Home ] Up ] Acknowledgements ] How to use our site ]

HMS Centurion 

Home ] Up ] Vanguard Class ] HMS Victory ] HMS Revenge ] HMS St Vincent ] Duke of Wellington ] HMS Victoria ] [ HMS Centurion ] HMS London ] HMS Volage ] HMS Royal Sovereign ] Battle of the Nile ] Battle of Trafalgar ] HMS Impregnable ] HMS Lion ] Battle of Cape St Vincent ] HMS Defence ]

Choose the navy or section of interest below:

Royal Navy United States Germany France Japan Italy Russia Austria-Hungary
Canada Spain Netherlands Argentina Brazil Portugal Turkey Australia
Norway Sweden Denmark Belgium Chile Uruguay China New Zealand
Malta Greece India Poland South Africa Pakistan Libya Kuwait
Ireland Other Navies Liners   Unidentified Ships Wartime Naval Losses


Customer Helpline (UK) : 01436 820269
Subscribe to our Newsletter!

You currently have no items in your basket

Choose a FREE print if you spend over £220!
See Choice of Free Prints

Payment Options Display
Buy with confidence and security!
Publishing historical art since 1985

Google

 

Web

www.battleships-cruisers.co.uk

 

HMS Centurion, 60 gun ship of the line launched at Portsmouth in 1732 and commissioned in 1734. She served in the Home Fleet and took part in the expedition to Lisbon by Sir John Norris. In 1738 she was captained by George Anson and led a small squadron to the African coast then to Jamaica and back to England. In 1740 she started her famous circumnavigation being the only ship to survive the entire voyage and capturing the Spanish galleon Nuestra Senora de Cavadonga. After being cut down to a 50 gun ship she took part in the first battle of Finisterre.

 The fourth Centurion built and in 1740 she was the flagship of Commodore George Anson in a squadron of 7 ships who were brought up to complement by 500 superannuated and Chelsea out-pensioners, who all died during the voyage. They sailed on Anson's famous circumnavigation of the world in September 1740. They touched at Madeira and Port St Julian, and off Cape Horn in March 1741 the squadron were dispersed by a succession of gales. Scurvy broke out and the Centurion buried 43 men. She reached Juan Fernandez in June 1741 with 130 men on the sick list, besides having buried 200 men on the passage. Here a prize was captured, and the squadron set sail for the South American coast, capturing another prize on the way. They arrived in Payta Bay in November and surprised the town. Plunder to the value of £32,000 and other stores were taken; the town was set on fire and six vessels in the bay were sunk. In May 1742 the Commodore sailed for China. In August the Centurion anchored off one of the Ladrone Islands and landed 128 sick men, many of whom died. In November the ship arrived off Macao and wintered. In April 1743 Anson put to sea in an attempt to capture the large Spanish galleon trading between Acapulco and Manilla. On June 20th she was sighted off the Island of Samar, and proved to be the long-sought ship Nuestra Senora de Cavadonga. An action followed and lasted nearly two hours, at the end of which the Spaniard struck with a loss of 67 killed and 84 wounded. The Centurion lost only 2 killed and 17 wounded. The cargo of the prize included nearly one and a half million dollars, besides 36,000 ounces of silver and other merchandise. On July 10th the squadron reached Canton, and in December sold the prize at Macao. Numerous difficulties with the Chinese were experienced. In December 1743 the Centurion turned homewards, and reached Spithead on June 15th 1744. Thus ended Commodore George Anson's circumnavigation of the globe, a great naval exploring expedition with war-like objects, carried out with the greatest skill, patience and perseverance.

As the Admiralty declined to confirm Anson's first Lieutenant as captain, Anson returned his own commission as Rear-Admiral of the Blue, and went on half pay as a captain for six months. There is not a doubt that Anson was in the wrong. A change of Government taking place some ten months afterwards, Anson became a Lord of the Admiralty, and being promoted to Rear-Admiral of the White received two steps at once.

The figurehead of this centurion was a big lion some sixteen feet high. It was presented to the Duke of Richmond by King George III when the Centurion was broken up. While serving as an inn sign at Goodwood it was much admired by King William IV, who begged it from the Duke, and used it as a staircase ornament at Windsor Castle. The King later on presented it to Greenwich Hospital, with directions to place it in one of the wards, which he desired should be called the Anson Ward. It remained there until 1871 when it was removed to the playground of the Naval School, where owing to the action of the weather it unfortunately crumbled to pieces. At one time the following lines were inscribed beneath it:-

Stay, traveller, a while, and view

One who has travelled more than you;

Quite round the globe, thro' each degree,

Anson and I have ploughed the sea.

