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HMS London two decker wooden converted screw ship of the line designed by Sir William Symonds and launched 1840. She took part in the bombardment of Fort Constantine at Sevastopol 1854 during the Crimean War but sustained damage. She was turned into a hulk at Zanzibar in 1884.

Previous HMS London. Built at Shish Deptford Dockyard but badly damaged by the Dutch and rebuilt in 1706.

The London - Two Decker Wooden Converted Screw Ship of the Line photograph from W A Bieber.

HMS London in Zanzibar.  Drawn in 1881.  Many thanks to Rod E.

© Rod E

This is how the ship looked after converted to steam power and stationed in Zanzibar as Headquarters for the royal Navy.

Rod E has also sent in the service record of his ancestor (above), who served on HMS St Vincent, Duke of Wellington, London etc.  He has pointed out the signature of Captain Brownrigg the year before he was killed by slavers, and also the training ship Atalanta shortly before it disappeared in 1880. The Captain of the Excellent who also signed this service record in 1884 was J. A. Fisher (John Arbuthnot Fisher), who later became the top Admiral (First Sea Lord) in charge of the Royal Navy.  (these signatures are off to the far right hand side)

© Rod E

A List of "Dhows captured by boats of HMS London" between September 1880 and September 1882.

© Rod E

Another great piece sent in by Rod E, whose ancestor kept this record either as a clerk aboard the London, or for his share of the prize money.  Highlighted in green is a record of Captain Brownrigg capturing a Dhow (arab slavers boat) on October 8th 1881.  He was killed shortly after this.  The next highlighted record is of the next captain "Luxmore" who took over after Brownrigg.

Many thanks to Rod for this great information.

 

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AVIATION PRINTS

Click above to see all of our aviation art index - Eight random half price aviation items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Aviation Art Offers

Hurricane LK-M of No.87 Squadron piloted by Flt Lt Alex Thom DFC limps over the south coast of England on 19th August 1942. While supporting troops on the ground at Dieppe, the Hurricane was hit by ground fire and lost oil pressure. Alex Thom got the damaged aircraft back to Britain, making a forced landing at East Den. Ferried back to 87 Sqn's airfield, he immediately set off once more for Dieppe in Hurricane LK-A.

A Welcome Shore by Ivan Berryman. (AP)
Half Price! - £90.00
 Designed by the great Ernst Heinkel, the diminutive D.1 was an essential stop-gap that provided the Austro-Hungarian pilots with a front line fighter until they were able to re-equip with Albatros scouts in the Summer of 1917. This little aircraft performed well and was generally held in high regard by its pilots, although it did have some shortcomings, namely that forward vision was extremely limited and the Schwarzloses gun was completely concealed in the overwing pod that made it inaccessible in the air. Most unusual of all was its interplane strut arrangement, designed to reduce drag, which gave it the nicknames Starstrutter or Spider. These examples are shown passing above the German cruiser Derfflinger. 

Brandenburg D.1 by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Half Price! - £300.00
 Under the watchful eye of his more experienced tutor a trainee pilot gets his first taste of the Spitfire Mk.IIa, airborne from Tangmere early in 1941. the nearest aircraft is P7856 (YT-C) which enjoyed a long career, surviving until 1945.

The Fledgling by Ivan Berryman. (E)
Half Price! - £95.00
 Paratroopers of the 1st Battalion sort their kit out and get ready to enplane the waiting American Dakota C-47s of the 14 and 59 Squadrons/61st Troop Carrier Group.  The paratroops took off simultaneously from Saltby and Barkston, commencing at 1121.  All planes were in the air by 1155.  A relatively uneventful trip over the northern route to the Netherlands resulted in not a plane being shot down; only five were slightly damaged.  The 1st Battalion were dropped at 1403, 2nd Battalion at 1353 and the 3rd Battalion at 1356, all at DZ-X, west of Wolfhezen some eight miles west of Arnhem.  The Battalion orders were for three different routes to the Arnhem Bridge.  1st Battalion took the Leopard route, 2nd Battalion Tiger route and the 3rd Battalion Lion route.  Only the 2nd Battalion, commanded by Lt colonel John Frost managed to fight their way to the bridge.

Market Garden. Arnhem by Graeme Lothian. (P)
Half Price! - £1800.00

 The Hawker Hurricane powered by the powerful Rolls Royce Merlin engine is shown in combat with Luftwaffe aircraft during the Battle of Britain. The Hurricane played a major role in the aerial victory along with its companion the Spitfire.

Merlin Roar by Anthony Saunders. (F)
Half Price! - £50.00
 The end of an era.  British Airways Concorde G-BOAG moments before touching down at Heathrow for the very last time.

Final Touchdown by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £15.00
 With a final 47 victories to his credit, Robert Alexander Little was one of the highest-scoring British aces of World War 1, beginning his career with the famous No 8 (Naval) Squadron in 1916, flying Sopwith Pup N5182, as shown here. On 21st April 1917, he was attacked and shot down by six aircraft of Jasta Boelke, Little being thrown from the cockpit of his Sopwith Camel on impact with the ground. As the German aircraft swooped in to rake the wreckage with machine gun fire, Little pulled his Webley from its holster and began returning fire before being assisted by British infantry with their Lewis guns. Such was the character of this great pilot who finally met his death whilst attacking Gotha bombers on the night of 27th May 1918.

