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HMS Hermione, the 6th royal naval ship to bear the name. HMS Hermione, launched at Devonport dockyard n 1893, saw service as a naval airship depot ship and saw service during World War I.

HMS Hermione was an eight gun twin-screw cruiser launched at Devonport in 1893. In 1896 the Hermione commanded by Captain Charles R Arbuthnot, was one of a squadron of six ships which was specially commissioned in reply to a congratulatory telegram from the German Emperor President Paul Kruger on the repulse of Dr Jameson's raid. The squadron, known as the Particular Service Squadron, was commanded by Rear Admiral Alfred Taylor Dale with his flag in Revenge. In 1900 the Hermione, commanded by Captain R S D Cumming, played a minor part in the third China war or Boxer Riots. In 1906 HMS Hermione went into reserve at Portsmouth, refitted in 1907 and sent to the Capetown Station. On 14th February 1909 she ran aground at Zanzibar but was re-floated sustaining only slight damage. In June 1909 she joined the 3rd Cruiser Squadron at Portsmouth and in July joined the Home Fleet. On 6th August HMS Hermione ran aground off Killingholme in the Humber and after 8 hours was re-floated. In September 1910, she became a sea-going depot ship for the first Naval airship of the lighter-than-air type at Barrow, but when the building of this craft was abandoned, HMS Hermione rejoined the 4th division of the Home Fleet in January 1912. At the outbreak of World War I in August 1914, she became guard ship at Southampton, later becoming HQ Ship for motor launches and coastal motor boats from December 1916 until December 1919. Sold off October 1921 and resold to the Marine Society in 1922 and became training ship Warspite, finally scrapped September 1940.

Displacement: 4,360 tons  I.H.P: 9,000   Length: 320 feet.   Beam: 46ft 6ins.   Maximum draught: 19 ft.   Speed: 19.5 knots.

HMS Hermione - Name History

The sixth “HERMIONE” is a 10-gun twin-screw cruiser, launched at Devonport in 1893.  She is of 4360 tons, 9000 horse-power, and 19 knots speed.  Her length, beam, and draught were 320ft., 49ft., and 19ft.  In 1896 the “Hermione,” commanded by Captain Charles R. Arbuthnot, was one of a squadron of six ships which was specially commissioned in reply to a congratulatory telegram from the German Emperor to President Paul Kruger on the repulse of Dr. Jameson’s raid.  The squadron, known as the Particular Service Squadron, was commanded by Rear-Admiral Alfred Taylor Dale with his flag in “Revenge.”    In 1900 the “Herione,” commanded by Captain R.S.D. Cumming, played a minor part in the third China War or Boxer Riots.  Subsequently she became the seagoing depot ship for the first Naval airship of the lighter-than-air type, but when the building of this raft was abandoned, the “Hermione” reverted to ordinary fleet duties.

HMS Hermione

A reproduction of this original photo / photo-postcard size 10" x 7" approx available.  Order photograph here  © Walker Archive. Order Code  PHC049

HMS Hermione of the Special Flying Squadron

HMS Hermione was a steel, copper-sheathed second-class cruiser of the Naval Defence Act Programme and was launched in 1893. She was built at Devonport Dockyard and engined by Messrs J & G Thomson. Hermione hoisted the pennant in the Special Flying Squadron and was commanded by Captain Charles R Arbuthnot.

HMS Hermione photographed around 1900.

HMS Hermione photographed around 1910.

HMS Hermione crew c.1898

Original high quality naval magazine photograph published May 1898. Image 8" x 5" price £10.  Order code 6/216

HMS Hermione Officers c.1898

A Torpedo Just Discharged from HMS Hermione

Hoisting in the Torpedo After Exercise on HMS Hermione

Torpedo Being Sent Below to the Magazine on HMS Hermione

 
 

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AVIATION PRINTS

Click above to see all of our aviation art index - Eight random half price aviation items are displayed to the right.

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 One of 6,176 Halifaxes built during World War II, NA337(2P-X) was shot down over Norway on 23rd April 1945.  In 1995 it was recovered from the lake that had been its watery home for fifty years and has now been restored by the Halifax Aircraft Association in Ontario, Canada.