Torrid and frigid zones have pass'd

And-safe ashore arrived at last-

In ease with dignity appear,

He in the House of Lords-I here.

In 1746 the Centurion was cut down to a 50 gun ship. In 1747 the Centurion commanded by Captain Peter Denis, was in an English fleet of 17 ships under the command of Vice-Admiral George Anson, who flew his flag in Prince George. The French fleet, under Admiral de la Jonquiere, consisted of 14 men-of-war and a convoy of 24 ships, and was sighted on May 23rd about 70 miles from Cape Finisterre. The French made off and Anson chased. A running fight of 3 hours followed, in which 13 French ships were captured, while a small detached squadron captured six of the French convoy. Night saved the rest. A topical song of the time expresses in the following verses the part played by the Centurion:

The Centurion first led the van, (bis)

And held 'em till we came up;

Then we their hides did sorely bang,

Our broadsides we on them did pour, (bis)

We gave the French a sower drench,

And soon their topsails made them lower.

 

And when they saw our fleet come up, (bis)

They for quarters call'd without delay,

And their colours they that moment struck

O! how we did rejoice and sing, (bis)

To see such prizes we had took,

For ourselves and for George our King.

The French lost 700 killed and wounded, and the English 520, including one captain killed. Specie to the value of £300,000 was taken from the prizes. This victory was valuable if not brilliant. Vie-Admiral Anson was created a Peer and the captured men-of-war were all added to the British Navy.

In June 1751 the Centurion, flying the broad pennant of Commodore the Hon. Augustus Keppel, proceeded to Algiers, and smoothed over some difficulties with the Dey. The story goes that the Dey angrily expressed surprise that the King of Great Britain should have sent a beardless boy to treat with him. Keppel replied: "Had my master supposed that wisdom was measured by the length of the beard, he would have sent your Deyship a he-goat." After threatening Keppel with death, the Dey consented to treat.

In 1754, the Centurion, Captain the Hon. Augustus Keppel, in company with the Norwich, escorted to North America a large number of troops, destined to assist the colonials in the suppression of the Indians, who with France behind them as moral support, were rising against the English whites.

In 1759 the Centurion, commanded by Captain William Mantell, was in a fleet of 49 ships besides transports under Vice-Admiral Charles Saunders with his flag in Neptune. They left Spithead on February 17th and, having secured pilots by a ruse, they anchored a few miles below Quebec on June 26th with nearly 10,000 troops. On June 28th the French sent down seven fireships and two firerafts, but these were grappled and towed clear by the activity of the seamen. On September 13th under cover of the guns of the Centurion, the troops were landed and attacked Quebec. The seamen assisted with guns. On this day both General Wolfe and the Marquis of Montcalm, the English and French Commanders-in-Chief of the troops were mortally wounded. After some fighting the French retired. Additional ships were brought up to bombard, and on the 17th the enemy offered to surrender. On the 18th Vice-Admiral Saunders was one of the signatories to the surrender.

In May 1762 the Centurion, commanded by Captain James Galbraith, was in the English fleet proceeding to Havana against the Spaniards, which consisted of 53 ships, besides storeships, hospital ships and transports, with 15,000 troops. Admiral Sir George Pocock, with his flag in Namur, and George, Earl of Albemarle, were the naval and military Commanders-in-Chief. On May 27th the fleet of 200 sail in all stood away for the Old Strait of Bahama, which was safely navigated by marking the dangerous shoals and reefs with boats. During the passage two Spanish ships were captured. On June 6th the fleet arrived off Havana, and while a feint was made elsewhere the troops were landed under cover of the guns of the fleet. Moro was bombarded, although the Spaniards made a most gallant defence, Havana fell, and the British took complete possession on August 14th 1762. Specie and stores to the value of three million pounds were captured; thirteen Spanish men-of-war were destroyed, three were sunk, and two on the stocks were burned. While on the passage to Havana some ships were detached and captured two ships in the harbour of Mariel. The British lost 1790 killed and wounded. The division of the prize money caused some heartburning. It worked out as follows: Admiral £123,000, captain £1600, petty officer £17, seaman or marine £4.

In 1769 the Centurion was broken up at Chatham.

