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HMS Hermione, the 6th royal naval ship to bear the name. HMS Hermione, launched at Devonport dockyard n 1893, saw service as a naval airship depot ship and saw service during World War I.

HMS Hermione was an eight gun twin-screw cruiser launched at Devonport in 1893. In 1896 the Hermione commanded by Captain Charles R Arbuthnot, was one of a squadron of six ships which was specially commissioned in reply to a congratulatory telegram from the German Emperor President Paul Kruger on the repulse of Dr Jameson's raid. The squadron, known as the Particular Service Squadron, was commanded by Rear Admiral Alfred Taylor Dale with his flag in Revenge. In 1900 the Hermione, commanded by Captain R S D Cumming, played a minor part in the third China war or Boxer Riots. In 1906 HMS Hermione went into reserve at Portsmouth, refitted in 1907 and sent to the Capetown Station. On 14th February 1909 she ran aground at Zanzibar but was re-floated sustaining only slight damage. In June 1909 she joined the 3rd Cruiser Squadron at Portsmouth and in July joined the Home Fleet. On 6th August HMS Hermione ran aground off Killingholme in the Humber and after 8 hours was re-floated. In September 1910, she became a sea-going depot ship for the first Naval airship of the lighter-than-air type at Barrow, but when the building of this craft was abandoned, HMS Hermione rejoined the 4th division of the Home Fleet in January 1912. At the outbreak of World War I in August 1914, she became guard ship at Southampton, later becoming HQ Ship for motor launches and coastal motor boats from December 1916 until December 1919. Sold off October 1921 and resold to the Marine Society in 1922 and became training ship Warspite, finally scrapped September 1940.

Displacement: 4,360 tons  I.H.P: 9,000   Length: 320 feet.   Beam: 46ft 6ins.   Maximum draught: 19 ft.   Speed: 19.5 knots.

HMS Hermione - Name History

The sixth “HERMIONE” is a 10-gun twin-screw cruiser, launched at Devonport in 1893.  She is of 4360 tons, 9000 horse-power, and 19 knots speed.  Her length, beam, and draught were 320ft., 49ft., and 19ft.  In 1896 the “Hermione,” commanded by Captain Charles R. Arbuthnot, was one of a squadron of six ships which was specially commissioned in reply to a congratulatory telegram from the German Emperor to President Paul Kruger on the repulse of Dr. Jameson’s raid.  The squadron, known as the Particular Service Squadron, was commanded by Rear-Admiral Alfred Taylor Dale with his flag in “Revenge.”    In 1900 the “Herione,” commanded by Captain R.S.D. Cumming, played a minor part in the third China War or Boxer Riots.  Subsequently she became the seagoing depot ship for the first Naval airship of the lighter-than-air type, but when the building of this raft was abandoned, the “Hermione” reverted to ordinary fleet duties.

HMS Hermione

A reproduction of this original photo / photo-postcard size 10" x 7" approx available.  Order photograph here  © Walker Archive. Order Code  PHC049

HMS Hermione of the Special Flying Squadron

HMS Hermione was a steel, copper-sheathed second-class cruiser of the Naval Defence Act Programme and was launched in 1893. She was built at Devonport Dockyard and engined by Messrs J & G Thomson. Hermione hoisted the pennant in the Special Flying Squadron and was commanded by Captain Charles R Arbuthnot.

HMS Hermione photographed around 1900.

HMS Hermione photographed around 1910.

HMS Hermione crew c.1898

Original high quality naval magazine photograph published May 1898. Image 8" x 5" price £10.  Order code 6/216

HMS Hermione Officers c.1898

A Torpedo Just Discharged from HMS Hermione

Hoisting in the Torpedo After Exercise on HMS Hermione

Torpedo Being Sent Below to the Magazine on HMS Hermione

 
 

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AVIATION PRINTS

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 Flt. Lt. John Alexander Cruickshank in his consolidated Catalina. Winning his Victoria Cross for sinking U-347.

Sinking of U-Boat 347 by Tim Fisher.
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 Lieutenant Robert C Wattenburger shows off the unique lines of the Vought F.4U Corsair 124723 (NP-8) of VC-3 during a low-level fly-by of USS Valley Forge in May, 1952.

Valley Forge Fly-By by Ivan Berryman. (P)
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 Squadron Leader H C Sawyer is depicted here flying his 65 Sqn Spitfire Mk.1a R6799 (YT-D) in the skies above Kent on 31st July 1940 at the height of the Battle of Britain. Chasing him is Major Hans Trubenbach of 1 Gruppe, Lehrgeschwader 2 in his Messerschmitt Vf109E-3 (Red 12) . The encounter lasted eight minutes with both pilots surviving.

