Home ] Up ] Acknowledgements ] How to use our site ]

HMS Centurion 

Home ] Up ] Vanguard Class ] HMS Victory ] HMS Revenge ] HMS St Vincent ] Duke of Wellington ] HMS Victoria ] [ HMS Centurion ] HMS London ] HMS Volage ] HMS Royal Sovereign ] Battle of the Nile ] Battle of Trafalgar ] HMS Impregnable ] HMS Lion ] Battle of Cape St Vincent ] HMS Defence ]

Choose the navy or section of interest below:

Royal Navy United States Germany France Japan Italy Russia Austria-Hungary
Canada Spain Netherlands Argentina Brazil Portugal Turkey Australia
Norway Sweden Denmark Belgium Chile Uruguay China New Zealand
Malta Greece India Poland South Africa Pakistan Libya Kuwait
Ireland Other Navies Liners   Unidentified Ships Wartime Naval Losses


Customer Helpline (UK) : 01436 820269
Subscribe to our Newsletter!

You currently have no items in your basket

Choose a FREE print if you spend over £220!
See Choice of Free Prints

Payment Options Display
Buy with confidence and security!
Publishing historical art since 1985

Google

 

Web

www.battleships-cruisers.co.uk

 

HMS Centurion, 60 gun ship of the line launched at Portsmouth in 1732 and commissioned in 1734. She served in the Home Fleet and took part in the expedition to Lisbon by Sir John Norris. In 1738 she was captained by George Anson and led a small squadron to the African coast then to Jamaica and back to England. In 1740 she started her famous circumnavigation being the only ship to survive the entire voyage and capturing the Spanish galleon Nuestra Senora de Cavadonga. After being cut down to a 50 gun ship she took part in the first battle of Finisterre.

 The fourth Centurion built and in 1740 she was the flagship of Commodore George Anson in a squadron of 7 ships who were brought up to complement by 500 superannuated and Chelsea out-pensioners, who all died during the voyage. They sailed on Anson's famous circumnavigation of the world in September 1740. They touched at Madeira and Port St Julian, and off Cape Horn in March 1741 the squadron were dispersed by a succession of gales. Scurvy broke out and the Centurion buried 43 men. She reached Juan Fernandez in June 1741 with 130 men on the sick list, besides having buried 200 men on the passage. Here a prize was captured, and the squadron set sail for the South American coast, capturing another prize on the way. They arrived in Payta Bay in November and surprised the town. Plunder to the value of £32,000 and other stores were taken; the town was set on fire and six vessels in the bay were sunk. In May 1742 the Commodore sailed for China. In August the Centurion anchored off one of the Ladrone Islands and landed 128 sick men, many of whom died. In November the ship arrived off Macao and wintered. In April 1743 Anson put to sea in an attempt to capture the large Spanish galleon trading between Acapulco and Manilla. On June 20th she was sighted off the Island of Samar, and proved to be the long-sought ship Nuestra Senora de Cavadonga. An action followed and lasted nearly two hours, at the end of which the Spaniard struck with a loss of 67 killed and 84 wounded. The Centurion lost only 2 killed and 17 wounded. The cargo of the prize included nearly one and a half million dollars, besides 36,000 ounces of silver and other merchandise. On July 10th the squadron reached Canton, and in December sold the prize at Macao. Numerous difficulties with the Chinese were experienced. In December 1743 the Centurion turned homewards, and reached Spithead on June 15th 1744. Thus ended Commodore George Anson's circumnavigation of the globe, a great naval exploring expedition with war-like objects, carried out with the greatest skill, patience and perseverance.

As the Admiralty declined to confirm Anson's first Lieutenant as captain, Anson returned his own commission as Rear-Admiral of the Blue, and went on half pay as a captain for six months. There is not a doubt that Anson was in the wrong. A change of Government taking place some ten months afterwards, Anson became a Lord of the Admiralty, and being promoted to Rear-Admiral of the White received two steps at once.

The figurehead of this centurion was a big lion some sixteen feet high. It was presented to the Duke of Richmond by King George III when the Centurion was broken up. While serving as an inn sign at Goodwood it was much admired by King William IV, who begged it from the Duke, and used it as a staircase ornament at Windsor Castle. The King later on presented it to Greenwich Hospital, with directions to place it in one of the wards, which he desired should be called the Anson Ward. It remained there until 1871 when it was removed to the playground of the Naval School, where owing to the action of the weather it unfortunately crumbled to pieces. At one time the following lines were inscribed beneath it:-

Stay, traveller, a while, and view

One who has travelled more than you;

Quite round the globe, thro' each degree,

Anson and I have ploughed the sea.