Halifax Mk.III NA337 by Ivan Berryman. (E)
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 Soldiers aboard a Merlin helicopter over Helmand Province, Afghanistan, 2010.

Soldiers Over Helmand by Graeme Lothian. (P)
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 On 27th November 1950, thousands of Chinese troops swarmed over the frozen Yalu river on the North Korean /Chinese border, cutting off US Marines in the Chosin Reservoir area. Over the next ten days the marines with air support from both the Navy and Marine Air Wings fought their way out of the trap to Hungnam and safety.

Frozen Chosin, Korea, December 1950 by David Pentland. (GL)
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 Lancasters of 617 Sqn Dambusters get airborne from their Scampton base at the start of their journey to the Ruhr Valley on the night of 16th May 1943 under the codename Operation Chastise. These are aircraft of the First Wave, led by Wing Commander Guy Gibson, the Second Wave having already departed some ten minutes earlier to negotiate a more northerly route to their targets. On this momentous night, both the Möhne and Eder dams were successfully breached, whilst the Sorpe was also hit, but without serious damage. Of the nineteen aircraft that took part in the mission, eleven returned safely.

The Dambusters by Ivan Berryman. (Y)
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Magdeburg, Germany, 10th April 1945.  Attacking from behind and above, ObLt.Walter Schuck, Staffelkapitain of 3./JG7, ripped through the massed boxes of 8th Airforce B17s, downing four in a single high speed pass.

Deadly Pass by David Pentland. (P)
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 210 Squadron RAF 1918.

Homeward Bound - Sopwith Camel by David Pentland. (Y)
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A Tribute to Sir Thomas Sopwith by Roderick Lovejoy.
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 In one of the finest portrayals of the Avro Lancaster, Moonlight Run depicts the aircraft of Fl. Lt. Mickey Martin (ED909 AJ-P) at the moment of release of the Wallace Bomb during the Dams raid on the Ruhr in 1943. With only the gentlest of moonlight rippling over the dark water of the Mohne, this dramatic picture plays homage to the impossible low altitudes and high speeds that were necessary to complete successfully their heroic mission. A stark and refreshing treatment of a subject at the hearts of all aviation historians.

Moonlight Run (Dambusters) by Ivan Berryman. (Y)
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NAVAL PRINTS

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 The largest and fastest of all the ships that took part in the Battle of Jutland, the elegant battle cruiser HMS Tiger was launched in 1913 and is easily recognisable by the unusual position of Q turret just aft of the third funnel, She is shown about  to pass beneath the Forth Bridge as she departs Rosyth for a sea trial

HMS Tiger by Ivan Berryman (AP)
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  HMS Norfolk and HMS Belfast of Force I are shown engaging the Scharnhorst which has already been hit and disabled by both HMS Duke of York and the cruiser HMS Jamaica.  Scharnhorst was never to escape the clutches of the British and Norwegian forces for, having been slowed to just a few knots by numerous hits, fell victim to repeated torpedo attacks by the allied cruisers and destroyers that had trapped the German marauder.

HMS Norfolk at the Battle of the North Cape by Ivan Berryman (P)
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B114.  HMS Carmania sinking the German armed liner SS Cap Trafalgar off Ilha da Trindade, South Atlantic. 14th September 1914.  By Ivan Berryman.
HMS Carmania sinking the German armed liner SS Cap Trafalgar off Ilha da Trindade, South Atlantic. 14th September 1914. By Ivan Berryman.
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The nuclear-powered submarine HMS Repulse (S23) manoeuvres in preparation to berth at HMS Dolphin in Portsmouth harbour in the late 1970s.

HMS Dolphin by Ivan Berryman. (AP)
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At 12.30pm on the 21st of October 1805, Admiral Lord Nelson on board his flagship, HMS Victory, breaks the line of the combined French and Spanish fleets.  The Victory is delivering a devastating stern rake to the 80 gun French ship Bucentaure, the flagship of the combined fleets, commanded by Vice-Admiral P. C. J. B. S. Villeneuve.  Starboard to the Victory is the 74 gun Redoutable.  This ship, the Victory and HMS Temeraire, seen left, became locked together soon after, the unequal exchange resulting in the Redoutable having the highest casualties during the entire battle.

