty-seven, and his death is the sadder in that he leaves a widow, to whom he was only married last year at Valetta.  The double page illustration of the combined Channel and Mediterranean Squadrons possesses a pathetic interest, for it is reproduced from the last photograph that this journal received from the deceased officer, who not unfrequently contributed pictorially to its pages.  The photograph was taken during the recent combined manoeuvres of the Channel and Mediterranean Squadrons, and on the day of the sailing regatta for the boats of the fleet.  The ships on the page to the right hand are those of the Channel Squadron, with the exception of the one on the left, which is the “Ramillies,” Lord Charles Beresford’s flag ship (second in command if the Mediterranean); and on the left page are the two lines of the Mediterranean Squadron.  The centre ship in this picture is Sir John Fisher’s flag-ship (Commander-in-chief of the Mediterranean).  In the right page picture the flagships, other than the “Ramillies,” are the “Majestic” and “Magnificent,” the flagships respectively of Vice-Admiral Wilson and Rear-Admiral Sir W.A.D. Aclaud (Commander-in-chief and second in command of the Channel).

Upper Deck Battery on HMS Royal Sovereign (1901).

Click here for photo purchasing options

HMS Royal Sovereign (1901).

Click here for photo purchasing options

Captain H W Spurway R.M.A.

Killed by the gun accident with 5 other men.

           The officer who was most seriously injured in the accident was the commander of the “Royal Sovereign,” Sir R. K. Arbuthnot , a scotch baronet.  He entered the service in 1877, was promoted Lieutenant from the Royal yacht in 1885, and became commander in 1897.  He is a gunnery officer of high attainments, and was promoted to his present rank from the position of first lieutenant of the “Cambridge,” the gunnery school at Devonport.  The other officer, who was injured less severely, was Lieutenant James, whose family belongs to Cumberland.  He entered the service in 1893, was promoted lieutenant last June, and only joined the “Royal Sovereign” last September.

           Mr. Raven, who luckily escaped with light injuries, was the gunner of the “Royal Sovereign.”  He obtained his warrant rank in 1895, and had been serving over two years in the “Royal Sovereign,” which ship is now in commission for the second time in the Mediterranean.  Her present commission dates from May 13, 1899, and her complement have won the fine array of cups her illustrated.  The lower one in the centre is the “Barfleur” Revolver Cup, won by the officers of the “Royal Sovereign,” both in 1900 and 1901.  The one above it is a Blue jacket’s Cup, won at this year’s regatta.  The two on the right are also this years trophies, the upper one having been won at volley-firing by the ships marines team at the Pembroke rifle meeting, the lower, the Commander-in-Chief’s Cup, was won at the Royal Naval Sports.  The upper cup on the left is the “Undaunted” Cup, a gunnery trophy won this year, and that below it is the Middle Weight Boxing Championship Cup, won in 1900.  Prior going to the Mediterranean the “Royal Sovereign” was flag-ship of the channel squadron, and she is a ship of special interest, for her building was a record for rapidity, and she was the first to be completed of the ten battle-ships that formed the main feature of the Naval Defence Act of 1889.  The main armament of this fine vessel consists of two pairs of 13’5 inch guns, mounted fore and aft on barbettes, and between the barbettes a secondary battery of ten 6-inch quick firers.  She and her sisters were the earliest ships to carry quick firers of this calibre, and it was to one of these guns that the disaster happened.  These guns are used with a charge of 13-lb. 4-oz. Of cordite, enclosed in a brass cartridge-case, which obviates the use of an obturator, or gas check, on the breech-piece a fact which would tend to make the accident all he more serious, as, in addition to the charge, and probably the mechanism, being blown to the rear, there would also be the heavy metallic cartridge-case, which would become a death-dealing projectile.  Some ten years ago a somewhat similar accident occurred to a gun of the same calibre, but of the old non quick-firing pattern, on board the cruiser “Cordelia,” then on duty on the Australian station.

           In this case the gun itself burst, and that, unfortunately, in the most deadly manner, for the burst took place at the breech, with the result that the breech-block and huge fragments of the gun and carriage were hurled across the deck, instead of the major force of the explosion operating outboard, as would have been the case had the gun yielded near the muzzle.

