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A History of HMS Nelson

battleships-cruisers.co.uk wish to thank Pete Knight for the following information and photographs of his father, the crew and HMS Nelson. (Pete Knight's superb website is shown next in our military, naval and aviation history and gift web ring - shown on our front page)

Skip to Crew Photos  or  Scrapping Nelson Photos

HMS Nelson aground at Portsmouth photos.

 

Nov 1921 -The keel was laid down by Vickers-Armstrong at the Walkers Yard, Newcastle-upon-Tyne.

3 Sep 1925 - She was launched by Dame Caroline Bridgeman, wife of the First Lord of the Admiralty

May 1927 - She recorded 23.55 knots, developing 46,031 SHP.

26 May 1927 - To the people watching from the Cornish coast, the ship doing her steaming trials over the Polperro Mile was unlike any ship that they had ever seen before. Obviously she was a man o' war, but all her superstructure was crowded aft, and the only features of her very long fo'c's'le ere the humps of her three heavy gun turrets. The date was 26 May 1927.

09 Aug 1927 - A navigating party from Portsmouth took the ship over from the builders at the Walker Yard.

15 Aug 1927 - She was brought up to full compliment and commissioned at Portsmouth by Captain S J Meyrick and she  remained a Portsmouth manned ship throughout her life. During the next few weeks her officers and men exercised her equipment and armament, and came to know her eccentricities. The new 16-inch guns had numerous teething troubles, and caused more blast damage than had been expected. Barrel life was disappointing as against the proven 15-inch gun. The huge box structure of the control tower was dubbed "Queen Anne's Mansions" (a reference the Admiralty buildings in London).

21 Oct 1927 - On Trafalgar Day the flag of Vice-Admiral Sir Hubert Brand was hoisted and Nellie became the flagship of the Commander-in-Chief, Home Fleet. For the next fourteen years she continued this role, wearing the flags of eight Admirals. Until the war came her service was mainly in home waters, but she regularly went to Gibraltar for the annual spring cruise and for exercises with the Mediterranean Fleet, and she visited Malta on numerous occasions. She cruised to the West Indies twice, the first time going through the Panama Canal; and she went to the Scandinavian ports of Copenhagen, Oslo and Stockholm.

1930 - She played a part in the rescue of the mater and 22 crew of the Greek ship Fofo. After an explosion in merchantman's cargo of Welsh coal, the ship was abandoned and later sank. It was ships of the Atlantic Fleet who picked up her SOS signals and it was Nelson that discovered the Fofo's lifeboats.

1932-33 - Modifications were made to the bridge structure, and in the following year two MK.V eight barrelled pom-pom mountings were added, port and starboard, close to the funnel, and in the same refit the torpedo range finder towers were taken out. A year later multiple machine-guns were fitted at the after corners of the control tower.

Jan 1934 - As Nelson steamed slowly out of Portsmouth, she drifted to starboard away from the narrow channel and went aground on the shoal known as Hamilton Bank.

04 Oct 1935 - She was selected for tests of the prototype "Walrus" amphibian aircraft and, one of these machines landed on the flat calm water along side the Nelson at Portland.

1937 - Extra horizontal armour was fitted on lower deck and platform deck, the high angle control installation was improved, and a ship's side crane was fitted in the port waist.

1937-1938- Refit - HMS Nelson, in 1938. A pom-pom has been added on each side of the funnel, and one on the quarterdeck. There is a quadruple o.5" MG on each side of the bridge and sided just behind it, and a HA director has been added to the foretop.

03 Sep 1939- At the outbreak of the war she was at Scapa Flow, and was removed to Loch Ewe after the sinking of the Royal Oak. Also present at Scapa Flow were HMS Rodney, HMS Royal Sovereign and HMS Ramillies. The glass case containing the uniform worn by Lord Nelson at the Battle of Trafalgar was sent ashore by drifter to Scrabster and then on to the National Bank of Scotland at Thurso for safe keeping. It now stands in the National Maritime Museum at Greenwich, but throughout the war a lock of Nelson's hair was kept in a small picture frame on HMS Nelson.26 Sep 1939 - While escorting the severely damaged submarine Spearfish across the North Sea with the rest of the fleet, and 150 miles off the coast of Norway she was attacked by German aircraft. She opened up her 4.7's in anger for the first time. The Germans inflicted no damage but it was realised that the Nelson had inadequate air defence. The Germans claimed to have sunk HMS Kestrel, a Royal Naval Air Station shore base.