Captain Robert Little by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Half Price! - £290.00
 Tiger Moth sprays a potato field in southern England, early 1960s.  Australian-born Jim, served during World War II on B.25 Mitchell bombers before pioneering crop dusting and topdressing in New Zealand with ex-military De Havilland Tiger Moths which he converted himself for the purpose.  He went on to form a company called Crop Culture, which specialised in aerial spraying equipment, both in New Zealand and in the UK, before becoming a partner in the newly-formed Britten-Norman aircraft company which produced the Islander and Trislander utility transport aircraft in England.

Crop Culture - Tiger Moth by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - £700.00

 

NAVAL PRINTS

Click above to see all of our naval art index - Eight random half price naval items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Naval Art Offers

HMS Glowworm, burning severely after receiving hits from the mighty Admiral Hipper, is depicted turning to begin her heroic sacrifice off the Norwegian coast on 8th April 1940. Hugely out-gunned and already crippled, Glowworms captain, Lieutenant-Commander Roope rammed his destroyer into the side of the Admiral Hipper, inflicting a 40 metre rip in its armour belt before drifting away and exploding. 38 British sailors were rescued from the sea and Roope was awarded a posthumous VC for his bravery, the first earned by the Royal Navy in WWII.

The Attack on the Admiral Hipper by HMS Glowworm by Ivan Berryman (AP)
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HMS Lion with her sister ship HMS Princess Royal are shown firing on the German High Seas Fleet which can be seen in the distance during the Battle of Jutland.

HMS Lion at the Battle of Jutland by Ivan Berryman (AP)
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 The E-class light cruiser HMS Emerald is shown off the Newfoundland coast in company with a Flower class corvette.  Between October 1939 and August 1940, HMS Emerald carried £58 million in gold from Britain to Canada.

HMS Emerald by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £15.00
VAR344B.  H.M.A.S. Nizam 1943 by Brian Wood.
H.M.A.S. Nizam 1943 by Brian Wood (B)
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Nimrod MR2P from 201 squadron based at RAF Kinloss, climbs away under full power during NATO exercises off the west coast of Scotland. The Nimrod has just completed simulated depth charge attacks on the fleet submarine HMS Spartan and is returning to Kinloss for breakfast. Spartan turns and heads for the Clyde Submarine Base at Faslane on the Gareloch.

Good Morning, Spartan by Robert Barbour.
Half Price! - £55.00
 Key ships of the British task Force sail in close formation in the Mediterranean Sea during the build-up to the coalition liberation of Iraq in march 2003. Ships pictured left to right, include ATS Argus (A135), a Type 42 destroyer in the extreme distance, the flagship HMS ark Royal (RO7), RFA Orangeleaf (A110), LSL Sir Percival (L3036), the Commando and helicopter carrier HMS ocean (L12) and the Type 42 destroyer HMS Liverpool (D92) 

NTG03 - Task Force to Iraq by Ivan Berryman (P)
Half Price! - £3000.00
Depicting Titanic with the sun going down for the last time.

Titanic by Robert Barbour (AP)
Half Price! - £50.00
 HMS Medway was the first Royal navy submarine Depot ship that was designed for the purpose from the outset. She is shown here with a quintet of T-class submarines on her starboard side, whilst an elderly L-Class begins  to move away having completed replenishment. HMS Medway was sunk on 30th June 1940 having been torpedoed by U-372 off Alexandria.

HMS Medway by Ivan Berryman
Half Price! - £15.00

 

MILITARY PRINTS

Click above to see all of our military art index - Eight random half price military items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Military Art Offers

 In his 50s with 30 years experience, who has now attained High Centurian rank and commands the entire 1st Cohort.

Primus Pilus by Chris Collingwood. (Y)
Half Price! - £65.00
DHM821.  Austrian Generals Watching the Battle by Albrecht Adam.
Austrian Generals Watching the Battle by Albrecht Adam.
Half Price! - £30.00
 The Pak 40 - a hard hitting 75mm German anti-tank gun-seen here mounted on an SPW for greater battlefield mobility was essentially a scaled up version of the PaK 38 debuted in Russia where it was needed to combat the newest Soviet tanks there.  It was designed to fire the same low-capacity APCBC, HE and HL projectiles which had been standardized for usage in the long barreled KwK 40 tank guns.

Pak40 Mounted on SPW Half-Track by Jason Askew. (P)
Half Price! - £340.00
DHM1856P. The Ludendorff Offensive, Spring 1918 by Jason Askew.

The Ludendorff Offensive, Spring 1918 by Jason Askew. (P)
Half Price! - £2800.00

<b>One copy only with slight scratches on image which would not be noticeable once framed, and a small piece torn off the bottom left corner of the border only. 

 </b>
Flora MacDonalds Farewell to Bonnie Prince Charlie by George William Joy. (Y)
Half Price! - £30.00
Private Thomas Brown of the 3rd kings own regiment of Dragoons, is knighted by King George the II, (The last reigning British Monarch to be at a Battle) Brown had recaptured the regimental guidon from the French during the battle.