           In this case, also, the terrible nature of the disaster paralleled that on board the “Royal Sovereign,” for six poor fellows were killed on the spot, and thirteen others more or less seriously injured.  Accidents of this character have, however, been of the rarest in the British Navy, and our blue jackets have never had any reason to mistrust the weapons they will have to stand behind and trust in when they are called upon to meet the foe.       

Extract from "The Navy & Army Illustrated"

 

HMS Royal Sovereign by W Fred Mitchell. (P)


HMS Royal Sovereign by W Fred Mitchell. (P)

Item Code : ANTN0033HMS Royal Sovereign by W Fred Mitchell. (P) - Editions Available
TYPEDESCRIPTIONSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSPRICEPURCHASING
ANTIQUE
CHROMOLITHOGRAPH
Original chromolithograph published c.1890.
Full Item Details
Size 9 inches x 6.5 inches (24cm x 19cm)none£110.00

Quantity:


 

Valuations

Classified Ads Terms and Conditions Shipping Info Contact Details

 

 

Click here to go to our naval history forum

 

AVIATION PRINTS

Click above to see all of our aviation art index - Eight random half price aviation items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Aviation Art Offers

 On the evening of 25th May 1940, Luftwaffe Ace Hans-Ekkehard Bob claimed his third victory, bringing down a French Morane 406 near Cambrai during the Battle of France.

Terminal Morane by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £40.00
 The heavy cruiser Prinz Eugen slips quietly through the waters of Kiel Harbour as one of her own Arado Ar.196s flies overhead. In the background, Bismarck, wearing her Baltic camouflage, is alongside taking on supplies.

Prinz Eugen by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £15.00
 Undoubtedly one of the truly great Aces of the First World War, William Billy Bishop became celebrated for his technique of actively seeking out the enemy and bringing the fight to him, rather than the more usual practice of patrolling in search of enemy activity. An example of this was his single-handed attack on a German airfield in June 1917 when he destroyed not only a number of aircraft on the ground, but then successfully despatched another seven Albatross scouts that took off to engage him. For this action, he was awarded the Victoria Cross in August 1917 and his final tally when the war ended was 72 confirmed victories. He is depicted here in his Nieuport Scout B1566 in combat with a Pfalz D.III.

Captain William Billy Bishop by Ivan Berryman. (GL)
Half Price! - £350.00
 Whilst flying with A Flight of 85 Squadron on 30th July 1940, Geoffrey Allard encountered a pair of Messerschmitt Bf.110s about 40 miles from the coast, apparently patrolling near a convoy.  After Squadron Leader Townsend, flying  Red 1, had made two unsuccessful attacks, Allard closed to 150 yards and began to fire continuously, eventually closing to just 25 yards, whereupon the starboard engine of the Bf.110 began to disintegrate. This was just one of eight victories that Allard claimed during the Battle of Britain to add to a previous eight that he had scored flying Hurricanes during the Battle of France.

Close Combat by Ivan Berryman. (B)
Half Price! - £65.00

 Britain's highest scoring Typhoon ace, Wing Commander J R Baldwin sweeps above Utah Beach on a sortie in support of the Allied forces' drive into mainland Europe following D-Day in June 1944.  He is shown flying one of his personal aircraft, Typhoon 1b MN935 'JBII'.

Wing Commander J R Baldwin by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £75.00
Depicting Mustang aircraft escorting Flying Fortresses on a bombing raid over Germany.

Guardian Angel by Anthony Saunders.
Half Price! - £25.00
Our Gal Sal, a veteran of over a hundred ops, returning to base in the summer of 1944.  The peace of the  English country side is broken by the thunder of the mighty four engined bombers and keen observers will spot the rabbit scampering along the country lane as the Forts of the Bloody 100th circle the Airbase. With one engine feathered and showing signs of the gauntlet of Flak and fighters she has had to come through, the crew know they are only moments away from the safety of home.

