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HMS Vulcan, Torpedo Boat Depot Ship. HMS Vulcan built at Portsmouth Dockyard and launched 13th June 1889. Her main purpose was to launch smaller torpedo boats against enemy shipping. She looked very similar to a cruiser except for two large cranes used for deploying torpedo boats, similar protective deck armour to a cruiser. In 1915 she was used as a submarine depot ship and in 1931 became a training hulk and was renamed HMS Defiance III, finally being scrapped in 1955.

Displacement: 6,600 tons     Speed: 20 knots.    Armament: eight 4.7 ins guns replaced in 1915 by four 3 pdr guns. She carried six 2nd class torpedo boats.   Complement: 432.

HM Torpedo-Boat Depot Ship Vulcan : Hoisting Out a Torpedo Boat

Photograph shows Vulcan hoisting out one of six torpedo boats the she carried. The Vulcan was the only ship in the British Navy in 1896 with special cranes to do this. The cranes were hydraulic and could lift 30 tons each.

Original Photographic image from quality magazine published in 1896 image  size 8" x 5" approx , plus title and specifications. price £15 plus £3 post for UK £10 overseas, recorded airmail  order number AN2/62 order photograph here

HMS Vulcan

The Vulcan seen here bows-on, was the only craft of her special class in existence. She was a cruiser, fighting ship, repairing shop, torpedo depot, and floating dockyard. As a cruiser and fighting ship, she mounted 20 quick-firing guns and torpedo tubes; as a repairing shop she was fitted with lathes, drilling, planing, slotting and punching machines, circular saws, workshops and smithery, forges and furnaces; as a torpedo depot, she carried on board large supplies of torpedos, torpedo stores, mines and mining apparatus; as a floating dockyard, she contained a small flotilla of torpedo boats with cranes for lifting them, as well as all sorts of special appliances. Her raison d'etre was torpedo nurse and general repairing establishment afloat for general service with a Fleet. She measured 350 ft between perpendiculars, breadth of 58 ft, mean draught of 25 ft and a displacement of 6,630 tons.

Original Photographic image from quality magazine published in 1896 image  size 10" x 8" approx , plus title and specifications. price £20 plus £3 post for UK £10 overseas, recorded airmail  order number AN2-44 order photograph here

The Vulcan, Royal Sovereign and Thetis at Plataea Harbour c.1900.

For a considerable portion of the year the Mediterranean Fleet cruised eastward. This work was not well liked as it did not present the social amenities found at Malta or some of the other Italian and Spanish ports, and after all life on board was sufficiently monotonous in 1900 for a little excitement to be needed. Greece was friendly to Great Britain and allowed the navy to make limited use of her ports and islands. Here torpedoes were run and gun practise was carried out. The British ships shown at anchor above are in the small port of Plataea.

The Captain of the Vulcan and His Officers 1896

Captain Charles Grey Robinson, in command of the Vulcan and the officers of his ship are shown in the photograph in 1896. The Vulcan was employed on what was termed Particular Service on the Mediterranean Station. During the winter months she would go to Volo or Plataea in the Aegean Sea for the purpose of carrying out torpedo and mining classes, the ships in the Mediterranean Fleet were detached in turn, two or three at a time to bear her company.

Original Photographic image from quality magazine published in 1896 image  size 8" x 5" approx , plus title and specifications. price £20 plus £3 post for UK £10 overseas, recorded airmail  order number AN2/62b  order photograph here

The Workshop on board HMS Vulcan

One of the special features of the Vulcan was her workshop. In it were five lathes of various sizes (from 18in centre and 17 ft bed, down to 5in centre and 3ft 6 in bed), two drilling machines with complete sets of twist drills and boring bars, planing, shaping and slotting, punching and shearing machines, and a circular saw bench. These were all driven by an engine placed in the workshop. For casting and founding purposes there was a hot air furnace complete with crucibles capable of melting down 2 cwt of iron or brass, the air supplied under pressure by a fan which worked at 2,000 revs a minute. A sand pit, moulding boxes, and other appliances were also placed at hand in close proximity, so that any work required could be expeditiously performed. There were also fitters benches and vices, and a store-room complete with all kinds of tool likely to be needed.

Original Photographic image from quality magazine published in 1896 image  size 10" x 8" approx , plus title and specifications. price £20 plus £3 post for UK £10 overseas, recorded airmail  order number AN2/63

 

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AVIATION PRINTS

Click above to see all of our aviation art index - Eight random half price aviation items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Aviation Art Offers

 Maurice <i>Peter</i> Brown damages a Dornier Do.17 in his 41 Squadron Spitfire on 30th September 1940.

