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German U-Boats built for the Second World War from 1935 until 1945. Including U-Boat Histories, and Losses, during the battle of the Atlantic Naval enthusiasts notice boards available at bottom of page.

U570 after she had been captured by the British and renamed as HMS Graph. ©Tony Davies

Reproduction of this photo is available by permission of the owner, Photographic image size 10" x 7" approx , and mounted price £25 plus £3 post for UK £10 overseas, recorded airmail order photograph here

Name Launch Date Fate
U1 15th June 1935 Used for crew training from 1935 and was only put into action in March 1940. Patrolled off the coast of Norway until taken into Wilhelmshaven for work to be done. She was supposed to return to Norway but was lost en route.
U2 1st July 1935 Similar to U1, serving off Norway and returning to Wilhelmshaven for work. Resumed training duties in July 1940 but sank after colliding with a fishing boat.
U3 19th July 1935 Used for training crews but when war broke out she patrolled the North Sea. She sank 2 boats SS Vendia and SS Gun. Resumed training duties in July 1940. Given over to Allied countries after the war.
U4 31st July 1935 Used for training initially then patrolled the coast of Norway. She sank three boats SS Martti Ragnar, SS Walma and SS Gertrud Bratt. Joined 4th U-boat group and then sank submarine HMS Thistle. Given over to Allied countries after the war.
U5 14th August 1935 Used as a training boat initially. Patrolled Kattegat then took part in Operation Hartmut.  Joined 8th U-boat group. Resumed training duties in July 1940. 19th March 1943 accidental sinking with the loss of 20 crew plus the commander. 16 crew survived.
U6 21st August 1935 Used as a training boat initially. Patrolled Kattegat. Took part in Operation Hartmut. Joined 8th U-boat Group. Resumed training duties in July 1940. Given over to Allied countries after the war.
U7 29th June 1935 Patrolled Kattegat then went to Norwegian coast where she sank SS Akenside, SS Solaas & SS Takstaas on 22nd, 28th & 29th September 1939 respectively. Took part in Operation Harmut, joined 9th U-boat group. Resumed training duties in 1940 and was lost in a diving accident on 18th February 1944. No survivors.
U8 16th July 1935 Used as a training boat initially. Patrolled the Orkneys and Pentland Firth in May 1940. Resumed training duties in July 1940. Scuttled towards the end of the war.
U9 30th July 1935 Reconnaissance of Eastern Scotland with U19. Patrolling off Kinnairds Head on 18th January 1940 she sank first SS Flandria then SS Patria. Ordered to lay mines in Moray Firth from February 1940 resulting in the sinking of SS San Tiburcio. Sank SS Linda off the Orkneys on 11th Feb. Took part in Operation Hartmut. Patrolled Dutch & Belgian coastlines in May 1940, sinking SS Viiu, SS Tringa and SS Sigurds Faulbaums. Became a training boat and then joined 30th Flotille 1942-44. Sunk on 20th August 1944 by Soviet aircraft.
U10 13th August 1935 Used as a training boat initially. Patrolled North Sea and Orkneys in 1939. Back in the North Sea she sank SS Kvernaas and SS Ameland on 17th & 18th February 1940 respectively. Took part in Operation Hartmut. Resumed training duties in July 1940. Given to Allied countries after the war ended.
U11 27th August 1935 Used as a training boat initially and then used for tests returning to training school in March 1943. Scuttled on 3rd May 1945 and then scrapped.
U-Boats pictured c.1937 include U12, U15, U16 and U18.  © Tony Davies

Reproduction of this photo is available by permission of the owner, Photographic image size 10" x 7" approx , and mounted price £25 plus £3 post for UK £10 overseas, recorded airmail order photograph here