 

Valuations

Classified Ads Terms and Conditions Shipping Info Contact Details

 

 

Click here to go to our naval history forum

 

AVIATION PRINTS

Click above to see all of our aviation art index - Eight random half price aviation items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Aviation Art Offers

 Rittmeister Karl Bolle Commander Jasta 2 early 1918.

Alone in a Winter Sky - Fokker Triplane DR1 by David Pentland. (P)
Half Price! - £600.00
The last purely British fighter aircraft to be used by the Royal Air Force, the Lightning offered a truly massive performance advantage over existing equipment when it was introduced into squadron service in 1960, achieving level flight speed of around, 1400mph. The prototype known as the P1 had flown in 1954 but production aircraft were not available until 1959, a long gestation period but perhaps understandable with such an advanced machine with many untried, new features. The painting shows an F1A of 111 squadron taking off from its base at Wattisham. The remarque drawing shows an aircraft of 56 squadron Firebirds in 1963 when they were the official RAF aerobatics team for that year. 337 Lightnings were produced, serving with nine squadrons of the Royal Air Force before being supersede by the Phantom and Tornado.
BAC Lightning by Keith Woodcock.
Half Price! - £20.00
 A pair of De Havilland Mosquito NF. MkII night fighters of 23 Squadron, based at Bradwell Bay, Essex in 1942.

Night Raiders by Ivan Berryman. (Y)
Half Price! - £52.50
 With a final 47 victories to his credit, Robert Alexander Little was one of the highest-scoring British aces of World War 1, beginning his career with the famous No 8 (Naval) Squadron in 1916, flying Sopwith Pup N5182, as shown here. On 21st April 1917, he was attacked and shot down by six aircraft of Jasta Boelke, Little being thrown from the cockpit of his Sopwith Camel on impact with the ground. As the German aircraft swooped in to rake the wreckage with machine gun fire, Little pulled his Webley from its holster and began returning fire before being assisted by British infantry with their Lewis guns. Such was the character of this great pilot who finally met his death whilst attacking Gotha bombers on the night of 27th May 1918.

Captain Robert Little by Ivan Berryman. (GL)
Half Price! - £350.00

  Eight minutes after the gliders had touched down at LZ-Z the first of the paratroops started to arrive at 1353.  Thirty six C47s over DZ-X dropped the 1st Battalion Parachute Regiment at 1403.  On the ground are the discarded chutes of the 2nd Battalion dropped ten minutes earlier.  In the middle distance can be seen the blue smoke used to identify DZ-X, left by the 21st Independent Para Company.  Dropped by the 14 and 59 Sqn/ 61 Troop Carrier Group which had taken off from Barkston Heath, Lincolnshire, the 2nd and 3rd Para Battalions, which dropped slightly earlier had enplaned at Saltby airfield.  Between 1353 and 1408 2276 paratroops jumped at an altitude of between 700 to 900ft..

Arnhem - September 17th 1944 by Graeme Lothian (P)
Half Price! - £1800.00
 Jaguar GR3A from 41 (Fighter) Squadron based at RAF Coltishall and flown by Squadron Leader Ian Smith thunders down a Norwegian fjord.  Coltishall Jaguars regularly deploy on exercise in northern Norway as part of NATO's protection of its northern flank.  However, Spring of 2006 saw the closure of RAF Coltishall, the loss of an historic airfield.

Snowcat by Robert Tomlin. (Y)
Half Price! - £35.00
 A Mosquito Mk.BIX above the clouds in late 1943.  Mosquito B.IX LR503 holds the record for the most combat missions flown by a single Allied bomber in the Second World War, serving 213 sorties.

A De Havilland Beauty by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £95.00
 Wing Commander Roland Beamont in his personal Tempest V, intercepted and downed his first V1 Buzzbomb on the night of June 22nd, 1944, over south east England. As Commander of 150 wing and others he went on to shoot down a total of 30 V1 flying bombs, 8 enemy aircraft and 35 locomotives destroyed plus one minesweeper sunk.
A Buzz for Beamont by David Pentland. (Y)
Half Price! - £35.00

 

NAVAL PRINTS

Click above to see all of our naval art index - Eight random half price naval items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Naval Art Offers

B65.  HMS King George V by Ivan Berryman.

HMS King George V by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £15.00
The moment shortly after dawn on 24th May 1941 when HMS Hood, in company with HMS Prince of Wales, opens fire on the Bismarck, setting in motion one of the greatest sea dramas the world had seen.