Dorniers Demise by Ivan Berryman. (P)
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Junker Ju87B-1s of 7 Staffel, Stg 77 swoop down to attack coastal targets. This opening phase of the Battle of Britain was to prove very costly for the Stuka squadrons as they found they could no longer operate unescorted against the RAF.

Stukas over England, South Coast, July 1940 by David Pentland.
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 The C-17 Globemaster III is the newest, and the most flexible cargo aircraft to enter the airlift force.  It is capable of rapid strategic delivery of troops and all types of cargo to main operating bases or directly to forward bases in the deployment area.  The aircraft is also able to perform tactical airlift and airdrop missions when required.  The inherent flexibility and performance characteristics of the C-17 force improve the ability of the total airlift system to fulfill the worldwide air mobility requirements of the United States.  The ultimate measure of airlift effectiveness is the ability to rapidly project and sustain an effective combat force close to a potential battle area.  Threats to U.S. interests have changed in recent years, and the size and weight of U.S.-mechanized firepower and equipment have grown in response to improved 
capabilities of potential adversaries.  This trend has significantly increased air mobility requirements, particularly in the area of large or heavy outsize cargo.  As a result, newer and more flexible airlift aircraft are needed to meet potential armed contingencies, peacekeeping or humanitarian missions worldwide.  The C-17 was designed and built with this new world order in mind.

The Globemasters by Dru Blair.
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 Two Spitfire Mk1Bs of 92 Squadron patrol the south coast from their temporary base at Ford, here passing over the Needles rocks, Isle of Wight, in the Spring of 1942.

In Them We Trust by Ivan Berryman. (C)
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 The Short Stirling was the RAFs first four-engined bomber to enter service and it served throughout WWII in many roles including bomber, minelayer, troop carrier and glider-tug. The lack of power produced by its engines severely limited the loads carried by Stirlings. On long-range trips such as Italy, even with a greatly reduced bomb load the aircraft could barely clear the Alps. Despite very large losses due to its operational limitations, those that flew this big, agile aircraft, came to respect and look upon it with it with affection.

The Night Shift by Philip West. (Y)
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 A pair of English Electric Lightning F3s of 111 squadron depart. Reheat selected, they accelerate rapidly to blast off, cascading spray from a rain-soaked runway. This is the classic interceptor, with superb handling qualities and unmatched climb-to-height performance. The Lightning is the only British-designed and built fighter capable of achieving twice the speed of sound. The RAF took delivery in 1960 and they remained in front-line service until phased out in 1988. The last of the classic single-seat fighters, the Lightning enters the hall of fame alongside the Camel, Fury, Hurricane and Spitfire. The artist was once able to fly a two-seat version- Lightning T5- at just over 1000mph- which he describes as an unforgettable experience.

Thunder & Lightnings by Gerald Coulson. (Y)
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 Mystery still surrounds just why Manfred von Richthofen risked so much in chasing the novice pilot Wilfred Wop May into Allied-occupied territory on the morning of Sunday, 21st April 1918, but it was to be his last flight, this error of judgement costing him his life. Von Richthofen had broken from the main fight involving Sopwith Camels of 209 Sqn to chase Mays aircraft, but found himself under attack from the Camel of Captain Roy Brown. All three aircraft turned and weaved low along the Somme River, the all red Triplane coming under intense fire from the ground as well as from Browns aircraft. No one knows exactly who fired the crucial bullet, but Manfred von Richthofens aircraft was seen to dive suddenly and impact with the ground. The Red Baron was dead and his amazing run of 80 victories was over. The painting shows Mays aircraft (D3326) in the extreme distance, pursued by DR.1 (425/17) and Browns Camel (B7270) in the foreground.

Captain Roy Brown engages the Red Baron, 21st April 1918 by Ivan Berryman. (GL)
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 Watched by keen eyes, an Upkeep bomb arrives on the threshold to be loaded onto the special cradle beneath a Lancaster of 617 Dambusters Squadron on the eve of their perilous journey to the Ruhr Valley on the night of 16th May 1943 when the Möhne and Eder dams were breached under the codename Operation Chastise.