The Veteran by Simon Smith.
Half Price! - £70.00
 On the night of 7th-8th June 1944, a Lancaster of No.207 Sqn piloted by Wing Commander John Grey was part of a force of 112 bombers and 10 Mosquitoes sent to attack a tank storage park near Cerisy-la-Foret. With the D-Day landings just 48 hours old, it was considered too risky to leave the tank park intact, should the Germans try to launch a counter thrust from this position, just 20 miles from the French coast near Bayeux. Shortly after crossing the coast, Greys aircraft was attacked by a JU.88 and both the mid upper gunner Sutherland and tail gunner McIntosh opened fire on their pursuer and sent it down in flames. No sooner had they recovered from this fright when a second JU.88 closed in on them. Again, both gunners combined their fire and destroyed the enemy aircraft in mid air. Grey pressed on to the target where their bombs fell on the enemy tank depot, also destroying some fuel dumps and an important road junction. Returning to the French coast to begin their journey home, they were attacked yet again, this time by a Messerschmitt Bf 110. With machine-like precision, McIntosh and Sutherland opened fire together, claiming their third victim in a single night. For this extraordinary feat, both gunners were awarded the DFC.

Gunners Moon by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £40.00

 

NAVAL PRINTS

Click above to see all of our naval art index - Eight random half price naval items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Naval Art Offers

Key ships of the British task force sail in close formation in the Mediterranean sea during the build up to the coalition invasion of Iraq in march 2003, nearest is the flagship HMS Ark Royal with the commando carrier HMS ocean to her port side. other ships include a Type 42 destroyer , the Fleet Auxiliary Fort Victoria and an LSL  

NTG03 - Task Force to Iraq by Ivan Berryman (AP)
Half Price! - £25.00
B64AP.  HMS Centaur Departing Devonport by Ivan Berryman.

HMS Centaur Departing Devonport by Ivan Berryman (AP)
Half Price! - £25.00
 The key to Nelsons victories always lay in his meticulous planning and the Battle of Copenghagen was no exception as he used his fleet to first destroy the Danish floating defences so that his bomb vessels could be brought up to bombard the city itself. The Danes eventually capitulated, but they had fought hard and over 2,000 men had died on both sides before the end of the battle. In this view, HMS Elephant, carrying the flag of Vice Admiral Horatio Nelson, dominates the scene as the battle gathers intensity. British ships depicted, left to right, are the Glatton (54), Elephant (74), Ganges (74) and Monarch (74)

The Battle of Copenhagen, 2nd April 1801 by Ivan Berryman. (Y)
Half Price! - £345.00
 The Leander class cruiser HMS Orion is shown departing Grand Harbour Malta late in 1945.

HMS Orion by Ivan Berryman. (AP)
Half Price! - £25.00

Bismarck, now complete and newly painted in full Baltic camouflage, returns to Hamburg for the last time as the harsh winter of 1940/41 relents and the pride of the German Kriegsmarine prepares for real action.  In the distance, the pre-Dreadnought Schleswig-Holstein awaits her next commission, the old ship alternating between vital ice-breaker and air defence duties at this time.  The Bismarck would in May 1941 put to sea and engage and sink HMS Hood only to be caught by the British battleships Rodney and King George V.  Bismarck was pounded into a floating wreck, finally being sunk by the torpedoes of HMS Dorsetshire.  From her crew of 2300 only 110 would be rescued by HMS Dorsetshire and HMS Maori.

Bismarck Entering Hamburg Harbour by Ivan Berryman. (AP)
Half Price! - £25.00
February 1942 and Viz. Admiral Ciliaxs mighty Scharnhorst leads her sister Gneisenau and Prinz Eugen up the English Channel during Operation Cerberus, their daring breakout from the port of Brest on the French Atlantic coast to the relative safety of Wilhelmshaven and Brunsbuttel. All three ships survived what became known as the Channel Dash, not without damage, but the operation proved a huge propaganda success for Germany and a crushing embarrassment for the British. A number of torpedo boats are in attendance, including Kondor and Falke and the Z class destroyer Friedrich Ihn in the distance.

Operation Cerberus, Channel Dash by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £15.00
 The pilot of a Fairey Swordfish MKII guides his aircraft towards the landing ramp of HMS Victorious following a sortie in the Mediterranean Sea 1940

Safe Return by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £15.00
 HMS Tiger is shown under full steam.

