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HMS Centurion, 60 gun ship of the line launched at Portsmouth in 1732 and commissioned in 1734. She served in the Home Fleet and took part in the expedition to Lisbon by Sir John Norris. In 1738 she was captained by George Anson and led a small squadron to the African coast then to Jamaica and back to England. In 1740 she started her famous circumnavigation being the only ship to survive the entire voyage and capturing the Spanish galleon Nuestra Senora de Cavadonga. After being cut down to a 50 gun ship she took part in the first battle of Finisterre.

 The fourth Centurion built and in 1740 she was the flagship of Commodore George Anson in a squadron of 7 ships who were brought up to complement by 500 superannuated and Chelsea out-pensioners, who all died during the voyage. They sailed on Anson's famous circumnavigation of the world in September 1740. They touched at Madeira and Port St Julian, and off Cape Horn in March 1741 the squadron were dispersed by a succession of gales. Scurvy broke out and the Centurion buried 43 men. She reached Juan Fernandez in June 1741 with 130 men on the sick list, besides having buried 200 men on the passage. Here a prize was captured, and the squadron set sail for the South American coast, capturing another prize on the way. They arrived in Payta Bay in November and surprised the town. Plunder to the value of £32,000 and other stores were taken; the town was set on fire and six vessels in the bay were sunk. In May 1742 the Commodore sailed for China. In August the Centurion anchored off one of the Ladrone Islands and landed 128 sick men, many of whom died. In November the ship arrived off Macao and wintered. In April 1743 Anson put to sea in an attempt to capture the large Spanish galleon trading between Acapulco and Manilla. On June 20th she was sighted off the Island of Samar, and proved to be the long-sought ship Nuestra Senora de Cavadonga. An action followed and lasted nearly two hours, at the end of which the Spaniard struck with a loss of 67 killed and 84 wounded. The Centurion lost only 2 killed and 17 wounded. The cargo of the prize included nearly one and a half million dollars, besides 36,000 ounces of silver and other merchandise. On July 10th the squadron reached Canton, and in December sold the prize at Macao. Numerous difficulties with the Chinese were experienced. In December 1743 the Centurion turned homewards, and reached Spithead on June 15th 1744. Thus ended Commodore George Anson's circumnavigation of the globe, a great naval exploring expedition with war-like objects, carried out with the greatest skill, patience and perseverance.

As the Admiralty declined to confirm Anson's first Lieutenant as captain, Anson returned his own commission as Rear-Admiral of the Blue, and went on half pay as a captain for six months. There is not a doubt that Anson was in the wrong. A change of Government taking place some ten months afterwards, Anson became a Lord of the Admiralty, and being promoted to Rear-Admiral of the White received two steps at once.

The figurehead of this centurion was a big lion some sixteen feet high. It was presented to the Duke of Richmond by King George III when the Centurion was broken up. While serving as an inn sign at Goodwood it was much admired by King William IV, who begged it from the Duke, and used it as a staircase ornament at Windsor Castle. The King later on presented it to Greenwich Hospital, with directions to place it in one of the wards, which he desired should be called the Anson Ward. It remained there until 1871 when it was removed to the playground of the Naval School, where owing to the action of the weather it unfortunately crumbled to pieces. At one time the following lines were inscribed beneath it:-

Stay, traveller, a while, and view

One who has travelled more than you;

Quite round the globe, thro' each degree,

Anson and I have ploughed the sea.

Torrid and frigid zones have pass'd

And-safe ashore arrived at last-

In ease with dignity appear,

He in the House of Lords-I here.