HMS Hood Engages Bismarck by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £15.00
The cruiser HMS Frobisher dominates this scene off Houlgate at the Normandy landings of 1944.  The monitor HMS Roberts lies beyond Frobisher with a Large Infantry Landing Ship or LSI (L) unshipping its LCAs on the extreme right of the picture.  In the foreground, a motor launch attends a group of LCP (L)s as they head for the French beaches.  Two Spitfire Mk.IXs conduct sweeps overhead as Operation Neptune gathers momentum.

HMS Frobisher and HMS Roberts at Normandy by Ivan Berryman (P)
Half Price! - £4000.00
RFA Fort Austin makes a leisurely rendezvous at sunset with the Polaris submarine HMS Renown on patrol somewhere in mid ocean. Soon a rubber inflatable will be launched from the Fort, and mail and fresh fruit and vegetables will be transferred before darkness sets in and makes the operation more hazardous.

The Rendezvous by Robert Barbour.
Half Price! - £30.00

The pride of the British fleet, The Mighty Hood as she was known, was launched in 1918.  Weighing in at over 40,000 tons she was 860 feet long and had eight 15 inch guns, at her launch she was more than a match for any adversary.  Hood sailed the world in the inter-war years and was admired in every foreign port she visited, however with a lack of major refits in this time the second world war found the Hood unprepared for a major battle,  On the 24th of May 1941 the German battleship Bismarck found Hoods achilles heel within only a few salvos, namely her inadequate deck armour.  Hood exploded in a huge fireball from which only three sailors survived.  Here HMS Hood is seen with Force H in the Mediterranean.  Winston Churchill knew that the powerful French fleet at Mers-el-Kebir could fall into German hands at any time and that the threat had to be removed by any means.  On the 3rd of July 1940 the French fleet was duly dispatched by Force H.  The Strasbourg being the only French battleship able to make her escape.  Hodd is depicted opening fire at 17.55 hours with the battleships Resolution and the destroyer HMS Foxhound to her stern.

HMS Hood - Operation Catapult by Anthony Saunders (P)
Half Price! - £3200.00
 Launched on Trafalgar Day, 1960, HMS Dreadnought was the Royal Navy's first nuclear powered submarine, entering service in 1963.  She is depicted here in the Firth of Forth with the iconic Forth Bridge in the background in December 1963 when she was docked at Rosyth for re-coating of her hull and a general examination.

HMS Dreadnought S101 by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - £700.00
 The Japanese ship Takao at Flank speed, riding shotgun for the carrier

Flank Speed by Randall Wilson.
Half Price! - £35.00
 With her pennant number GO4 painted out to accommodate a western approaches camouflage the destroyer HMS Onslaught punches her way through a heavy swell during escort duties in the north Atlantic

HMS Onslaught by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £50.00

 

MILITARY PRINTS

Click above to see all of our military art index - Eight random half price military items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Military Art Offers

The Battle of Barnet was fought in a heavy mist, on Easter Sunday 14th April 1471. Due to a misalignment of the opposing armies, all became confusion. The centre of the battle (as depicted here) was fought at close quarters, a mass of struggling knights and men at arms with comrade fighting comrade, their vision of the battle obscured by mist. The Yorkists under the leadership of King Edward IV triumphed, leaving the Lancastrians with hopes dashed. Their champion and leader, the great Richard Neville, Earl of Warwick The King Maker lay dead, cut down while struggling to regain his charger. In the painting Edward IV charges toward the banner of Henry Holland, Duke of Exeter, while in the foreground soldiers of the Houses of York and Lancaster hack and slash at each other in terrified butchery.

Battle of Barnet by Chris Collingwood.
Half Price! - £90.00
 Normandy, Mid-June 1944.  A REME Leyland Retriever mobile workshop truck and M7 Priest SP gun of 33rd Field Regiment, Royal Artillery, 3rd Infantry Division, disembark from an LST at one of the <i>Whale</i> floating roadways that made up the British Mulberry B harbour at Arromanches.

Arromanches by David Pentland. (P)
Half Price! - £700.00
 The picture shows a despatch rider coming under fire from Boer Marksmen. The picture is also known as A Yeomanry Scout Galloping With Despatches in the Boer War.

Within Sound of the Guns by Lady Elizabeth Butler. (Y)
Half Price! - £25.00
 The Mark IV Tank of Lt. F. MItchell MC, 1st battalion Tank Corps engages A7V tanks at Villers-Bretonneux, 24th April 1918.