U12 11th September 1935 Patrolled east coast of England in August 1939, sinking only two months later after striking mines in the Straits of Dover. No survivors.
U13 9th November 1935 Patrolled the North Sea then laid mines off Orford Ness in September 1939. These mines resulted in the sinking of SS Magdapur, SS Phyrne on 10th & 24th September, damaged the SS City of Paris on 16th. Patrolled north east coast of Scotland then the Kinnairds Head area sinking SS Cairnmona on 30th October. Sank SS Start on 31st Jan 1940, then SS Fram on 1st Feb 1940. SS Anu was sunk on 6th Feb 1940 by mines laid by U13 in Firth of Tay. Took part in Operation Harmut. Sank SS Swainby on 16th April 1940. Sunk by depth charges from HMS Weston on 31st May 1940. Some Enigma instructions were recovered, all 26 crew picked up.
U14 28th December 1935 Patrolled off Polish coast. Reconnaissance of Scapa Flow and Orkneys in September 1939. Patrolled North Sea in January 1940 sinking SS Biarritz on 25th. Patrolled Kinnairds Head area in February 1940, sinking SS Sleipner on 15th and SS Rhone, SS Osmed & SS Liana on 16th. Patrolling near Zeeburgge she sank SS Vecht on 7th March 1940, the SS Borthwick, SS Abbotsford and SS Akeld on 9th. Took part in Operation Hartmut. Became training boat in July 1940. Scuttled on 5th May 1945.
U15 15th February 1936 Patrolled east coast of England in August 1939 and laid mines off Flamborough Head which sank SS Goodwood and SS Orsa. Patrolled the Channel in September 1939 and laid mines off Lowestoft in November. Sunk after being rammed by the German torpedo boat Iltis on 30/31 January 1940.
U16 28th April 1936 Laid mines in Tees Bay in September 1939 then patrolled Norwegian coast sinking SS Nyland on 28th September 1939. Laid mines off Dungeness on 22nd which sank fishing boat Sainte Clair in November. Heavily damaged by depth charges from HMS Puffin and HMS Caton Wyke near Goodwin Sands. She sank the next day with the loss of all hands.
U17 15th November1935 North Sea patrols in August 1939 laying mines off the south east coast of England. Patrolled Shetlands in January 1940 moving to the North Sea in February where she sank SS Rijnstroom on 2nd March. Two days later she sank SS Grutto. Patrolled Norwegian coast in April 1940 before becoming a training ship in May. Scuttled on 2nd March 1945.
U18 6th December 1935 Patrolled Polish waters in August 1939 then moved to the Great Belt in September  and then to the Orkneys in October. Patrolling Kinnairds Head area she sank the fishing boat Wigmore on 18th November 1939. Sank the SS Varild on 23rd January 1940. Patrolled Shetlands in February 1940. Became training ship in March 1940 until recommissioned in May 1943. Patrolled the Black Sea from May 1943-August 1944 possibly sinking 10 boats during this time. Scuttled in 1944, she was raised & repaired by the Russians and commissioned into the Russian Navy after the war ended.
U19 21st December 1935 Recon of North Sea then patrolled east coast of Scotland in August 1939. Mines laid near Inner Dowsing lightship on 17th October 1939. Three ships sunk SS Capitaine Edmond Laborie, MV Deodata and SS Konstantinos Hadjipateras on 21st, 21st and 24th respectively. Minelaying ops off east coast of England in November 1939 resulted in SS Carica Milica sinking on 18th. Patrolled northeast coast of Scotland sinking SS Manx on 9th January 1940. Sank SS Baltanglia & SS Pluto on 23rd January 1940 off Farne Islands and later on 25th the SS Louvain & SS Gudveig. Patrolling Shetlands in February she sank MV Daghestan on 20th. Sank SS Minsk and SS Charkow off the Moray Firth on 19th March 1940 and the next day SS Viking and SS Bothal. Took part in Operation Hartmut. Training duties from May 1940 until April 1942. Patrolled the Black Sea from January 1943 until September 1944. Sinking three ships. Scuttled on 10th September 1944.
U20 14th January 1936 Patrolled Norwegian coast and then off the Orkneys in September 1939. Mines laid on 21st November at Newarp Lightship resulted in the sinking SS Ionian & SS Willowpool. Sank SS Magnus on 9th December 1939 near Peterhead then SS Sylvia on 13th January 1940. Patrolling Orkneys she sank SS Faro, SS Fredensburg, SS England & SS Hosanger all on 27th January 1940. Sank SS Maria Rosa on 29th Feb & SS Mirella on 1st March near Lowestoft. Training ship from May 1940 until 27th May 1943. Patrolled Black Sea sinking seven boats. Scuttled on 10th September 1944.
U21 13th July 1936 Patrolling North Sea in August/September 1939. Mine laying in Rosyth on 4th November 1939 which sank HMS Bayonet and SS Royal Archer and damaged HMS Belfast. Patrolled Kinnairds Head in November 1939 and sank SS Arcturus on 1st December. Patrolling off Aberdeen she sank SS Mars and SS Carl Henkel on 21st December. Patrolling Orkneys & Kinnairds Head in January 1940, sinking SS Vidar on 31st near Pentland Firth, then SS Vid on 4th Feb. Diverted to Norwegian coast she ran aground near Kristiansand and her crew were interned until the German landings in Norway. Became training ship in July 1940 and scrapped after 1944.
U22 28th July 1936 Baltic patrols in August 1939 then to the Orkneys in September and sank SS Parkhill on 18th November 1939. Minelaying possibly near Blyth in December which sank SS Mars on 27th. HMS Loch Doon & SS Hanne were sunk on 25th & 28th December. SS Eston sank on 28th January 1940 after hitting the same mines. Patrolling Scottish coast she sank HMS Exmouth, in Moray Firth, and SS Tekla on 21st January. Ordered to Cape Lindesnes she sank en route possibly after striking a mine. No survivors.