In 1746 the Centurion was cut down to a 50 gun ship. In 1747 the Centurion commanded by Captain Peter Denis, was in an English fleet of 17 ships under the command of Vice-Admiral George Anson, who flew his flag in Prince George. The French fleet, under Admiral de la Jonquiere, consisted of 14 men-of-war and a convoy of 24 ships, and was sighted on May 23rd about 70 miles from Cape Finisterre. The French made off and Anson chased. A running fight of 3 hours followed, in which 13 French ships were captured, while a small detached squadron captured six of the French convoy. Night saved the rest. A topical song of the time expresses in the following verses the part played by the Centurion:

The Centurion first led the van, (bis)

And held 'em till we came up;

Then we their hides did sorely bang,

Our broadsides we on them did pour, (bis)

We gave the French a sower drench,

And soon their topsails made them lower.

 

And when they saw our fleet come up, (bis)

They for quarters call'd without delay,

And their colours they that moment struck

O! how we did rejoice and sing, (bis)

To see such prizes we had took,

For ourselves and for George our King.

The French lost 700 killed and wounded, and the English 520, including one captain killed. Specie to the value of £300,000 was taken from the prizes. This victory was valuable if not brilliant. Vie-Admiral Anson was created a Peer and the captured men-of-war were all added to the British Navy.

In June 1751 the Centurion, flying the broad pennant of Commodore the Hon. Augustus Keppel, proceeded to Algiers, and smoothed over some difficulties with the Dey. The story goes that the Dey angrily expressed surprise that the King of Great Britain should have sent a beardless boy to treat with him. Keppel replied: "Had my master supposed that wisdom was measured by the length of the beard, he would have sent your Deyship a he-goat." After threatening Keppel with death, the Dey consented to treat.

In 1754, the Centurion, Captain the Hon. Augustus Keppel, in company with the Norwich, escorted to North America a large number of troops, destined to assist the colonials in the suppression of the Indians, who with France behind them as moral support, were rising against the English whites.

In 1759 the Centurion, commanded by Captain William Mantell, was in a fleet of 49 ships besides transports under Vice-Admiral Charles Saunders with his flag in Neptune. They left Spithead on February 17th and, having secured pilots by a ruse, they anchored a few miles below Quebec on June 26th with nearly 10,000 troops. On June 28th the French sent down seven fireships and two firerafts, but these were grappled and towed clear by the activity of the seamen. On September 13th under cover of the guns of the Centurion, the troops were landed and attacked Quebec. The seamen assisted with guns. On this day both General Wolfe and the Marquis of Montcalm, the English and French Commanders-in-Chief of the troops were mortally wounded. After some fighting the French retired. Additional ships were brought up to bombard, and on the 17th the enemy offered to surrender. On the 18th Vice-Admiral Saunders was one of the signatories to the surrender.

In May 1762 the Centurion, commanded by Captain James Galbraith, was in the English fleet proceeding to Havana against the Spaniards, which consisted of 53 ships, besides storeships, hospital ships and transports, with 15,000 troops. Admiral Sir George Pocock, with his flag in Namur, and George, Earl of Albemarle, were the naval and military Commanders-in-Chief. On May 27th the fleet of 200 sail in all stood away for the Old Strait of Bahama, which was safely navigated by marking the dangerous shoals and reefs with boats. During the passage two Spanish ships were captured. On June 6th the fleet arrived off Havana, and while a feint was made elsewhere the troops were landed under cover of the guns of the fleet. Moro was bombarded, although the Spaniards made a most gallant defence, Havana fell, and the British took complete possession on August 14th 1762. Specie and stores to the value of three million pounds were captured; thirteen Spanish men-of-war were destroyed, three were sunk, and two on the stocks were burned. While on the passage to Havana some ships were detached and captured two ships in the harbour of Mariel. The British lost 1790 killed and wounded. The division of the prize money caused some heartburning. It worked out as follows: Admiral £123,000, captain £1600, petty officer £17, seaman or marine £4.

In 1769 the Centurion was broken up at Chatham.

 

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AVIATION PRINTS

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Some Current Half Price Aviation Art Offers

 A pair of Spitfire Mk.IXEs of 611 Squadron make their way home from a patrol during the summer of 1942. At this time 611 Squadron were based at Kenley and were the first squadron to receive the new Mk.IX putting it on equal terms, for the first time, with the formidable Focke-Wulf 190.