King George II Knighting Trooper Brown After the Battle of Dettingen by J P Beadle (B)
Half Price! - £25.00
 Taking over command of the British Northern Army in 1777, Lt Gen Burgoyne began a march to Albany to join forces with Lt Gen Sir William Howe.  After taking Fort Ticonderoga on route he learned that Howe was leaving for Pennsylvania.  Becoming desperately short on supplies he decided to press on the Albany regardless but found the road blocked by a Continental army under Maj Gen Horatio Gates.  Burgoyne decided not to engage the enemys position frontally but to turn their left at Freemans Farm.  After a day of fierce fighting the British held the field but at a heavy price in casualties.  On the 7th October the Colonial army, after receiving continual reinforcements attacked Howes position (the battle became known as Bemis Heights) and he was forced to retire to Saratoga.

The 9th Regiment, at the Battle of Freemans Farm, September 19th 1777 by Brian Palmer
Half Price! - £50.00
 Study for the original painting March Past of the Grenadier Guards.
2nd Life Guards Band 1829 by Mark Churms. (P)
Half Price! - £150.00

 

SPORT PRINTS

Click above to see all of our sport art index - Eight random half price sport items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Sport Art Offers

Steeplechasers competing for the Blue Riband.

Chasing for Gold by Chris Howells.
Half Price! - £65.00
B48. Michael Schumacher/ Ferrari F.310 by Ivan Berryman

Michael Schumacher/ Ferrari F.310 by Ivan Berryman
Half Price! - £40.00
DHM1480P. Jenson Button 2004 BAR 006 by Ivan Berryman (P)
Jenson Button 2004 BAR 006 by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - £900.00


Heroes of Goodison Park by Doug Harker. (Y)
Half Price! - £165.00



Jenson Button - Canada 2011 by Stephen Doig. (P)
Half Price! - £240.00
SFA7.  Galileo by Stephen Smith.

Galileo by Stephen Smith.
Half Price! - £70.00
 2003 World Superbike Champion, Neil Hodgson with James Toseland in his slipstream.  British World Superbike - June 2003. 
Battle of Britain by Dave Foord.
Half Price! - £130.00
 The Intercontinental Formula was first organised by British Racing Drivers Club to allow the racing of cars with 2000cc to 3000cc engines. At the time the 1500cc limit of Formula 1 had been instituted by the international ruling body in the belief that the smaller cars would mean safer racing. In reality this meant that the relatively easy to handle Formula 1 cars could be driven by less experienced drivers almost as fast as the most experienced master drivers. The result was that the car with fractionally more power was the deciding factor in winning the race, rather than the better driver but this also compromised track safety. The introduction of the Intercontinental Formula was seen as more of a challenge for the drivers, with the larger and more powerful cars requiring greater skill and experience than to drive the 1500cc cars of Formula 1. The 13th International Trophy on Saturday 6th May 1961 was the first race of the season to carry World Championship points and consisted of 80 laps of Silverstone, a total of 233 miles. Stirling Moss, having already won the International Sports Car Race in a Lotus earlier that day, was driving Rob Walkers 2.5 litre Cooper Climax and qualified 2nd on the grid despite being unhappy with the steering of his car. The starting grid front row was Bruce McLaren, Stirling Moss, Jack Brabham and Graham Hill and by the time the race started at 2.30pm a heavy rain meant that the track was not only soaked but also covered in oil and rubber from the previous races. World Champion Jack Brabham made a superb start, passed Moss and was first into Copse and by lap 4 Moss was in 3rd place led by Surtees and Brabham. Due to appalling conditions and poor visibility many of the cars were spinning or leaving the track and by lap 13 Brabham and Moss were 1st and 2nd with the rest of the field some distance behind. Moss now poured on the pressure and for the next few laps he tried to pass as he harried Brabham in a duel for the lead. The pair were now beginning to lap the tailenders and, at around a quarter of the distance Moss was held up by Flockhart, Brabhams team member, who had allowed Brabham to pass. Moss gestured angrily to Flockhart as he was unable to follow Brabham and, as the rain paused for a while the pace became faster. Suddenly and quite dramatically Moss passed both Flockhart and Brabham and within 2 laps had gained 5 seconds on the World Champion. As the rain returned in a deluge Moss mercilessly pushed on, increasing his lead to 1.5 minutes by the halfway mark. Although he could have taken things easily at this point Moss drove on relentlessly at a seemingly impossible pace and was now lapping most of the field for a second time. By the ¾ stage he completed his humiliation of Brabham by passing him for a second time to lap him representing a 3 mile lead. Moss eventually won the race in 2hrs 41 mins 19.2 secs, 1.5 laps ahead of Brabham and at least two laps ahead of the rest of the field in what were treacherous conditions. At the end of the race Moss summed up the experience as a nice ride, having proved himself to be one of the greatest and fastest drivers in the world under any conditions. Sir Stirling Moss believes this to be one of his finest ever drives.

A Moment of Triumph by Gerald Coulson. (Y)
Half Price! - £75.00

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