U23 28th August 1936 Patrolled the North Sea and laid mines in Firth of Forth in September 1939. Patrolled Orkneys and sank SS Glen Farg on 4th October 1939. Laid mines in Cromarty Firth and Invergorden on 4th November. In December she patrolled the Shetlands sinking SS Scotia on 8th. Patrolled the Orkneys and Kinnairds Head sinking SS Fredville, MV Danmark & SS Bisp on 11th, 12th & 24th Jan 1940 respectively. She sank SS Tiberton, HMS Daring & SS Loch Maddy on 14th, 18th & 22nd Feb respectively. Became training ship in May 1940, then patrolled Black Sea from June 1943 - September 1944. During this time she sank 8 or more vessels. Scuttled on 10th September 1944.
U24 24th September 1936 Patrolled North Sea and laid mines off Hartlepool on 27th October 1939. SS Carmarthen sank due to these mines on 9th November. Patrolled Black Sea from October 1942 - August 1944 resulting in 9 ships being sunk. Scuttled on 25th August 1944, she was raised & repaired by the Russians and commissioned into the Russian Navy after the war ended. Scrapped in 1960.
U25 14th February 1936 Patrolled in Mediterranean and sank SS Baoule on 31st October 1939. Patrolling off Shetland in January 1940 she sank SS Polzella and SS Enid on 17th and MV Pajala on 18th. Moved south to Spanish & Portguese coasts sinking SS Songa en route on 22nd, then sank SS Armanistan on 3rd Feb near Lisbon. Sank MV Cahstine Maersk on 13th near Shetlands. Took part in Operation Hartmut. Joined 1st U-boat Group in April 1940. Moving to the Atlantic she sank HMS Scoutstoun on 13th June, then turned to the English Channel where she sank a tanker on 19th. En route to patrol west coast of Britain she struck mine and sank 3rd August 1940. No survivors. 
U26 14th March 1936 Minelaying operation off Portland in August 1939 which sank MV Alex van Opstal on 15th, SS Binnendijk on 8th October and SS Elena R on 22nd November 1939.Sent to lay mine sin Gib she was prevented by bright lights so patrolled the Med in October. Atlantic patrol in January 1940 sinking SS Nidarholm on 12th near Ireland ad SS Langleeford on 14th. On 14th February she sank SS Steinstad. Used for transporting arms and ammo to Trondheim in April 1940, she also sank MV Cedarbank on 21st near Alesund. Patrolled Bay of Biscay in June 1940 sinking SS Frangoula Goulandris, SS Belmoira & SS Merkur on 30th June 1940 near Fastnet. She located convoy OA 175 but was located by HMS Gladiolus & HMS Rochester and depth charged. Forced to surface she was then bombed by F/Lt W Gibson's Sunderland and scuttled on 1st July 1940. 39 survivors.
U27 24th June 1936 Atlantic patrol in August 1939. Sank fishing boats Davara & Rudyard Kipling on 13th and 16th September. Sunk by depth charges from HMS Fortune and HMS Forester on 20th September 1939. No casualties.
U28 14th July 1936 Atlantic patrol from August 1939 west of Ireland sinking MV Vancouver City on 14th September. Sank MV Sliedrecht on 17th November then SS Royston Grange on 25th. Laid mines near Swansea in December which sank SS Protesilaus on 21st Jan 1940. Patrolled English Channel in February 1940 and sank SS P Margaronis and MV Eulota on 9th and 11th March respectively. Atlantic patrol again in May 1940 then sank SS Sarmatia, SS Adamandios Georgandis and SS Prunella on 18th, 19th and 21st June. Patrolling off the Minch in August she sank SS Eva on 27th and SS Kyno on 28th. Sank SS Mardinian in convoy SC2 on 9th September and SS Maas in convoy OA210 on 11th. Became training ship in November 1940 and sank on 17th March 1944.
U29 29th August 1939 Atlantic patrol in August 1939 sinking MV Regent Tiger on 8th September. Neptunia sunk on 13th and MV British Influence on 14th. Scuttled on 4th May 1945. HMS Courageous was sunk on 17th September off Ireland - 518 crew died. Laid mines in Bristol Channel in February 1940 which sank SS Cato on 3rd March. SS Thurston and MV Pacific Reliance sunk on 4th March 1940. Used to transport small arms and ammo to Norway in April. 26th June she sank SS Dimitris and on 1st July sank SS Adamastos. SS Santa Margarita and MV Athellaird were sunk on 2nd July 1940. Patrolling west coast of Britain she sank SS Eurymedon on 25th September. Became training ship in January 1941 until scuttled on 4th May 1945.
U30 1936/37 Scuttled just before the war ended.
U31 1936/37 Lost sometime during the war.
U32 1936/37 Lost sometime during the war.
U33 1936/37 Lost sometime during the war.
U34 1936/37 Lost sometime during the war.
U35 1936/37 Lost sometime during the war.
U36 1936/37 Lost sometime during the war.
U56 1938/9 Lost at sea during the war.
U57 1938/9 Scuttled in May 1945.
U58 1938/9 Scuttled in May 1945.
U59 1938/9 Surrendered in May 1945.
U60 1938/9 Scuttled in May 1945.
U61 1938/9 Scuttled in May 1945.
U62 1938/9 Scuttled in May 1945.
U63 1938/9 Lost at sea during the war.
U93 launched 8th June 1940 Sunk By HMS Hesperus by depth charges 15th January 1941
U120 1940 Scuttled towards the end of the war.
U121 1940 Scuttled towards the end of the war.
U137 1940 Scuttled in May 1945.
U138 1940 Lost at sea during the war.
U139 1940 Scuttled in May 1945.
U140 1940 Scuttled in May 1945.
U141 1940 Scuttled in May 1945.
U142 1940 Scuttled in May 1945.
U143 1940 Surrendered in May 1945.
U144 1940 Lost at sea during the war.
U145 1940 Surrendered in May 1945.
U146 1940 Scuttled in May 1945.
U147 1940 Lost at sea during the war.
U148 1940 Scuttled in May 1945.
U149 1940 Surrendered in May 1945.
U150 1940 Surrendered in May 1945.
U151 1940 Scuttled in May 1945.
U152 1940 Scuttled in May 1945.