Bombing Up by Ivan Berryman. (P)
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NAVAL PRINTS

Click above to see all of our naval art index - Eight random half price naval items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Naval Art Offers

Captain Charles Vane was born in 1680, and was an English pirate who preyed upon English and French shipping.  Vane began piracy in 1716 and lasted 3 years. Vane captured a Barbados sloop and then a large 12-gun brigantine, which he renamed the Ranger.   Vane was among the pirate captains who operated out of the Bohama at the notorious base at New Providence after the colony had been abandoned by the British.  His pirate attacks made Captain Charles Vane well known to the Royal Navy and in February of 1718 Vincent Pearse, commander of HMS Phoenix cornered Vane on his ship the Lark.  Vane  had heard of the recent royal pardons that had been offered to pirates in exchange for a guarantee they would quit plundering, so Vane claimed he had actually been en route to surrender to Pearse and accepted the pardon on the spot,  Charle Vane gained his freedom but as soon as he was free of Pearse he ignored the pardon and resumed his pirate ways.  Charles Vane was again captured and in 1721 was executed by hanging at Gallows Point, Port Royal, Jamaica on March 29th 1721.

Captain Charles Vane by Chris Collingwood.
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 Between 24th may and 4th June 1940 an extraordinary armada of craft, large and small, naval and civilian, embarked on one of the greatest rescue missions in history. the evacuation of 330,000 British and French troops from the beaches of Dunkirk in northern France. the destroyer HMS Wakeful dominates the foreground here as troops pour onto the beaches and harbour moles in search of salvation. Both Wakeful and distant HMS Grafton were lost during the evacuation.

Dunkirk by Ivan Berryman.
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 Designed by the great Ernst Heinkel, the diminutive D.1 was an essential stop-gap that provided the Austro-Hungarian pilots with a front line fighter until they were able to re-equip with Albatros scouts in the Summer of 1917. This little aircraft performed well and was generally held in high regard by its pilots, although it did have some shortcomings, namely that forward vision was extremely limited and the Schwarzloses gun was completely concealed in the overwing pod that made it inaccessible in the air. Most unusual of all was its interplane strut arrangement, designed to reduce drag, which gave it the nicknames Starstrutter or Spider. These examples are shown passing above the German cruiser Derfflinger. 

Brandenburg D.1 by Ivan Berryman. (AP)
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 Besstrashniy (meaning Fearless) 434 heavy rocket ASW Destroyer is shown swinging to the port side of Pyotr Velikiy (meaning Peter the Great) a Kirov Class Cruiser as they clear a path for the carrier Minsk.

Arctic Waters by Randall Wilson. (AP)
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 The newly converted Command Helicopter Cruiser HMS Blake leaves Grand Harbour Malta at the end of the 1960s.  In the background, the old Submarine Depot ship HMS Forth lies at anchor at the very end of her long career.

HMS Blake by Ivan Berryman.
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 Royal Fleet Auxiliary Olna prepares to receive HMS Active (F171) during the Falklands campaign of 1982.  HMS Coventry (D118) is in the background
RFA Olna by Ivan Berryman (AP)
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 Completed in 1916, the Resolution was one of the finest capital ships in the Royal Navy, serving in many theatres with her sister ships, Royal Sovereign, Royal Oak, Ramillies and Revenge, she is shown here in 1936.

HMS Resolution by Ivan Berryman. (Y)
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The Pedestal Convoy of August 1942 was one of the most heavily protected convoys in the history of sea warfare.  Fourteen of the fastest cargo ships of the time were protected by 4 carriers, 2 battleships, 7 cruisers and 32 destroyers.  The destroyer HMS Ashanti is in the foreground of the painting.  Also depicted are the carrier HMS Indomitable, with her Hurricanes cirling the convoy overhead, and the cargoe ship Port Chalmers to the right of the picture.

Pedestal Convoy by Anthony Saunders (Y)
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MILITARY PRINTS

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Some Current Half Price Military Art Offers

 The Old Guard being asked to surrender at the end of the Battle of Waterloo.
The Last Stand of the Old Guard by Robert Hillingford. (Y)
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 Showing William III in full Black Armour at the time of the Battle of Boyne.

William III by Chris Collingwood. (Y)
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As the French regiment man the postion while under heavy attack, a French drummer boy and soldier are seen attending the wounded mascot dog of the regiment.
The Dog of the Regiment is Wounded by Horace Vernet. (Y)
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DHM0270P. Unhooked, Kings Troop R.H.A Number 2, by Mark Churms.

Unhooked, Kings Troop R.H.A Number 2, by Mark Churms. (P)
Half Price! - £2500.00

DHM406.  Allied Generals Before Sebastopol by Thomas Jones Barker.