08 Oct 1939 - Nelson sailed with Rodney to try to intercept German forces reported to include the battle-cruiser Gneisenau and the cruiser Koln, north-east of the Shetlands. No contact was made, but the fleet continued to search until Rodney was ordered to the Clyde with rudder defects on the 29th. Instead of returning to Scapa, where the defences were not yet on a fully effective war footing,  Nelson proceeded to a 'secret' base at Loch Ewe on the west coast of Scotland.

30 Oct 1939   - The Norwegian Operation and the Torpedo Crisis.

One of the less popular stories about the elite German U-bootwaffe is the torpedo crisis of late 1939 -- early 1940. Although this was the period during which some of the most outstanding U-boat successes were scored, it was full of bitter disappointments and equally resounding misses as well. It is a common notion among those interested in the U-boat war that the magnetic firing pistol of the German torpedoes was the 'cause of all evil.' This, however, is only partially true. For the most part, the magnetic pistol malfunctioned against capital warships, or so it seemed. This topic will receive further coverage as our story unfolds. The first case of torpedo failure took place very early in the war. Immediately after the outbreak of hostilities, the British Admiralty sent several aircraft carriers into the waters west of the British Isles, the important western approaches, as a measure against the penetration of German submarines into the Atlantic and as a protection measure for convoys. Since U-boats relied mainly on surface attacks, ASDIC being unable to detect them on the surface, continuous air patrol was a grave threat to their operational agility. Consequently, U-boats engaged the carriers one-on-one. Well, not really, since the carriers always enjoyed a protective destroyer screen. The odds against which the U-boats fought, therefore, were particularly high on such occasions. An isolated instance occurred after Prien's feat in Scapa Flow. As a result of the ignominious loss of the Royal Oak.

As far as Loch Ewe, Firth of Forth and Firth of Clyde were concerned, BdU dispatched boats armed with magnetic mines, since there was a significant probability that the ships are not at anchor when the boats arrived. Between October 1939 and March 1st 1940 the U-bootwaffe practically encircled Britain with mines, laying thousands at every more important British port. Captain Roskill, the leading Allied historian of the Naval War during WWII and an author whom Dönitz himself repeatedly quotes in his memoirs, points to a figure of some 115 ships of 400,000 GNT lost to mines in less than 6 months from the beginning of the war. The mines, for a while, became by far more reliable than the defective torpedoes. The mining operations proves so successful that the Thames estuary itself was for a while crammed with ship wreckage. The same lucky Nelson, whom fate spared form Zahn's daring attack, hit a mine off Loch Ewe and, with its hull ripped open, almost sank.

31 Oct 1939 - Nelson arrived in Loch Ewe and the First Lord of the Admiralty, Winston Churchill, and First Sea Lord, Admiral Sir Dudley Pound, came on board to discuss with the C in C the use of the main fleet bases at Scapa Flow, Loch Ewe and Rosyth. A decision was taken to return to Scapa in the spring of 1940 when all defences would be secure.

21 Nov 1939 - The battle-cruisers

04 Dec 1939 - On one of her North sea patrols on December 4th  she entered Loch Ewe at thirteen knots, she passed over a  magnetic mine, whereupon her hull activated the mine and the Nelson lifted and shook to the tremendous explosion. There were 73 casualties. No deaths, but in the heads forward, many toilets shattered and their occupants suffered lacerations. The ships bottom was also torn in several places, mainly to starboard; outer bottom plating for a distance of 70 feet was forced inboard by about 4 feet, and flooding extended over a distance of 140 feet. There was shock damage to the ammunition supply machinery. Winston Churchill referred to her as  'our interesting invalid'. She managed to return to harbour to spend the next 8 months in dock being repaired and refitted.  U-31 (Leutnant Johannes Haberkost) laid the minefield on 27 Oct 1939.