The First Tank versus Tank Action by David Rowlands. (GL)
Half Price! - £280.00

 In 1275 BC there were two superpowers in the ancient near east, in the south the Egyptians and in the north the Hittites from Anatolia in modern day central Turkey.  A clash between these two powers was inevitable.  The Egyptian Pharaoh Rameses II marched an army north into Syria to confront the Hittites and their allies under King Muwatallis.  Reaching Kadesh Rameses camped under the walls of the city with his leading division, Amun, and awaited the arrival of the rest of his army.  Poor intelligence had led Rameses to believe the Hittites were far to the north, in fact they were only 2 - 3 miles away.  Muwatallis delivered a surprise attack against Rameses camp but the Egyptians managed to hold on until re-enforcements arrived.  Despite retreating from the field after a day long battle it was Rameses who claimed a victory.  The two armies never clashed again and eventually a peace treaty was signed between the Egyptians and the Hittites.

The Battle of Kadesh - circa 127 BC by Brian Palmer (P)
Half Price! - £1650.00
VAR458.  Capturing of the French Eagle by Sgt Ewart by Orlando Norie.

Capturing of the French Eagle by Sgt Ewart by Orlando Norie.
Half Price! - £20.00
 Second in the series of British Army units in Northern Ireland.

Deployment from Palace Barracks by David Pentland.
Half Price! - £35.00
 Northern France, 22nd May 1940.  Sdkfz 222 light armoured cars of the SS Leibstandarte Regiment drive along French lanes on a reconnaissance patrol for the forces of General Heinz Guderian on their advance towards the French coast.

Eyes of the Army by David Pentland. (P)
Half Price! - £700.00

 

SPORT PRINTS

Click above to see all of our sport art index - Eight random half price sport items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Sport Art Offers



Heroes of Goodison Park by Doug Harker. (Y)
Half Price! - £165.00
Celebrating Sir Alexs magnificent orchestration of Manchester Uniteds historic treble cup success of 1999.

Sir Alex Ferguson by Darren Baker.
Half Price! - £50.00
 Colin Edwards gave Honda racing another victory with an inspired performance during the last race of the season to put rival Troy Bayliss into second place. Bobs painting depicts the typically-aggressive cornering style of the Texas Tornado in his winning leathers as he threw the mighty Honda around the Imola racing circuit.

Down to the Wire by Robert Tomlin.
Half Price! - £60.00
 Valentino Rossi at speed on his Repsol Honda.
Rossi at Speed by Derrick Mark.
Half Price! - £25.00

 A celebration of Nigel Mansells success in winning the Formula 1 World Championship and the Indy Car Championship in successive years. A celebration of the magnificent talents of Nigel Mansell. He made his debut in Formula 1 in 1981 and his superb driving technique made an instant impact. He recorded victory after victory coming agonisingly close to being world champion many times before gaining his well deserved Formula 1 title in 1992. The following year he recorded an unprecedented double, gaining the Indy Car championship in 1993. A feat that reserves his name quite rightly in the record books.
Mansell by Peter Deighan.
Half Price! - £45.00
FAR635. Muirfield - 13th Hole by Mark Chadwick

Muirfield - 13th Hole by Mark Chadwick
Half Price! - £20.00
B42. Gerhard Berger/ Ferrari 412.T2 by Ivan Berryman.

Gerhard Berger/ Ferrari 412.T2 by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £40.00
DB006. Michael Schumacher by Darren Baker.
Michael Schumacher by Darren Baker.
Half Price! - £75.00

Everything we obtain for this site is shown on the site, we do not have any more photos, crew lists or further information on any of the ships.

COPYRIGHT NOTICE. ALL IMAGES DISPLAYED ON THIS WEBSITE ARE PROTECTED BY  COPYRIGHT  LAW, AND ARE OWNED BY CRANSTON FINE ARTS OR THEIR RESPECTIVE OWNERS.  NO REPRODUCTION OR COPYING ALLOWED ON OTHER WEBSITES, BOOKS OR ARTICLES WITHOUT PRIOR AGREEMENT.

This website is owned by Cranston Fine Arts.  Torwood House, Torwoodhill Road, Rhu, Helensburgh, Scotland, G848LE

Contact: Tel: (+44) (0) 1436 820269.  Fax: (+44) (0) 1436 820473. Email:

Return to Home Page