Breaking the Line at the Battle of Trafalgar by Graeme Lothian. (AP)
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 The Type VII U-Boat became the standard design for German submarine warfare during the Second World War, sometimes hunting in packs, but more often alone. This Type VIIC has just claimed another victim, surfacing under the cover of night to observe the fiery demise of another victim.

Lone Wolf by Ivan Berryman.
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 HMS Intrepid embarks some of her landing craft during the Falklands conflict of 1982.
HMS Intrepid by Ivan Berryman (P)
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DHM120.  The Battle of Trafalgar by W Stuart.

The Battle of Trafalgar by William Stuart.
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MILITARY PRINTS

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Rome AD52, Gladiatorial Combat under the eyes of the Emperor Claudius (actual name, Tiberius Claudius Drusus Nero) a great supporter of the games. Seen are the Net and Trident fighter Retiarius matched with a more heavily armed Mirmillone, whilst in the background a successful Secutor seeks permission for the killing stroke.

Morituri Te Saluttant (For Those About to Die Salute You) by Chris Collingwood (GL)
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 Commandos of 1st Special Service Brigade, led by Lord Lovat, are piped past the defenders of the Caen canal (Pegasus) bridge by piper Bill Millin. The bridge was originally taken in a coup de main attack by the gliders of 6th Airborne Divisions D Company, 2nd battalion Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry, led by Major John Howard earlier that morning. Shortly afterwards the glider troops were reinforced by 7 Parachute Battalion, and together they held the area against German attacks until the main British forces landing at Sword beach could fight through to join them.

Piper Bill, Pegasus Bridge, Normandy, 13.00hrs, 6th June 1944 by David Pentland. (Y)
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DHM352B.  Battle of Leipzig, 16th-18th October 1813 by David Rowlands.

Battle of Leipzig, 16th-18th October 1813 by David Rowlands (B)
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 Kursk, Central Russia, 1st July 1943.  Sdkfz 232 heavy armoured car and Sdkfz 247 light armoured car of the Reconnaissance battalion, 11th Panzer Division, scouting enemy dispositions prior to the Kursk offensive.

Scouting Ahead by David Pentland. (P)
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Bohemian Revolt 1618-1623 includes the following battles, Pilsen, Sablat, White Mountain, Wiesloch, Wimpfen, Höchst, Fleurus I, Stadtlohn.   Danish Revolt 1626-1628: Dessau Bridge, Lutter am Barenberge, Stralsund I, Wolgast.   Swedish Revolt 1631-1634: Frankfurt on the Oder, Magdeburg, Weben, Breitenfeld I, Rain, Fürth, Lützen I, Nördlingen I. Swedish-French 1636-1648: Wittstock, Rheinfelden, Breisach, Breitenfeld II, Rocroi, Tuttlingen, Freiburg, Jankau, Mergentheim, Nördlingen II, Zusmarshausen, Prague II, Lens.
Wallenstein, A Scene From the Thirty Years War by Ernest Crofts
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1st Battalion Cheshire Regiment at Audregneis, 24th August 1914 by David Rowlands. (Y)
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The Battle at Rorke's Drift, also known as the Defence of Rorke's Drift, was an action in the Anglo-Zulu War. The defence of the mission station of Rorke's Drift, under the command of Lieutenant John Chard of the Royal Engineers, immediately followed the British Army's defeat at the Battle of Isandlwana on 22nd January 1879, and continued into the following day, 23rd January.  150 British and colonial troops successfully defended the garrison against an intense assault by approximately 2000 Zulu warriors. The intense and noisy Zulu attacks on Rorke's Drift came very close to defeating the tiny garrison, but were ultimately repelled by blasts of Martini-Henry rifle fire-and some smart bayonet work-with some guts behind the bayonet thrusts! Eleven Victoria Crosses were awarded to the defenders, along with a number of other decorations and honours. Of particular note in the painting is the dog 'Pip' - he survived Isandlwhana by retreating along the fugitive's trail to Rorke's Drift. During the Zulu attacks on Rorke's drift, Pip did his part in the defence - by jumping on the mealie bag parapets and barking at Zulus- who were hiding in the long grass and sneaking up to the defences, then biting any Zulu who came within range. Unfortunately Pip was not officially recognised for his part in the action. He was not awarded a VC, on the basis that he was a volunteer canine that accompanied an officer, rather than a War Office issued canine. Conversely, if Pip had been killed, then he would not have been officially listed as a casualty, as he accompanied the army in a strictly private capacity. British army horses were in a different category as they were War Office issue, therefore the loss of a horse in action, or to disease, carried a financial liability for the War Office.