Spitfire Mk.IXE by Ivan Berryman. (Y)
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 Avro Lancaster Mk.I R5868 of No.467 Squadron RAAF over the Lincolnshire countryside.  This aircraft became the second highest scoring Lancaster with 137 operations to its credit and is today preserved at the Royal Air Force Museum.

Old Sugar by John Young. (Y)
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 No one will ever know exactly what caused Max Immelmanns demise, but what is known is that his propeller was seen to disintegrate, which caused a series violent oscillations that ripped the Fokker E.III apart, the tail breaking away before the wings folded back, trapping the young German ace in his cockpit. The popular belief is that his interrupter gear malfunctioned, causing him to shoot away part of his own propeller, but British reports attribute Immelmanns loss to the gunnery of Cpl J H Waller from the nose of FE.2b 6346 flown by 2Lt G R McCubbin on Sunday, 18th June 1916. Immelmann was flying the spare E.III 246/16 as his own E.IV had been badly shot up earlier that day.

Immelmanns Last Flight by Ivan Berryman.
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 A Gloster Gladiator MkII of 247 Sqn is depicted patrolling off the Cornish coast in August 1940 during which time this squadron became the only one to operate the Gladiator in the defence of the South of England during the Battle of Britain.

Lone Gladiator by Ivan Berryman. (P)
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 During the years of the German occupation of Holland in World War II, more than 20,000 Dutch civilians perished through starvation and lack of basic provisions. Operation Manna was set in motion on Sunday, 29th April 1945 when Lancasters of the Royal Air Force began the first of 2,835 sorties, dropping 6,672 tons of food, to relieve the crisis in the Netherlands.  These humanitarian missions continued until 8th May, saving many thousands of civilians from certain death by starvation and malnutrition.  Here, Lancaster 4K765, LS-Z of 15 Sqn piloted by Flying Officer Jack Darlow, releases its precious cargo over a sports field north of The Hague.  Also in the crew was Alistair Lamb the Rear Gunner.

Operation Manna by Ivan Berryman. (P)
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Hurricane LK-M of No.87 Squadron piloted by Flt Lt Alex Thom DFC limps over the south coast of England on 19th August 1942. While supporting troops on the ground at Dieppe, the Hurricane was hit by ground fire and lost oil pressure. Alex Thom got the damaged aircraft back to Britain, making a forced landing at East Den. Ferried back to 87 Sqn's airfield, he immediately set off once more for Dieppe in Hurricane LK-A.

A Welcome Shore by Ivan Berryman. (AP)
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Junker Ju87B-1s of 7 Staffel, Stg 77 swoop down to attack coastal targets. This opening phase of the Battle of Britain was to prove very costly for the Stuka squadrons as they found they could no longer operate unescorted against the RAF.

Stukas over England, South Coast, July 1940 by David Pentland.
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 Of similar configuration, but usually outclassed by its British contemporary, the Bristol F2b, the Luft-Verkehrs-Gesellschaft LVG was essentially a strong and stable observation aircraft that served widely during World War 1. On 21st May 1917, this example became the victim of the guns of Sergeant John H Jones, contributing to his eventual tally of 15 victories. Here, his pilot that day, Captain W G Mostyn, has already had a squirt using his forward-firing Vickers gun before manoeuvring their 22 Sqn machine into position for Jones to finish the job with his twin Lewis guns.

Sergeant John H Jones and pilot Captain W G Mostyn, Bristol F2b Fighter claiming a Luft-Verkehrs-Gesellschaft LVG by Ivan Berryman. (Y)
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NAVAL PRINTS

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Viewed across the damaged stern of the 80-gun San Nicholas, Nelson drives HMS Captain onto the Spanish vessel in order that she can be boarded and taken as a prize, the British marines and men scrambling up the Captains bowsprit to use it as a bridge. The San Nicholas then fouled the Spanish three decker San Joseph (112), allowing Nelson and his men to take both ships as prizes in a single manoeuvre. A British frigate is moving into a supporting position in the middle distance.