High Pursuit by Ivan Berryman. (D)
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 The success of Operation Bodenplatte, on January 1, 1945, was to be achieved by mass surprise attacks on British and American bases in France, Belgium and Holland. It was a battle fought at great cost to the Luftwaffe. During the battles some 300 Luftwaffe aircraft were lost. Though 200 Allied aircraft were destroyed, most on the ground, pilot losses were light. Nicolas Trudgians brilliant painting takes us right into the action above the Allied air base at Eindhoven. Me262 jets join a concentration of Me109s and Fw190s of JG-3 fighter wing, as they hurtle across the airfield in an assault that lasted 23 minutes, while Spitfires from 414 Sqn RCAF do their best to repel the attack. On the ground Typhoon fighters of 439 Sqn take a hammering.

Operation Bodenplatte by Nicolas Trudgian. (Y)
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On an RAF airfield in the early evening, a squadron of Lancaster bombers of Bomber Command prepare for another bombing sortie against targets of the German war machine.  A fitting tribute to all Bomber Command aircrew who flew in the Avro Lancatser.

Distant Dispersal by Graeme Lothian. (P)
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 The afternoon of 25th July 1940 was a desperate one for the already exhausted fighter pilots of the RAF defending the South coast of England.  As convoy CW8 made its way through the English Channel, sixty JU.87 Stukas and forty JU.88 bombers launched a brutal attack on the ships below, backed up by fighter cover of over 50 Messerscmitt Bf.109s.  Eight Spitfires of 64 Sqn (Kenley) were scrambled, together with twelve Spitfires of 54 Sqn (Hornchurch) and Hurricanes of 111 Sqn from Croydon.  The British pilots found themselves massively outnumbered, but nevertheless put up a spirited fight against the teeming enemy.  This painting shows Spitfires of 54 Sqn entering the fray, the pilots scattering as they choose their targets and go after the JU.87s. To the right of this, Bf.109Es of JG.26 are roaring in to join battle, whilst Adolf Gallands aircraft engages a Hurricane of 111 Sqn.

A Day for Heroes by Ivan Berryman.
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 A pair of De Havilland Mosquito NF. MkII night fighters of 23 Squadron, based at Bradwell Bay, Essex in 1942.

Night Raiders by Ivan Berryman. (B)
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Dakota G-AMPZ (formerly KN442) of Air Atlantique resplendent in the commemorative livery of RAF Transport Command heads out across the English coast, back to Berlin?  Still flying more than 50 years after serving valiantly on the Berlin Airlift, this aircraft carries out the bulk of the airlines passenger charters.  These prints are signed by the current crew.
Perpetual Motion II by Robert Tomlin.
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NAVAL PRINTS

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The pride of the British fleet, The Mighty Hood as she was known, was launched in 1918.  Weighing in at over 40,000 tons she was 860 feet long and had eight 15 inch guns, at her launch she was more than a match for any adversary.  Hood sailed the world in the inter-war years and was admired in every foreign port she visited, however with a lack of major refits in this time the second world war found the Hood unprepared for a major battle,  On the 24th of May 1941 the German battleship Bismarck found Hoods achilles heel within only a few salvos, namely her inadequate deck armour.  Hood exploded in a huge fireball from which only three sailors survived.  Here HMS Hood is seen with Force H in the Mediterranean.  Winston Churchill knew that the powerful French fleet at Mers-el-Kebir could fall into German hands at any time and that the threat had to be removed by any means.  On the 3rd of July 1940 the French fleet was duly dispatched by Force H.  The Strasbourg being the only French battleship able to make her escape.  Hodd is depicted opening fire at 17.55 hours with the battleships Resolution and the destroyer HMS Foxhound to her stern.

HMS Hood - Operation Catapult by Anthony Saunders (P)
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B69AP. HMS Valiant and HMS Queen Elizabeth at Alexandria by Ivan Berryman.

HMS Valiant and HMS Queen Elizabeth at Alexandria by Ivan Berryman (AP)
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HMS Hood makes a turn to port, while in line and astern is HMS Collingwood.  Valetta can be seen in the distance.

HMS Hood at Malta 1896 By Randall Wilson.
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 USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) refuels an Adams class Destroyer during a dusk operation off the Vietnam coast as a pair of E8 Crusaders are readied for launch on the forward catapults.

USS Kitty Hawk by Ivan Berryman. (Y)
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 Launched on the Clyde on 1st February 2006, HMS Daring was the first of six Type 45 AAW destroyers ordered for the Royal Navy, the type representing a massive leap forward in technology and capability.  HMS Daring was officially handed over to the Royal Navy on 10th December 2008 and is depicted here in liaison with a Merlin helicopter.

HMS Daring by Ivan Berryman. (P)
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 The Flower Class corvette HMS Sunflower at sea in 1942. One of thirty ordered on 31st August 1939, K41 was built by Smiths Dockyard in just 9 months and 6 days, completed on 25th January 1941.