Battle of the Dogger Bank 1915 by Randall Wilson.
Half Price! - £42.50

 

MILITARY PRINTS

Click above to see all of our military art index - Eight random half price military items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Military Art Offers

 The Black Watch advance up the slopes of the hills overlooking the River Alma, defeating the Russian defenders. A British Victory in the Crimean Campaign.

Alma Forward the 42nd by Robert Gibb. (Y)
Half Price! - £30.00
 The Old Guard being asked to surrender at the end of the Battle of Waterloo.
The Last Stand of the Old Guard by Robert Hillingford. (Y)
Half Price! - £20.00
DHM327.  Portrait of Napoleon by J David.

Portrait of Napoleon by Jacques Louis David.
Half Price! - £33.00
Driven by revenge for the brutal treatment she had suffered at the hands of the Romans, Queen Boadicea led the Iceni and her allies the Trinovantas in open revolt. The IX Legion Hispania was despatched to suppress the insurrection but were ambushed en route. Only the commander Petilius Cerealis, and a handful of cavalry escaped.

Ambush of the XI Legion by Brian Palmer.
Half Price! - £60.00

Leading 30th Corps assault across the Seine at Vernon, 43rd Wessex Division gained an initial foothold on the east bank.  Heroic efforts however by the Royal Engineers of 71st, 72nd and 73rd Field Companies, succeeded in constructing a Class 9 Bailey bridge (David, shown left) and a Second Class 40 bridge (Goliath, shown right)  Despite constant enemy fire this amazing feat was achieved in only 2 days, and allowed 15/19th Hussars Cromwells and 4.7th Dragoons Guards Shermans to cross just in time to repulse a serious German counter attack by Tiger IIs of SS Panzer Abteilung 101.

David and Goliath, Vernon, France, 27th August 1944 by David Pentland. (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
 Icy rain adds its misery to the bitter conflict on Drumossie Moor. In the shadow of the Black Isle, two English ships on the waters of the Moray Firth, await the outcome of the decisive battle. Pounded by Cumberlands gunners and raked by steady musketry, the Princes brave men can make no headway. Although the Irish and French regulars refuse to give ground, the Jacobite lines gradually disintegrate. Tired, cold and hungry men flea past Culloden House for the relative safety of Inverness. On the Scottish right the Argyll Militia, supported by Hawleys Dragoons, tear down the walls of the Culwiniac and Culchunaig enclosures in an outflanking attack. Avochies men offer some resistance but Major Gillies McBean stands alone on the breach. He cuts down more than a dozen Argylls, including Lord Robert Kerr, who lies mortally wounded, but his foes are too many. The hero eventually falls to a vicious cut to the forehead, his thigh bone is also broken. Despite the cries of a mounted officer to save that brave man, the major is ruthlessly bayonetted, his back against the wall. The victory is complete and nothing more can be done. In the distance, the Young Pretender is forced to abandon the field and Scotlands hope of claiming the British Throne.

Battle of Culloden by Mark Churms. (Y)
Half Price! - £35.00
The Battle of Barnet was fought in a heavy mist, on Easter Sunday 14th April 1471. Due to a misalignment of the opposing armies, all became confusion. The centre of the battle (as depicted here) was fought at close quarters, a mass of struggling knights and men at arms with comrade fighting comrade, their vision of the battle obscured by mist. The Yorkists under the leadership of King Edward IV triumphed, leaving the Lancastrians with hopes dashed. Their champion and leader, the great Richard Neville, Earl of Warwick The King Maker lay dead, cut down while struggling to regain his charger. In the painting Edward IV charges toward the banner of Henry Holland, Duke of Exeter, while in the foreground soldiers of the Houses of York and Lancaster hack and slash at each other in terrified butchery.

Battle of Barnet by Chris Collingwood (GL)
Half Price! - £565.00
 Fought at Bouvines a village in Flanders (now part of France) Between the French army led by King Philip Augustus of France, against the combined forces of King John of England, The Holy Roman Emperor Otti IV, and Ferdinand Count of Flanders. Due to this French victory, Frederick of Hohenstaufen became Holy Roman Emperor Frederick II in 1215. and King John of England who could not wage war against France because of dwindling support was forced to sign the Magna Charter on June 15th 1215.