Torrid and frigid zones have pass'd

And-safe ashore arrived at last-

In ease with dignity appear,

He in the House of Lords-I here.

In 1746 the Centurion was cut down to a 50 gun ship. In 1747 the Centurion commanded by Captain Peter Denis, was in an English fleet of 17 ships under the command of Vice-Admiral George Anson, who flew his flag in Prince George. The French fleet, under Admiral de la Jonquiere, consisted of 14 men-of-war and a convoy of 24 ships, and was sighted on May 23rd about 70 miles from Cape Finisterre. The French made off and Anson chased. A running fight of 3 hours followed, in which 13 French ships were captured, while a small detached squadron captured six of the French convoy. Night saved the rest. A topical song of the time expresses in the following verses the part played by the Centurion:

The Centurion first led the van, (bis)

And held 'em till we came up;

Then we their hides did sorely bang,

Our broadsides we on them did pour, (bis)

We gave the French a sower drench,

And soon their topsails made them lower.

 

And when they saw our fleet come up, (bis)

They for quarters call'd without delay,

And their colours they that moment struck

O! how we did rejoice and sing, (bis)

To see such prizes we had took,

For ourselves and for George our King.

The French lost 700 killed and wounded, and the English 520, including one captain killed. Specie to the value of £300,000 was taken from the prizes. This victory was valuable if not brilliant. Vie-Admiral Anson was created a Peer and the captured men-of-war were all added to the British Navy.

In June 1751 the Centurion, flying the broad pennant of Commodore the Hon. Augustus Keppel, proceeded to Algiers, and smoothed over some difficulties with the Dey. The story goes that the Dey angrily expressed surprise that the King of Great Britain should have sent a beardless boy to treat with him. Keppel replied: "Had my master supposed that wisdom was measured by the length of the beard, he would have sent your Deyship a he-goat." After threatening Keppel with death, the Dey consented to treat.

In 1754, the Centurion, Captain the Hon. Augustus Keppel, in company with the Norwich, escorted to North America a large number of troops, destined to assist the colonials in the suppression of the Indians, who with France behind them as moral support, were rising against the English whites.

In 1759 the Centurion, commanded by Captain William Mantell, was in a fleet of 49 ships besides transports under Vice-Admiral Charles Saunders with his flag in Neptune. They left Spithead on February 17th and, having secured pilots by a ruse, they anchored a few miles below Quebec on June 26th with nearly 10,000 troops. On June 28th the French sent down seven fireships and two firerafts, but these were grappled and towed clear by the activity of the seamen. On September 13th under cover of the guns of the Centurion, the troops were landed and attacked Quebec. The seamen assisted with guns. On this day both General Wolfe and the Marquis of Montcalm, the English and French Commanders-in-Chief of the troops were mortally wounded. After some fighting the French retired. Additional ships were brought up to bombard, and on the 17th the enemy offered to surrender. On the 18th Vice-Admiral Saunders was one of the signatories to the surrender.

In May 1762 the Centurion, commanded by Captain James Galbraith, was in the English fleet proceeding to Havana against the Spaniards, which consisted of 53 ships, besides storeships, hospital ships and transports, with 15,000 troops. Admiral Sir George Pocock, with his flag in Namur, and George, Earl of Albemarle, were the naval and military Commanders-in-Chief. On May 27th the fleet of 200 sail in all stood away for the Old Strait of Bahama, which was safely navigated by marking the dangerous shoals and reefs with boats. During the passage two Spanish ships were captured. On June 6th the fleet arrived off Havana, and while a feint was made elsewhere the troops were landed under cover of the guns of the fleet. Moro was bombarded, although the Spaniards made a most gallant defence, Havana fell, and the British took complete possession on August 14th 1762. Specie and stores to the value of three million pounds were captured; thirteen Spanish men-of-war were destroyed, three were sunk, and two on the stocks were burned. While on the passage to Havana some ships were detached and captured two ships in the harbour of Mariel. The British lost 1790 killed and wounded. The division of the prize money caused some heartburning. It worked out as follows: Admiral £123,000, captain £1600, petty officer £17, seaman or marine £4.

