Archer Class

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History of the third class cruisers of the Archer Class.

HMS Archer 23rd December 1885 Sold for scrap in 1905.
HMS Brisk 8th April 1886 Sold for scrap in 1905.
HMS Cossack 3rd June 1886 Sold for scrap in 1905.
HMS Mohawk 6th February 1886 Sold to breakers 1905.
HMS Porpoise 7th May 1886 Sold for scrap in 1905.
HMS Raccoon 6th May 1887 Sold for scrap in 1905.
HMS Serpent 10th March 1887 Wrecked on 10th November 1890.
HMS Tartar 28th October 1886 Sold for scrap in 1906.

HMS Archer

HMS Archer pictured pre 1896

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HMS Brisk

HMS Brisk, 1888.

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HMS Cossack

HMS Cossack a third-class cruiser which served in the China Sea

HMS Cossack, 1889.

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HMS Cossack - Name History

The third ?COSSACK? was a 6-gun twin-screw cruiser, launched at Clydebank in 1886.  She was of 1770 tons, 3500 horse-power, and 16.5 knots speed.  Her length, beam, and draught were 240 ft., 36ft., and 16ft.  In September 1890 nine German traders were murdered in Vitu, a small about 230 miles north of Zanzibar.  On October 24th the boats from the ?Cossack,? Commander J.M. McQuahe, and those from two other ships proceeded to Baltia and burned the village.  On October 26th a Naval Brigade of 700 seamen and marines was landed, under the personal command of Vice-Admiral the Hon.  Edmund Fremantle.  Meeting with some brisk resistance en route, the expedition captured the town of Vitu on October 27th.  The town and the sultan?s house were burned, and the brigade returned to their ships with 12 men wounded, and several cases of sunstroke.  From November 1902 to March 1903 the ?Cossack,? commanded by Commander Montagu G. Cartwright, was one of a squadron of six ships, under Rear-Admiral Sir Charles Drurywith his flag in ?Highflyer,? which took part in the Somaliland campaign in various coastal capacities.  The ships assisted in landing troops and stores, transport work, and in the prevention of delivery of munitions of war to the enemy.  In 1905 the ?Cossack? was sold.  

HMS Mohawk

Commander Nicholson and his crew on board HMS Cossack c.1900.

HMS Mohawk.

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HMS Porpoise

HMS Porpoise, 1888.

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HMS Raccoon

HMS Raccoon, 1888.

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HMS Serpent

HMS Serpent, 1888.

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HMS Tartar

Ambulance Drill on Board a Cruiser (HMS Tartar). (1896)

Our illustration represents bluejackets at ambulance drill, with imaginary wounded men on board the cruiser "Tartar".  Jack's repertory includes a general education in the arts of both land and sea fighting, and it stands to reason that so important a detail as the rendering of First Aid to the wounded is not omitted from his course of training.  With modern war, such as it is, ambulance drill is for him is the first importance.  As a fact, too, there is no better or more deft handed ambulance man than the sailor, or one more tender and kindly with the injured in his care.

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