08 Dec 1939 - She arrives at Portsmouth and has major repairs. Type 279/281 radar and three more octue pom-pom mountings are fitted, one on the quarterdeck and two abreast the mainmast where the after director control towers were removed. On 'B' and 'X' turrets four UP (Unrotated Projectile) mountings were installed. Also, gun shields were fitted to the open 4.7s, and an armoured 'zareba' round the 4.7-inch gun deck.

Jun 6 1940 - Sailed to complete her refit on the Clyde.

As she set course from Portsmouth, two minesweepers swept the channel ahead. It was a wise precaution for they explode two magnetic mines laid in her path.  A 20 barrel 7" UP launcher has been added on "C" and "B" turrets. Type 284 radar fitted. Purpose: main gunnery for large ships. Wavelength 50cm. Power output 25kw. Range 10 nautical miles.  First fitted to HMS Nelson. Very successful.

Sep 6 1940 - Repairs completed, she left Scapa with the Home Fleet for operation "DF". The object of the operation was to attack enemy shipping in the area between Sogne Fjord and the Grip Light off the Norwegian coast. Planes from the carrier Furious sank one ship of about 2,000 tons, and a second ship was abandoned by her crew.

Nov 6 1940 - With the Rodney and supporting ships, she sailed from Scapa to search for the Admiral Scheer in the Iceland-Faroes passage.

Nov 13 1940 - Returned to Scapa.

Feb 8 1941 - At the beginning of 1941, on February 8, the German force spotted convoy H.X. 106, which had sailed from Halifax for Great Britain on January 31. The convoy was escorted by the old Battle-ship HMS Ramillies, however, and in accordance with his orders Lutjens broke off contact, despite the fact that the captain of Scharnhorst had offered to draw off the escort and thus give Gneisenau the opportunity to annihilate the convoy. The plan entailed little risk as Scharnhorst was a good 11 knots faster than HMS Ramillies, but Lutjens stuck rigidly to his orders. A fortnight later, off Newfoundland, the German squadron sank three cargo vessels and two tankers of an America-bound convoy that had scattered on being attacked. Then, heading south-east, the German ships found themselves on March 3 less than 300 miles from Tenerife in the Canary islands, well-placed to attack convoys on the Gibraltar-Freetown run. On the morning of the 8th, a dozen merchantmen came over the horizon, escorted, however, by the battleship HMS Malaya, armed, like HMS Ramillies, with l5-inch guns. Still obeying orders, Lutjens stood off, though he did try to direct towards the convoy the two. U-boats operating in the area no easy task, as German surface vessels and U-boats did not use the same code, and it was only by the roundabout route Paris-Kernevel that he was able to pass on the information. Then Scharnhorst and Gneisenau, accompanied by their two supply ships, moved off north-west again to intercept the Halifax Great Britain route.  Here they managed to avoid the attentions of the battleship HMS Nelson while sinking or capturing 16 ships on March 15-16. "As day broke on March 16," write J. Vulliez and J. Mordal, "the squadron was surrounded by merchantmen which, seeing the Germans, scattered in all directions. The hunt began with Ermland forcing a large cargo vessel within range of Scharnhorst, whose guns quickly sank her. Immediately afterwards Gneisenau sank an unidentified ship of 5,000 tons at long range. And so the hunt went on: while Scharnhorst was sinking the 4,350 ton Silverfix, Uckermark forced five ships within range of Gneisenau, which picked them off one by one. Time was running out, and it was getting too late for the attackers to think of making any captures. At about 1500, just when the chase seemed over, the two Battle-cruisers increased speed and caught one more merchant man. It was about this time that Lutjens received orders to create a diversion, to enable Admiral Hipper and Admiral Scheer to slip through the Denmark Strait. With the choice of heading for the Azores or Brest, Lutjens chose the latter. He passed through the dangerous Iroise between the islands of Ushant and Sein at 0700 in March 22.