HMS Sunflower by Ivan Berryman.
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With her mizzen top already gone and her sails aloft having received severe punishment, Victory breaks through the line behind the French flagship Bucentaure, delivering a shattering broadside into her stern.  So severe was this opening fire that the Bucentaure was effectively put out of the rest of the battle, although Admiral Villeneuve himself was to miraculously survive the carnage.  Beyong Victory can be seen the French Redoubtable, which is receiving fire from Victorys starboard guns, and the Spanish San Leandro is in the extreme distance.  Most of Victorys stunsails have been cut away, but it was her stunsail booms that became entangled with the rigging of the Redoubtable when she put her helm to port and ran onto her.  Admiral Nelson fell shortly afterward, having received a fatal wound from a musket ball fired by a French sharpshooter in Redoubtables mizzen fighting top.  The Temeraire can be seen approaching the fray to the right.

Trafalgar - The Destruction of the Bucentaure by Ivan Berryman.
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 HMS Medway was the first Royal navy submarine Depot ship that was designed for the purpose from the outset. She is shown here with a quintet of T-class submarines on her starboard side, whilst an elderly L-Class begins  to move away having completed replenishment. HMS Medway was sunk on 30th June 1940 having been torpedoed by U-372 off Alexandria.

HMS Medway by Ivan Berryman (AP)
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MILITARY PRINTS

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The Battle of Marathon 490 BC during the Persian Greek Wars. King Darious I of Persia sent his son in law Mardonius to invade Greece in 492 BC.  The Persian Forces conquered Thrace and Macedonia before their fleet was devastated by a storm. Mardonia was forced to return to Asia.  A second Persian invasion force crossed the Aegean sea. After conquering Eretria, the Persian Army under Datis (15,000 strong) landed near Marathon.  (Marathon is 24 miles northeast of Athens.) General Miltiades, general in the Greek army gathered a force of 10,000 Athenians and 1,000 Plataean citizen Soldiers.

Battle of Marathon by Brian Palmer (P)
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Robert the Bruce, the victor of Bannockburn is shown asleep with sword in hand in one of the smaller historical paintings by Sir William Allen.
After the Battle by Sir William Allen. (Y)
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The British Troops resuming the attack on the Sikh Entrenched Camp.  Battle fought during the First Sikh War, by a force of 16,000 Anglo-Indian troops under the command of General Sir Hugh Gough.  On the evening of 21st December the British Force unsuccessfully attempted to take the Sikh entrenched position commanded by Lal Singh with an army of 50,000 Sikh troops.  When nightfall came the British retired overnight.  At dawn they attacked again, this time the Sikh line eventually collapsed and fled the field leaving behind 7,000 casualties.  British and Indian losses were 694 killed with 1,721 wounded.  This was one of the bloodiest battles in the east during the 19th century.

Battle of Ferozeshah by Henry Martens.
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<b>Two small marks on the image which would not be noticeable once framed. </b>

Sir Frances Drake by Chris Collingwood. (Y)
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 When 250 well armed and trained rebel tribesmen attacked the small SAS outpost at Mirbat few would have given good odds on their survival.  At the height of the battle Corporal Labalaba and Trooper Savesaki, both Fijians and both wounded fought off relentless assaults by the attacking Adoo.  Firing a World War II vintage 25pdr field gun at point blank range Labalaba finally fell to a snipers bullet just as Captain Kealy and Trooper Tobin reached the gunpit to aid its defence.  Within minutes however Tobin was dead, but Kealy and the remaining defenders critical position was saved by the timely arrival of 2 Omani Strikemaster jets, and helicopters carrying 24 men of G Squadron. 

Sacrifice at Mirbat, Dhofar, Oman, 19th July 1972 by David Pentland. (P)
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DHM821.  Austrian Generals Watching the Battle by Albrecht Adam.
Austrian Generals Watching the Battle by Albrecht Adam.
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 Themistocles had chosen the narrow waters at the entrance to the bay well. The Persians could not bring their larger fleet to bear on the smaller Greek fleet and due to the design and manoeuverability of the Greek Triremes, the Greek fleet sailed down the right channel next to Salamis and turned to ram the Persian fleet as it entered the bay. The Persian captains tried frantically to turn their ships but their oars became entangled and the turning manoeuvre caused the ships to run into each other. The Greek Triremes were able to ram the leading Persian ships, disengage and ram again. This was a great victory for Themistocles who lost only 70 ships from his fleet of 380 Triremes, compared to the loss of over 600 ships from the Persian fleet of over 1,000.

Battle of Salamis, 23rd September 480BC by Wilhelm von Kaulbach. (Y)
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 Having made contact the previous evening with troops of 4th Infantry Division pushing inland from Utah Beach, paratroopers of the 101st Airborne division The Screaming Eagles help mop up the pockets of German resistance in their general advance towards Carentan.