HMS Captain at the Battle of Cape St Vincent by Ivan Berryman (P)
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Originally constructed as a Home Fleet Repair Ship, HMS Cyclops was later converted into a submarine depot ship and enjoyed a long career, both in the Mediterranean and in home waters.  Here she prepares to receive HMS Sceptre.  Another S-class submarine is already tethered alongside.

HMS Cyclops Prepares to Receive HMS Sceptre by Ivan Berryman (AP)
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A class submarine, HMS Anchorite, swings away from the depot ship Adamant during work up exercises in the Firth of Clyde. In the mid fifties the depot ship was moored in Rothesay Bay providing a base for the 3rd Submarine Squadron. Leaving the moorings ahead of Anchorite is the frigate HMS Termagant which will day part in the days exercise.

Group Up- Half Ahead Starboard by Robert Barbour.
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B146.  HMS Jamaica by Ivan Berryman.

HMS Jamaica by Ivan Berryman.
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VAR346B.  H.M.A.S. Manoora 1940 by Brian Wood.
H.M.A.S. Manoora 1940 by Brian Wood (B)
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HMS Lion with her sister ship HMS Princess Royal are shown firing on the German High Seas Fleet which can be seen in the distance during the Battle of Jutland.

HMS Lion at the Battle of Jutland by Ivan Berryman (AP)
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 Depicted off Capetown with the distinctive skyline of Table Mountain providing the backdrop, the King George V class battleship HMS Howe and her destroyer escort began their journey home having visited New Zealand as well as South Africa following the end of hostilities in 1945.

HMS Howe by Ivan Berryman. (Y)
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Launched in January 1915, the Revenge-class battleship HMS Resolution was to enjoy a 33 year career during which she served in the Atlantic, home and Eastern Fleets as well as serving repeated spells in the Mediterranean, being both bombed and torpedoed along the way. She is depicted off Gibraltar with HMS Wolverine, the destroyer perhaps best remembered for destroying the U-47 which sunk Resolutions sister ship Royal Oak in Scapa Flow.

HMS Resolution at Gibraltar by Ivan Berryman (P)
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MILITARY PRINTS

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DHM499.  2nd Maryland Regiment at the Guildford Courthouse 1781 by Brian Palmer.

2nd Maryland Regiment at the Guildford Courthouse 1781 by Brian Palmer.
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 A German machine gun team defend against the British 3rd Corps attack on the high ground north of the Somme.  This was to be the start of the final Allied offensive of the war.

The Machine Guns - Battle of Amiens, France, 8th August 1918 by David Pentland. (P)
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 In an attempt to expand into Europe, Ottoman Turks under the command of Grand Vizier Kara Mustafa laid siege to Vienna for two months.  A coalition of Polish, German and Austrians led by John III Sobieski, the King of Poland, arrived before Vienna to raise the siege.  Sobieski led a charge of 20,000 cavalry, including the fearsome Winged Hussars into the Ottoman camp and completely routed their army. The battle was over in three hours, the Turks fled the field leaving behind tents, weapons, battle standards and provisions.  The threat to Europe had been reversed, and this battle signaled the beginning of the end for the Ottoman Empire.

Polish Winged Lancers - Battle of Vienna, September 12th 1683 by Brian Palmer.
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 Cavalry and Legionaries (plus Auxiliary Hamian Archer) of the XIVth Legion.

AD61 by Chris Collingwood. (Y)
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Captain Fields 2 Scimitar and 2 Scorpion light tanks of 3 Troop The Blues and Royals along with the Milan platoon, provide vital covering fire for 2 Paras assault on the North Spur Wireless Ridge (Apple Pie)  Following lessons learned at Goose Green additional support was available from artillery, mortars, machine guns and even HMS Ambuscade.  Despite the attack being conducted at night, with frequent snow flurries, and minefields, all the objectives were taken, and at first light the road to Port Stanley lay open and unopposed.