Mar 2 1941 - Proceeded to sea with King George V, cruisers Edinburgh and Nigeria and destroyers. This was the start of operation "Claymore", the first British amphibious operation of the war against enemy territory. The target was the Lofoten Islands, lying in the Vest Fjord in the approaches to Narvik. The big ships provided the covering force. The raiders entered Vest Fjord during the night of Mar 3rd and surprise was so complete that navigational lights were burning in the area of the Lofotens as the force approached at 0300 hrs. Each ship had a Norwegian pilot, and timing and navigation were perfect. The landings were unopposed, No 3 commando going ashore at Henningsvaer and Stamsund, and No 4 at Brettesnes and Svolvaer.

1941. - Her 16inch guns were in the Mediterranean protecting the Malta convoys. Her presence kept away the Italian Fleet, but torpedo bombers managed to hit her and put her out of action for several months North Africa, Sicily, Italy, Normandy, Malaya, Penang - the Nelson steamed 500,000 miles.

August 9th 1942. - "Pedestal" consisting of 59 warships and 14 merchant ships. South Africa's Vice Adm. Neville Syfret will lead this force from the battleship HMS Nelson. Joining her are her sister ship "HMS RODNEY", and three large carriers, "HMS VICTORIOUS", "HMS EAGLE" and "HMS INDOMITABLE", Britain's first multi-carrier ask force. A fourth carrier "HMS FURIOUS" will separately deliver 38 Spitfires to Malta. This mass of guns and armour is the muscle to protect 14 merchant ships, the fastest that can be found, loaded with 85,000 tons of cargo, mostly flour. Eleven are British, two American (Santa Elisa and Almeria Lykes) and the last an American ship with a British crew, Texaco's large, fast tanker, SS OHIO, one of the largest in the world. OHIO has been specially prepared for this mission, her engines placed on rubber housings, also given extra 3-inch and 5-inch AA guns, she is loaded with 11,500 tons of kerosene and diesel fuels, enough to keep Malta's stoves and Spitfires going till December. If OHIO does not reach Malta, the island will have to surrender.

Sept.29.1943. - The Armistice with Italy was signed on board the Nelson by General Eisenhower and Marshal Badoglio.

1944 - Refit - SW type 273 RDF has been added on the mainmast, SR type 284 on the forward 16" director, AR type 285 on the HA director and AW type 286 on the mastheads. An octuple pom-pom has been added on "B" turret and another pair on each side of the mainmast. About forty-four 20mm AA guns were dotted around the superstructure, including those replacing the single pom-poms, and this figure was later increased to sixty-five by pairing many of them. Radar has replaced the duties of the conning tower rangefinder, and this has been removed and a temporary structure for 20mm AA added. On each side of the bridge, two quadruple US pattern Bofors guns are fitted, for when she will be required in the far-east.

1944. Normandy -

Ships involved at Normandy. USS Arkansas, Georges, Leygues (Fr)  USS Nevada, HMS Dragon, Courbet (Fr), HMS Durban, HMS Undaunted, USS Texas, USS Augusta,  Wrestler, USS Kansas, HMS Emerald, Svenner (Nor), HMS Ramillies, HMS Scylla, HMS Onslow, Gentian Corvette, HMS Rodney, HMS Glasgow, HMS Onslaught, HMS Nelson, HMS Black Prince, HMS Swift, HMS Warspite. S class destroyer Svenner (ex HMS Shark) torpedoed by E-Boats 5-6 June. Courbet scuttled as part of Mulberry A 10/6/44. Cruisers HMS Dragon and HMS Durban used as part of the breakwater Wrestler mined 6th June and damaged irreparably. No carriers were involved in the D-Day operation, though naval aircraft took part. S class destroyer HMS Swift mined and sunk off Normandy beachhead June 24, 1944. HMS Onslaught sunk a German submarine.

Over 5,000 ships took part in operation Neptune, the Normandy landing. Six battleships, 23 cruisers, 104 destroyers, over 4,000 landing craft, 1,000 blockships and coasters, 224 merchantmen plus numerous smaller ships. 177 minesweepers swept channels for the invasion fleet and 53 old vessels were used to form breakwaters for the Mulberry harbours. Losses to the enemy amounted to less than 1% of overall tonnage a high number of losses would have been among the lighter landing craft. Another source puts the number of Battleships at 7, 2 monitors, 23 cruisers, 3 gunboats, 105 destroyers, plus 1,073 smaller naval craft.