Screaming Eagles in Normandy, 7th June 1944 by David Pentland. (P)
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SPORT PRINTS

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 The Intercontinental Formula was first organised by British Racing Drivers Club to allow the racing of cars with 2000cc to 3000cc engines. At the time the 1500cc limit of Formula 1 had been instituted by the international ruling body in the belief that the smaller cars would mean safer racing. In reality this meant that the relatively easy to handle Formula 1 cars could be driven by less experienced drivers almost as fast as the most experienced master drivers. The result was that the car with fractionally more power was the deciding factor in winning the race, rather than the better driver but this also compromised track safety. The introduction of the Intercontinental Formula was seen as more of a challenge for the drivers, with the larger and more powerful cars requiring greater skill and experience than to drive the 1500cc cars of Formula 1. The 13th International Trophy on Saturday 6th May 1961 was the first race of the season to carry World Championship points and consisted of 80 laps of Silverstone, a total of 233 miles. Stirling Moss, having already won the International Sports Car Race in a Lotus earlier that day, was driving Rob Walkers 2.5 litre Cooper Climax and qualified 2nd on the grid despite being unhappy with the steering of his car. The starting grid front row was Bruce McLaren, Stirling Moss, Jack Brabham and Graham Hill and by the time the race started at 2.30pm a heavy rain meant that the track was not only soaked but also covered in oil and rubber from the previous races. World Champion Jack Brabham made a superb start, passed Moss and was first into Copse and by lap 4 Moss was in 3rd place led by Surtees and Brabham. Due to appalling conditions and poor visibility many of the cars were spinning or leaving the track and by lap 13 Brabham and Moss were 1st and 2nd with the rest of the field some distance behind. Moss now poured on the pressure and for the next few laps he tried to pass as he harried Brabham in a duel for the lead. The pair were now beginning to lap the tailenders and, at around a quarter of the distance Moss was held up by Flockhart, Brabhams team member, who had allowed Brabham to pass. Moss gestured angrily to Flockhart as he was unable to follow Brabham and, as the rain paused for a while the pace became faster. Suddenly and quite dramatically Moss passed both Flockhart and Brabham and within 2 laps had gained 5 seconds on the World Champion. As the rain returned in a deluge Moss mercilessly pushed on, increasing his lead to 1.5 minutes by the halfway mark. Although he could have taken things easily at this point Moss drove on relentlessly at a seemingly impossible pace and was now lapping most of the field for a second time. By the ¾ stage he completed his humiliation of Brabham by passing him for a second time to lap him representing a 3 mile lead. Moss eventually won the race in 2hrs 41 mins 19.2 secs, 1.5 laps ahead of Brabham and at least two laps ahead of the rest of the field in what were treacherous conditions. At the end of the race Moss summed up the experience as a nice ride, having proved himself to be one of the greatest and fastest drivers in the world under any conditions. Sir Stirling Moss believes this to be one of his finest ever drives.

A Moment of Triumph by Gerald Coulson. (Y)
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SPC5003. Rory Underwood by Rodger Towers.

Rory Underwood by Rodger Towers.
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 The Welsh Six Nations Grand Slam of 2005 is completed as Wales beat Ireland in their final game. <br>Results : Cardiff, 5th February : Wales 11 - 9 England<br>Rome, 12th February : Italy 8 - 38 Wales<br>Paris, 26th February : France 18 - 24 Wales<br>Edinburgh, 13th March : Scotland 22 - 46 Wales<br>Cardiff, 19th March : Wales 32 - 20 Ireland.

Grand Slam 2005 by James Owen. (Y)
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SFA18.  Going Home by Chris Howells.

Going Home by Chris Howells.
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B45. David Coulthard/ Williams FW.17 by Ivan Berryman

David Coulthard/ Williams FW.17 by Ivan Berryman
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Florida Pearl is an Irish-bred race horse, who raced in the late 1990s and early 2000s. Florida Pearl was owned by Mrs Violet O'Leary and trained by top Irish trainer Willie Mullins.  The 2001/02 season proved to be successful for Florida Pearl, winning the John Durkan Memorial Chase.  Florida Pearl then returned to Kempton to win the King George VI Chase beating Best Mate in December.  He returned back to England for his next start in the Grade 2 Martell Cup Chase where he cruised to an 11 length victory over Cyfor Malta.  The painting shows Florida Pearl over the one of the nineteen fences to win the Martell Cup at Aintree in 2002, with Jockey  Barry Geraghty.

Florida Pearl by Stephen Smith.
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SP4AP.  Desert Orchid by Mark Churms.

Desert Orchid by Mark Churms (AP)
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The painting portrays the Manchester United midfielder and England Captain David Beckham celebrating after scoring from a trademark free kick.

Seven by Robert Highton. (Y)
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