The Bataille de Bouvines 27th July 1214 by Horace Vernet. (Y)
Half Price! - £30.00

 

SPORT PRINTS

Click above to see all of our sport art index - Eight random half price sport items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Sport Art Offers

 On three occasions since their last Grand Slam in 1995 the England team had come within a whisker of completing another dream.  During this important build up towards the world cup England finally laid their ghost to rest.  After six years under the guidance of Head Coach Clive Woodward England, having beaten the big three from the Southern Hemisphere in a back-to-back series of matches at Twickenham, reached number one in the Zurich world ranking.  This Grand Slam, a wonderful achievement in itself, underlined Englands worldwide dominance.

2003 Grand Slam by James Owen. (Y)
Half Price! - £80.00
 With his typical degree of accuracy, Martin Smith has produced this fantastic portrait of David Coulthard, smiling as he walks towards his car in anticipation of a forthcoming race, every detail in his papers showing.
David Coulthard by Martin Smith
Half Price! - £40.00


Jason Leonard by Robert Highton. (Y)
Half Price! - £80.00
FAR695.  Tribute to Lester Piggott by Stuart McIntyre.

Tribute to Lester Piggott by Stuart McIntyre.
Half Price! - £20.00

SFA15.  Bollocks by Chris Howells.

Bollocks by Chris Howells.
Half Price! - £50.00
 Peter Deighan has superbly captured Jimmy White, John Parrot, Stephen Hendry, James Wattana, John Higgins, Ken Doherty, Ronnie OSullivan and of course the centrepiece, a magnificent study of former World Champion Steve Davis as he Ponders his next shot.  A must for all snooker rooms, clubs and players of this wonderful game.

Kings of the Baize II by Peter Deighan
Half Price! - £80.00
 TWR Jaguar XJR 9LM - Winner of the 1988 Le Mans.  The car in this image is shown at maximum speed on the Mulsanne Straight (240mph)  Drivers: Jan Lammers, Johnny Dumfries and Andy Wallace.  This was the first win for Jaguar since 1957.  Previous victories at Le Mans were in 1951 and 1953 with C types and in 1955, 1956 and 1957 with D types.  Jaguar also won Le Mans in 1990 with the XJR 12LM.
Top Cat by Graham Bosworth.
Half Price! - £24.00
Europe 18.5 - 9.5 USA.  The K Club, Straffan, Co. Kildare, Ireland, 22-24 September 2006. <br><br>Europe; Ian Woosnam - captain - Colin Montgomerie, Darren Clarke, Luke Donald, David Howell, Sergio Garcia, Paul McGinley, Lee Westwood, Paul Casey, Jose Maria Olazabel, Robert Karlsson, Padraig Harrington, Henrik Stenson. <br><br>USA; Tom Lehman - captain - Tiger Woods, Phil Mickelson, JJ Henry, David Tomms, Brett Wetterick, Stewart Cink, Jim Furyk, Chad Campbell, Chris DiMarco, Vaughan Taylor, Zach Johnson, Scott Verplank.
36th Ryder Cup 2006 by James Owen.
Half Price! - £110.00

Everything we obtain for this site is shown on the site, we do not have any more photos, crew lists or further information on any of the ships.

COPYRIGHT NOTICE. ALL IMAGES DISPLAYED ON THIS WEBSITE ARE PROTECTED BY  COPYRIGHT  LAW, AND ARE OWNED BY CRANSTON FINE ARTS OR THEIR RESPECTIVE OWNERS.  NO REPRODUCTION OR COPYING ALLOWED ON OTHER WEBSITES, BOOKS OR ARTICLES WITHOUT PRIOR AGREEMENT.

This website is owned by Cranston Fine Arts.  Torwood House, Torwoodhill Road, Rhu, Helensburgh, Scotland, G848LE

Contact: Tel: (+44) (0) 1436 820269.  Fax: (+44) (0) 1436 820473. Email:

Return to Home Page