In 1769 the Centurion was broken up at Chatham.

 

Valuations

Classified Ads Terms and Conditions Shipping Info Contact Details

 

 

Click here to go to our naval history forum

 

AVIATION PRINTS

Click above to see all of our aviation art index - Eight random half price aviation items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Aviation Art Offers

 During a patrol on 6th July 1918, Christiansen spotted a British submarine on the surface of the Thames Estuary. He immediately turned and put his Hansa-Brandenburg W.29 floatplane into an attacking dive, raking the submarine C.25 with machine gun fire, killing the captain and five other crewmen. This victory was added to his personal tally, bringing his score to 13 kills by the end of the war, even though the submarine managed to limp back to safety. Christiansen survived the war and went on to work as a pilot for the Dornier company, notably flying the giant Dornier Do.X on its inaugural flight to New York in 1930. He died in 1972, aged 93.

Kapitanleutnant zur See Friedrich Christiansen by Ivan Berryman. (Y)
Half Price! - £37.50
 Hurricane Mk.IIC Z3971 of 253 Sqn, closing on a Heinkel 111.

Hurricane Mk.IIC by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £45.00
 Depicting the No.19 Sqn Spitfire Mk.IIA of Flt Lt Walter Lawson attacking a a Bf.109 E-4 of JG.3 in the Summer of 1940. The final tally of Lawson before he was listed as missing in August 1941 was 6 confirmed, 1 shared, 3 probables and 1 damaged.  The Bf.109 shown here was flown by Oberleutnant Franz von Werra. He survived this encounter, but was shot down over Kent in September 1940.

Flt Lt Walter Lawson by Ivan Berryman. (B)
Half Price! - £75.00
 Erich Lowenhardt was already the holder of the Knights Cross 1st and 2nd Class for acts of bravery even before becoming a pilot. After serving as an observer for a year, he was eventually posted to Jasta 10 in 1917 where he immediately began to score victories, sending down balloons and enemy aircraft at a fearsome rate. He was appointed Commander of Jasta 10 one week before his 21st birthday, making him one the youngest pilots to rise to such a rank in the German Army Air Service. He continued to increase his score steadily throughout 1917 and 1918, but was involved in a mid-air collision with a Jasta 11 aircraft on 10th August. Lowenhardt elected to abandon his aircraft, but his parachute failed to deploy and the young ace fell to his death. He flew a number of aircraft, but this yellow-fuselaged Fokker D.VII was his most distinctive and is believed to be the aircraft in which he was killed. His final victory total was 54.

Oberleutnant Erich Lowenhardt by Ivan Berryman. (AP)
Half Price! - £140.00

 Wing Commander J R Baldwin is depicted flying Typhoon MN934 whilst commanding 146 Wing, 84 Group operating from Needs Oar Point in 1944, en route to a bombing raid on 20th June with other Typhoons of 257 Sqn in which both ends of a railway tunnel full of German supplies were successfully sealed.

Typhoons Over Normandy by Ivan Berryman. (AP)
Half Price! - £90.00
Depicting Dauntless and Devastator attacking the Japanese aircraft carrier Akagi during the Battle of Midway.

Midway - The Setting Sun by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £55.00
 Regarded by some in the Air Ministry as a failed fighter, the mighty Hawker Typhoon was unrivalled as a ground attack aircraft, especially in the crucial months immediately prior to – and after – D-Day when squadrons of Typhoons operated in 'cab ranks' to smash the German infrastructure and smooth the passage of the invading allied force.  This aircraft is Mk.1B (MN570) of Wing Commander R E P Brooker of 123 Wing based at Thorney Island.

Sledgehammer by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £75.00
 Focke-Wulf FW.190A-5/U8 of 1 Gruppe, Schnellkampfgeschwader 10 in 1943. All national markings were painted out, except for the call sign C on the fuselage and repeated, crudely sprayed, on the engine cowling.

Focke-Wulf Fw190A-5/U8 by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - £500.00

 

NAVAL PRINTS

Click above to see all of our naval art index - Eight random half price naval items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Naval Art Offers

HMS Lion with her sister ship HMS Princess Royal are shown firing on the German High Seas Fleet which can be seen in the distance during the Battle of Jutland.