Aug.15.1945 - After the war in the Far East was officially over on 15 August the main activity for both British fleets was to accept the Japanese surrender in the numerous islands and areas of coast were they had been in control. In many cases there was still the risk of continued resistance,  particularly in Malaya. On 27 August a British Task Group under Vice Ad. Walker in NELSON, with HMS CEYLON, the escort carriers HUNTER and ATTACKER, three destroyers and two LSI`s left Rangoon for Penang, arriving there the next day. On 2 September the Japanese surrendered the Penang area forces on board NELSON.

On 9 September Operation Zipper, the recapture of Malaya, was put into effect, but with out the previously arranged air and sea bombardment. Over 100,000 troops landed at various points escorted by NELSON, RICHELIEU, NIGERIA, CLEOPATRA, ROYALIST and CEYLON, with the escort carriers HUNTER, STALKER, ARCHER, KHEDIVE, EMPEROR, PURSUER and TRUMPETER with 15 destroyers. It was as well that no enemy resistance had to be coped with because conditions on the beaches were described as "chaotic". So ended Ceylon`s war. In the two years of her life she had steamed many thousands of miles but had always been based on her namesake island. In October she left the Far East to return to Portsmouth on the 25th and paid off into the Reserve Fleet.

September 1945 - LST 383 (landing ship tank) visited George Town, Penang. George Town was silted up and lst 383 was the only ship in the locale that was capable of reaching George Town. The 383 picked up personnel from the battleship HMS Nelson and took them to George Town where the crew of both, including my father Albert, witnessed the Japanese surrender of Penang. Les Sheen (crew member LST 383) recalls an interesting incident involving HMS Nelson when the 383 was probably responsible for causing the Nelson more damage than the combined forces of the enemy! When coming along side the Nelson, the 383 accidentally rammed into the Nelson. The Nelson crew member on watch shouted out  a few unsavoury comments about the abilities of the 383 and was subsequently court martialled for directing such comments at a more senior officer (the captain of the 383). As a result the Nelson crew member was busted down from Petty Officer to Able Seaman.

1946. - Training ship.

1947. - De-commissioned at Portsmouth.

3.15.1949. - Sold to Thomas Ward, Shipbreakers of Inverkeithing for scrap. As she lay in the Firth of Fort she was used as a target for bombing attacks by aircraft of the Fleet Air Arm. They dropped their bombs on a deserted, silent hulk.

1950. - Shipbreakers work complete.

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Nelson Specifications. Class (Nelson)   Sister ship (Rodney).

Builder:  Armstrong/Whitworth.           Laid down:  12.28.1923       Commissioned:  9.10.1927

Nicknames:  "Nellie" The most affectionate & popular.  "Nelsol" Because she and the Rodney (Rodnol) were thought to look like oilers or tankers. (There was a class of  fleet oilers whose names ended in OL. "Cherry Tree Class" Because she had been cut down by the Washington Treaty.

Cost:  £7,504.055           Estimated cost  today: £1,000 million

Displacement:  Standard tonnes   34,440,   Full load tonnes    38,610    

Dimensions: Length (pp)   660 feet,  (oa)  710 feet.   Beam - 106 feet.    Draught (max) - 31.5 feet

Armament.  As built 1945
Guns.
Main gun. 16inch (45 cal)      9 9  in three triple MKI turrets (forward))
Secondary gun. 6inch   (50 cal) 12  12  MKXXII in 6 dual MKXXVIII turrets.
4.7inch(40 cal)    6 6   QF MKVIII AA
4inch  - 8  i n four twin turrets.
2pdr  pompoms  MKII    - 16  light AA
40mm   - 16
20mm   oerlikons - 61
24inch torpedo tubes

Armour: Side (belt) 14inch.   Deck (middle) 3inch - 6.25inch.      Main Turrets 7inch - 16inch.     Barbettes  14inch - 15inch.     Secondary Turrets 1inch - 1.5inch.

Machinery: Boilers - Yarrow small tube No8.     Engines - Brown-Curtis single reduction geared turbines.    Shafts -  2

Total SHP: Designed - 45,000     Trials -  46,000        Fuel Capacity: Oil tonnes - 3,815

Performance: Designed speed -  23kts.     Trial speed  -  23.8kts.     Range - 16,500 miles  @12kts.