The Defence of Rorke's Drift by Jason Askew. (P)
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 Study for the original painting Richard III at the Battle of Bosworth.
Page to Richard III, Bosworth 1485 by Mark Churms. (P)
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SPORT PRINTS

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A montage of moments from the outstanding Welsh 6 Nation Championship Grand Slam Victory of 2005.
The Perfect Year - Wales Grand Slam Champions 2005 by Darren Baker. (Y)
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Race horses gallop to the finish shown in this racing painting by Mark Churms.

The Finish by Mark Churms.
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B49. Damon Hill/ Williams FW.17 by Ivan Berryman

Damon Hill/ Williams FW.17 by Ivan Berryman
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 The Intercontinental Formula was first organised by British Racing Drivers Club to allow the racing of cars with 2000cc to 3000cc engines. At the time the 1500cc limit of Formula 1 had been instituted by the international ruling body in the belief that the smaller cars would mean safer racing. In reality this meant that the relatively easy to handle Formula 1 cars could be driven by less experienced drivers almost as fast as the most experienced master drivers. The result was that the car with fractionally more power was the deciding factor in winning the race, rather than the better driver but this also compromised track safety. The introduction of the Intercontinental Formula was seen as more of a challenge for the drivers, with the larger and more powerful cars requiring greater skill and experience than to drive the 1500cc cars of Formula 1. The 13th International Trophy on Saturday 6th May 1961 was the first race of the season to carry World Championship points and consisted of 80 laps of Silverstone, a total of 233 miles. Stirling Moss, having already won the International Sports Car Race in a Lotus earlier that day, was driving Rob Walkers 2.5 litre Cooper Climax and qualified 2nd on the grid despite being unhappy with the steering of his car. The starting grid front row was Bruce McLaren, Stirling Moss, Jack Brabham and Graham Hill and by the time the race started at 2.30pm a heavy rain meant that the track was not only soaked but also covered in oil and rubber from the previous races. World Champion Jack Brabham made a superb start, passed Moss and was first into Copse and by lap 4 Moss was in 3rd place led by Surtees and Brabham. Due to appalling conditions and poor visibility many of the cars were spinning or leaving the track and by lap 13 Brabham and Moss were 1st and 2nd with the rest of the field some distance behind. Moss now poured on the pressure and for the next few laps he tried to pass as he harried Brabham in a duel for the lead. The pair were now beginning to lap the tailenders and, at around a quarter of the distance Moss was held up by Flockhart, Brabhams team member, who had allowed Brabham to pass. Moss gestured angrily to Flockhart as he was unable to follow Brabham and, as the rain paused for a while the pace became faster. Suddenly and quite dramatically Moss passed both Flockhart and Brabham and within 2 laps had gained 5 seconds on the World Champion. As the rain returned in a deluge Moss mercilessly pushed on, increasing his lead to 1.5 minutes by the halfway mark. Although he could have taken things easily at this point Moss drove on relentlessly at a seemingly impossible pace and was now lapping most of the field for a second time. By the ¾ stage he completed his humiliation of Brabham by passing him for a second time to lap him representing a 3 mile lead. Moss eventually won the race in 2hrs 41 mins 19.2 secs, 1.5 laps ahead of Brabham and at least two laps ahead of the rest of the field in what were treacherous conditions. At the end of the race Moss summed up the experience as a nice ride, having proved himself to be one of the greatest and fastest drivers in the world under any conditions. Sir Stirling Moss believes this to be one of his finest ever drives.

A Moment of Triumph by Gerald Coulson. (Y)
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FAR635. Muirfield - 13th Hole by Mark Chadwick

Muirfield - 13th Hole by Mark Chadwick
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 M. Schumacher / JP Montoya.  Brazilian GP 2001.

Close Encounters by Michael Thompson.
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Michael Atherton by Keith Fearon.
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 Colin McRae and Nicky Grist.  Ford Focus WRC
High Flier by Michael Thompson.
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