HMS Lion at the Battle of Jutland by Ivan Berryman (AP)
Half Price! - £95.00
 Viewed from beneath the blistered guns of the damaged X and Y turrets of her sister HMS Ajax, Achilles come sunder fire from the pocket battleship Admiral Graf Spee during what was to become known as the Battle of the River Plate on the 13th December 1939. Shells from Achilles are closing on her opponent as the Graf Spee alters course at the start of the doomed battleships flight to Montevideo

The Pursuit of the Graf Spee by Ivan Berryman (P)
Half Price! - £2800.00
The Pedestal Convoy of August 1942 was one of the most heavily protected convoys in the history of sea warfare.  Fourteen of the fastest cargo ships of the time were protected by 4 carriers, 2 battleships, 7 cruisers and 32 destroyers.  The destroyer HMS Ashanti is in the foreground of the painting.  Also depicted are the carrier HMS Indomitable, with her Hurricanes cirling the convoy overhead, and the cargoe ship Port Chalmers to the right of the picture.

Pedestal Convoy by Anthony Saunders (B)
Half Price! - £20.00
A class submarine, HMS Anchorite, swings away from the depot ship Adamant during work up exercises in the Firth of Clyde. In the mid fifties the depot ship was moored in Rothesay Bay providing a base for the 3rd Submarine Squadron. Leaving the moorings ahead of Anchorite is the frigate HMS Termagant which will day part in the days exercise.

Group Up- Half Ahead Starboard by Robert Barbour.
Half Price! - £30.00

Ships of the Falklands Task Force formate following the Argentine surrender in 1982.  Nearest is Leander class frigate HMS Andromeda with RFA Brambleleaf in her wake.  The Type 22 frigate HMS Brilliant is to the left of the picture, with the carrier HMS Invincible dominating the right.  HMS Hermes and her escorts are in the extreme distance.

Victory Parade by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - £2900.00
 With her pennant number GO4 painted out to accommodate a western approaches camouflage the destroyer HMS Onslaught punches her way through a heavy swell during escort duties in the north Atlantic

HMS Onslaught by Ivan Berryman (AP)
Half Price! - £75.00
 USS Forrestal in preparation to launch an F14 Tomcat while in the Mediterranean , 1991, on her 21st and final operational deployment.

USS Forrestal by Ivan Berryman. (Y)
Half Price! - £50.00
B61AP.  USS Oakland Escorting the Damaged USS Lexington by Ivan Berryman.
USS Oakland Escorting the Damaged USS Lexington by Ivan Berryman (AP)
Half Price! - £30.00

 

MILITARY PRINTS

Click above to see all of our military art index - Eight random half price military items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Military Art Offers

 British infantry supported by Warrior armoured vehicles advance into Iraq, February 1991.

The Storm and the Sabre by Simon Smith.
Half Price! - £50.00
Charles Edward Stuart on Board a French Warship bound for France, takes his last look at Scotland disappearing from view and reflects over the events of the previous year and what might have been.
The End of the Jacobite Dream by Brian Wood.
Half Price! - £90.00
<b>Ex-display prints in near perfect condition. </b>

King Henry V at the Battle of Agincourt by Sir John Gilbert. (Y)
Half Price! - £25.00
Depicting Colonel Hugh Halkett and the German Landwehr battalion Osnabruck capturing General Cambronne.