Crew: - 1,314

HMS Nelsons battle honours.

Malta convoys 1941-2   North Africa 1942-3   Sicily 1943   Salerno 1943   Mediterranean 1943   Normandy 1944

The Scrapping of HMS Nelson

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Probably the saddest photo's taken of the "Nelson". Here seen with her sister ship the "Rodney" and "Revenge". Inverkeithing at it's busiest.

24th May 1949.

Nelson arrives on 15th March 1949, to berth close to Revenge. Like Rodney, around 1500 tons had been removed at Rosyth to lighten her, including all 16-inch triple turrets, and her propellers.

Nelson being brought round from Rosyth to Inverkeithing on March 15 1949.

Note the 16" barrels have been cut down in size.

Nelson's 16-inch director control tower is toppled at Inverkeithing on 31st August 1949. Often awkward heavy items such as masts out of reach of the cranes were felled in this way, then cut up where they lay. Demolition was completed in October 1950, after 33,34 tons had been recovered.

Crew Photographs

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ALBERT (right) AND HIS COUSIN THOMAS KNIGHT

TAKEN IN MALTA, MAY 1945

THIS PHOTO WAS TAKEN IN THE "BLITZKRIEG BAR" NEW YORK JAN.1945. AFTER LEAVING NORMANDY IN 1944 HMS NELSON HIT A MINE ON THE STARBOARD SIDE CRACKING SOME ARMOUR PLATES. SHE SAILED TO PHILADELPHIA FOR REPAIRS, THEN WENT TO NEW YORK CITY TO PICK UP EVACUEES RETURNING HOME, INCLUDING LADY DILL WHOSE HUSBAND HAD DIED IN THE USA. THE CHAP IN THE MIDDLE OF THE PHOTO WAS A MERCHANT SEAMAN, THE OTHER THREE WERE SHIPMATES FROM LONDON. MY DAD CANT REMEMBER THEIR NAMES. MAYBE YOU CAN HELP.

 

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Bismarck Replies to HMS Hood by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £15.00
 The allied invasion of Normandy Operation Overlord was the greatest sea-bourne military operation in history. Key to its success and at the heart of the invasion were the Landings of the British 50th division on Gold beach and the Canadian 3rd Division on Juno beach. They provided a vital link between the landings of the British 3rd Division on Sword beach and the Americans on Omaha and Utah beaches. They were also crucial in securing the beachhead and the drive inland to Bayeux and Caen.
Glosters Return by David Griffin (Y)
Half Price! - £40.00
 HMS Thunderbolt by Ivan Berryman. The submarine HMS Thunderbolt moves away from the depot ship Montcalm.  Another submarine, HMS Swordfish is alongside for resupply.

HMS Thunderbolt by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - £450.00

 

MILITARY PRINTS

Click above to see all of our military art index - Eight random half price military items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Military Art Offers

 After a major victory at Salamanca (22 July 1812) Wellington occupied Madrid and then advanced to capture Burgos - unfortunately with insufficient siege equipment he was compelled to retire and forced to experience a harrowing retreat, it was, he said The worst scrape. However, when the campaigning season ended, Spain, south of the Tagus, was free of the French.

The Worst Scrape - Retreat from Burgos October/November 1812 by Chris Collingwood. (Y)
Half Price! - £50.00
DHM230.  The Dispatch by H Bellange.
The Dispatch by H Bellange.
Half Price! - £30.00
The Battle of Barnet was fought in a heavy mist, on Easter Sunday 14th April 1471. Due to a misalignment of the opposing armies, all became confusion. The centre of the battle (as depicted here) was fought at close quarters, a mass of struggling knights and men at arms with comrade fighting comrade, their vision of the battle obscured by mist. The Yorkists under the leadership of King Edward IV triumphed, leaving the Lancastrians with hopes dashed. Their champion and leader, the great Richard Neville, Earl of Warwick The King Maker lay dead, cut down while struggling to regain his charger. In the painting Edward IV charges toward the banner of Henry Holland, Duke of Exeter, while in the foreground soldiers of the Houses of York and Lancaster hack and slash at each other in terrified butchery.