Allied Generals Before Sebastopol by Thomas Jones Barker.
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 Troops of the 1st Hampshires assaulting Gold Beach during the Normandy Landings. Gold beach was one of the British beaches on D-Day. Gold beach was the western most beach of the British beaches, on D-Day. Gold beach was between two twenty metre high cliffs where German fortifications had been built. The beach had been protected by concrete casemates which took some time to break through. This happened with support form British tanks in the afternoon of D-day 6th June. The British tanks and reinforcements moved off the beaches towards Saint-Come-de-Fresene and Arromanches which were both liberated by 9pm.

D-Day Gold Beach, 6th June 1944 by Simon Smith.
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MARK2. Original Oil Study of the Union Brigade painting by Mark Churms.
Original Oil Study of the Union Brigade painting by Mark Churms. (P)
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 Superb figure study of the 82nd Airborne in 1944.

82nd Airborne by Chris Collingwood.
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SPORT PRINTS

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Some Current Half Price Sport Art Offers

The legendary Welsh rugby union captain Gareth Edwards is brought to life in the triple portrait. Gareth Edwards is revered in Wales and considered one of the finest players ever. in part of the montage he is shown going over for a try against England.
Gareth Edwards by Darren Baker. (Y)
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SPC5002. Jeremy Guscott by Robert Highton.

Jeremy Guscott by Robert Highton.
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 Jonjo O'Neill.  Cheltenham Champion Hurdle 1984, Cheltenham Gold Cup 1986.

Dawn Run by Peter Deighan.
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 Michael Schumacher and Ferrari.
Encore by Graham Bosworth
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 A quartet of Ferrari 801s are warmed up at Rouen-les-Essarts.  French Grand Prix 1957.

Thoroughbreds in the Paddock by Ray Goldsbrough.
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 A product of United's magnificent youth policy, Nicky Butt has become an invaluable player in the most successful side in the club's history.  Gary Keane's portrayal of Nicky Butt captures the tenacity, determination and power of one of the country's leading midfield players.

Nicky Butt by Gary Keane.
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 A celebration of Nigel Mansells success in winning the Formula 1 World Championship and the Indy Car Championship in successive years. A celebration of the magnificent talents of Nigel Mansell. He made his debut in Formula 1 in 1981 and his superb driving technique made an instant impact. He recorded victory after victory coming agonisingly close to being world champion many times before gaining his well deserved Formula 1 title in 1992. The following year he recorded an unprecedented double, gaining the Indy Car championship in 1993. A feat that reserves his name quite rightly in the record books.
Mansell by Peter Deighan.
Half Price! - £45.00
 In 1992 Matthew graduated in Geography from St. Catherine's College, Oxford, where he was President of the Oxford Rowing Club.  He took part in the Oxford and Cambridge Boat Race in 1990 and 1991, when Oxford beat Cambridge by substantial distances.  Also in 1992, at the age of only 21, Matthew had his first taste of Olympic success, when in a coxless pair with partner Sir Steve Redgrave, he won the gold medal at the Barcelona Olympics.  Prior to that Olympic win he and Redgrave had enjoyed an unbeaten international season, and it was already obvious that Matthew was developing to become one of the world's greatest oarsmen.  At the Atlanta Olympics in 1996 the Pinsent / Redgrave duo won another gold medal and throughout the nineties their outstanding combination also brought them seven world championship golds.  Their unbroken run of success continued through to the millennium Olympic games in Sydney when Pinsent, again with Redgrave (now in a coxless four with James Cracknell and Tim Foster) again triumphed earning Pinsent his third Olympic gold medal.  The race in which he did it was voted Britain's greatest sporting moment and the crew secured themselves a very special place in the heart of the nation.  After Sydney, Matthew formed a seemingly invincible coxless pair partnership with James Cracknell MBE.  Undefeated throughout 2001, they went on to complete a unique feat in the history of rowing, by winning the coxless pair at the world championships in Lucerne, a mere two hours after winning the coxed pairs.  In the 2002 world championships in Seville they defended their coxless pairs title, beating an experienced Australian crew who had beaten them in Lucerne earlier in the year and breaking the world record by 4 seconds in the process.  On Saturday 21st August 2004 at the Athens Olympic games, Matthew Pinsent CBE entered Olympic history.  In one of the classic sporting moments of all time, he led the Great Britain coxless four to victory over the Canadian world champions by only eight hundredths of a second.  Matthew was awarded the MBE in the 1993 New Year's Honours List and the CBE in the New Year's Honours List 2003.  In the 2005 New Year's Honours List he was awarded a knighthood.

Sir Matthew Pinsent CBE by James Owen.
Half Price! - £70.00

Everything we obtain for this site is shown on the site, we do not have any more photos, crew lists or further information on any of the ships.

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