The Capture of General Cambronne by Richard Knotel.
Half Price! - £20.00

The decisive battle of the War of the Roses was fought near Market Bosworth. Richard of Gloucester, the last Plantagenate King of England was to try consequences with Henry Tudor, Earl of Richmond. The bloody conflict began in the traditional manner with the opposing armies drawn up in line. facing one another, except for the forces of Thomas Neville, Lord Stanley, as yeyt uncommitted to either side. King Richard, the Third of that name, is seated astride his grey charger in his fine blued harness. He is accompanied by his personal standard and the royal standard, alongside that of Lord Zouch to his right. His herald, trumpet are at his side. To his left Richards Chamberlain and Admiral, Viscount Lord Lovel, sits ready, astride his mount. To the rear we see the rest of the household and choice force of cavalry, kept out of shot to avoid unnecessary casualties amongst the expensive war horses.  After the opening deadly arrow storm, boys hurriedly collect fallen arrows for Richards men to shoot back. In the front line crossbowmen return fire from behind the safety of their decorated pavaises (painted with the suns and white roses of York and the white boar, Richards badge). Close by a gentleman at arms, mortally wounded by an iron ball fired from a hand gonne is dragged from the field by his page. Sir Walter Devereux (Lord Ferrers) accompanied by his standard is encouraging his household (soldiers wearing his livery colours ) to attack.  However, there is a marked reluctance on both sides to join the vicious close quarter combat of handstrokes and only in the centre is there any heavy fighting. Richard is informed by his herald that Henry and his household have been recognised and are now within charge distance. Faced with his armies reluctance to come to grips with the enemy, he decides to force battle himself by leading his own household, the Choice Force, in a desperate charge against Henry seeking to engage him in single combat.  Characteristically leading from the front Richard slays many a knight, including William Brandon (Henrys standard bearer) in his vain attempt to kill his rival. At this crucial moment Lord Stanley decides to join Henrys cause, attacks the choice force and drives it from the field. In the brutal hand to hand fighting the king is unhorsed and though surrounded, fights to the end.  -KingRichard alone was killed fighting manfully in the thickest press of his enemies - his courage was high and fierce and failed him not even at the death which when his men forsook him, he preferred to take by the sword, rather than by foul flight to prolong his life- (Polydore Virgil)

Richard III at the Battle of Bosworth, 22nd August 1485 by Mark Churms. (P)
Half Price! - £4000.00
VAR461.  Royal Artillery 10in Howitzers by Campion.

Royal Artillery 10in Howitzers by Campion.
Half Price! - £20.00
 Bastogne, Ardennes, Belgium, 20th December 1944.  Newly arrived 81mm Mortars of 2nd Battalion, 506th PIR, 101st Airborne Division, fire in support of U.S. Paratroopers defending against German probes to the north of Bastogne.

Fire for Effect by David Pentland. (AP)
Half Price! - £95.00
DHM1601P. Ride Like the Devil - the Charge of the 13th Light Dragoons at the Battle of Vittoria by Chris Collingwood.

Ride Like the Devil - the Charge of the 13th Light Dragoons at the Battle of Vittoria by Chris Collingwood. (P)
Half Price! - £4250.00

 

SPORT PRINTS

Click above to see all of our sport art index - Eight random half price sport items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Sport Art Offers

 Ralf Schumacher winning the first Grand Prix of his career in the Williams FW23. Ralf dominated the San Marino Grand Prix from the first corner to the chequered flag giving Williams its first win since 1997. History was made when the Schumachers became the first brothers in Formula 1 to win a Grand Prix. Imola April 2001.

The Italian Job by Michael Thompson
Half Price! - £75.00
 Elf Tyrrell Ford 006.  World Champion 1973.
Jackie Stewart by Michael Thompson.
Half Price! - £25.00
B40. Jean Alesi/ Benetton B.196

Jean Alesi/ Benetton B.196 by Ivan Berryman
Half Price! - £40.00

Beckhams Golden Generation by Darren Baker. (Y)
Half Price! - £75.00

 Carl Fogarty testing the new Foggy Petronas FP1 at Brands Hatch, 2003.
Back on Track by Dave Foord. (Y)
Half Price! - £110.00
 Valentino Rossi at speed on his Repsol Honda.
Rossi at Speed by Derrick Mark.
Half Price! - £25.00
 Michael Schumacher and Ferrari.
Encore by Graham Bosworth
Half Price! - £24.00
Matt Le Tissier is quite simply a legend of Southampton Football Club. Since making his debut in 1986, Matt played 462 games for the Saints scoring 209 goals (including 49 penalties out of 50!)

Matt le Tissier by Gary Brandham. (Y)
Half Price! - £60.00

Everything we obtain for this site is shown on the site, we do not have any more photos, crew lists or further information on any of the ships.

COPYRIGHT NOTICE. ALL IMAGES DISPLAYED ON THIS WEBSITE ARE PROTECTED BY  COPYRIGHT  LAW, AND ARE OWNED BY CRANSTON FINE ARTS OR THEIR RESPECTIVE OWNERS.  NO REPRODUCTION OR COPYING ALLOWED ON OTHER WEBSITES, BOOKS OR ARTICLES WITHOUT PRIOR AGREEMENT.

This website is owned by Cranston Fine Arts.  Torwood House, Torwoodhill Road, Rhu, Helensburgh, Scotland, G848LE

Contact: Tel: (+44) (0) 1436 820269.  Fax: (+44) (0) 1436 820473. Email:

Return to Home Page