Battle for Wireless Ridge, Falklands, 13th June 1982 by David Pentland. (P)
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 Fought at Bouvines a village in Flanders (now part of France) Between the French army led by King Philip Augustus of France, against the combined forces of King John of England, The Holy Roman Emperor Otti IV, and Ferdinand Count of Flanders. Due to this French victory, Frederick of Hohenstaufen became Holy Roman Emperor Frederick II in 1215. and King John of England who could not wage war against France because of dwindling support was forced to sign the Magna Charter on June 15th 1215.

The Bataille de Bouvines 27th July 1214 by Horace Vernet. (Y)
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Stug Mk.III
Stug and Motorbike by Jason Askew. (P)
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Midday, 21st October 1805, and Admiral Collingwoods flagship, the 100-gun HMS Royal Sovereign, breaks the allied line and delivers a shattering broadside on the Spanish flagship Santa Anna. Making great speed, Collingwoods ship had breached the Franco-Spanish line some distance ahead of the rest of his van and the Royal Sovereign suffered heavily as she quickly drew the attentions of three French and three Spanish ships. To her starboard, the French Indomitable can be seen firing into the British flagship while, astern of the Santa Anna, Belleisle and Fougueux are engaging ahead of Mars, Monarca and Pluton.

The Battle of Trafalgar - The First Engagement by Ivan Berryman. (Y)
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SPORT PRINTS

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Champion racing horse West Tip at Cheltenham race course.

West Tip by Mark Churms.
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MC0042P. Tomahawk by Mark Churms.

Tomahawk by Mark Churms. (P)
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FAR635. Muirfield - 13th Hole by Mark Chadwick

Muirfield - 13th Hole by Mark Chadwick
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 England 53 - South Africa 3, Twickenham, Novermber 23rd 2002. England: Robinson, Cohen, Tindall, Greenwood, Christophers, Wilkinson, Dawson, Vickery, Leonard, Thompson, Johnson, Kay, Moody, Back, Hill. (Subs): Dallaglio, Gomersall, Healey, Morris, Regan, Stimpson. Scores: Try - Cohen, 2 Tries - Greenwood, Try - Back, Try - Hill, Try - Dallaglio, Penalty Try, 2 Penalties - Wilkinson, Conversion - Wilkinson, Conversion - Dawson, 2 Conversions - Gomersall, 2 Conversions - Stimpson. <br><br>South Africa: Greef, Paulse, Fleck, James, Lombard, Pretorius, Conradie, Roux, Dalton, Venter, Lambuschagne, Krige, Wannenburg, Van Niekerk. (Subs): Jacobs, Jordaan, Russell, Uys, Van Biljon, Van der Linde, Wentzel. Score : Penalty - Pretorius.

England v South Africa - Investec 2002 by Doug Harker. (Y)
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This montage shows Trigger winning the Goodwood Cup in 1995, 1997 and 1998.

Double Trigger by Stephen Smith.
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B40. Jean Alesi/ Benetton B.196

Jean Alesi/ Benetton B.196 by Ivan Berryman
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Epsom Trophy, Polo Championship

Epsom Trophy by Mark Churms.
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 A celebration of Nigel Mansells success in winning the Formula 1 World Championship and the Indy Car Championship in successive years. A celebration of the magnificent talents of Nigel Mansell. He made his debut in Formula 1 in 1981 and his superb driving technique made an instant impact. He recorded victory after victory coming agonisingly close to being world champion many times before gaining his well deserved Formula 1 title in 1992. The following year he recorded an unprecedented double, gaining the Indy Car championship in 1993. A feat that reserves his name quite rightly in the record books.
Mansell by Peter Deighan.
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