Battle of Barnet by Chris Collingwood.
Half Price! - £90.00
 Panzer IVF2 tanks of 6th Panzer Division, Panzer Armee Hoth, attempt to fight their way through to the beleaguered Sixth Army at Stalingrad, 12th December 1942.  On the 21st the operation was abandoned when the expected breakout from Stalingrad failed to materialise, the relief column was only 25 miles from the city.

Operation Winter Tempest by David Pentland.
Half Price! - £90.00

 As Admiral Nelsons flagship leads the British fleet toward the Franco-Spanish line, Captain Harveys Temeraire tries to pass Victory in order to be the first to break the enemy column.

HMS Victory by Randall Wilson. (Y)
Half Price! - £65.00
 Study for the original painting Eve of Distinction.
John Chard, 1879 by Mark Churms. (P)
Half Price! - £120.00
 Camerons and Stuarts attack the centre and flank of Barrells Regiment (4th Foot) at the Battle of Culloden.

Broadsword Charge on Brown Bess by Chris Collingwood. (Y)
Half Price! - £70.00
  Trapped within a rapidly decreasing perimeter, the exhausted BEF along with elements of the French 1st Army appeared to be at the mercy of the mighty Luftwaffe.  No one though had reckoned on the brilliant leadership of Admiral Ramsay nor the gallant and unstinting efforts of the military and civilians who managed to rescue over 330,000 troops in nine days.

Operation Dynamo, Dunkirk, France 24th May - 4th June 1940 by David Pentland. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00

 

SPORT PRINTS

Click above to see all of our sport art index - Eight random half price sport items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Sport Art Offers

David Coulthard driving the 1998 McLaren MP4/13.

The Silver Arrow by Ray Goldsbrough
Half Price! - £20.00
DB006. Michael Schumacher by Darren Baker.
Michael Schumacher by Darren Baker.
Half Price! - £75.00
 Michael Schumacher celebrates another win for Ferrari.
Dream Team by Franklin.
Half Price! - £25.00
 Valentino Rossi at speed on his Repsol Honda.
Rossi at Speed by Derrick Mark.
Half Price! - £25.00

 2003 World Superbike Champion, Neil Hodgson with James Toseland in his slipstream.  British World Superbike - June 2003. 
Battle of Britain by Dave Foord.
Half Price! - £130.00
 Ralf Schumacher winning the first Grand Prix of his career in the Williams FW23. Ralf dominated the San Marino Grand Prix from the first corner to the chequered flag giving Williams its first win since 1997. History was made when the Schumachers became the first brothers in Formula 1 to win a Grand Prix. Imola April 2001.

The Italian Job by Michael Thompson
Half Price! - £75.00
B47. Eddie Irvine/ Ferrari F.310. by Ivan Berryman.

Eddie Irvine/ Ferrari F.310. by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £40.00
 England 53 - South Africa 3, Twickenham, Novermber 23rd 2002. England: Robinson, Cohen, Tindall, Greenwood, Christophers, Wilkinson, Dawson, Vickery, Leonard, Thompson, Johnson, Kay, Moody, Back, Hill. (Subs): Dallaglio, Gomersall, Healey, Morris, Regan, Stimpson. Scores: Try - Cohen, 2 Tries - Greenwood, Try - Back, Try - Hill, Try - Dallaglio, Penalty Try, 2 Penalties - Wilkinson, Conversion - Wilkinson, Conversion - Dawson, 2 Conversions - Gomersall, 2 Conversions - Stimpson. <br><br>South Africa: Greef, Paulse, Fleck, James, Lombard, Pretorius, Conradie, Roux, Dalton, Venter, Lambuschagne, Krige, Wannenburg, Van Niekerk. (Subs): Jacobs, Jordaan, Russell, Uys, Van Biljon, Van der Linde, Wentzel. Score : Penalty - Pretorius.

England v South Africa - Investec 2002 by Doug Harker. (Y)
Half Price! - £100.00

Everything we obtain for this site is shown on the site, we do not have any more photos, crew lists or further information on any of the ships.

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