The Coning Tower of U-552.    Identified by Carl Proctor.  

U-552 returning from a patrol off the coast of America in 1942.   Wearing the white cap is Kapitanleutnant Topp.  Thanks to Carl Proctor for the image and the information

The Captain of a German U-Boat

Unknown U-boat.  If you have any information :  USE OUR MESSAGE FORM 

 
 

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AVIATION PRINTS

Click above to see all of our aviation art index - Eight random half price aviation items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Aviation Art Offers

 On Stalins personal orders, Petlyako PE-8 bombers, led by the hero of the Soviet Union, Major General Mikhal V. Vodopyanov, carry out their only raid on the German capital of Berlin.

Red Stars Over Berlin, 12th August 1941 by David Pentland.
Half Price! - £35.00
 Douglas C-47s of the 439th Troop Carrier Group, 94th Troop Carrier Squadron, approach the Drop Zone above Normandy on the night of 5th / 6th June 1944 at the start of Operation Overlord.

Drop Zone Ahead by Ivan Berryman.
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 USS Coral Sea (CV-43 being replenished by fast combat support ship USS Seattle (DE-3) as two of the carriers compliment of F.4s of VF-111 The Sundowners makes a low pass.

USS Coral Sea by Ivan Berryman (P)
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Depicting Mustang aircraft escorting Flying Fortresses on a bombing raid over Germany.

Guardian Angel by Anthony Saunders.
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 The Royal Air Force is currently the largest operator of the Boeing Chinook after the United States, this ubiquitous helicopter now equipping  No.s 7, 18 and 27 Sqn based at RAF Odiham.  Deployed in Afghanistan, the flight and ground crew operate jointly as the Expeditionary Chinook Engineering Squadron (ExCES), No.1310 Flight.  Here, a Chinook is depicted ferrying an underslung re-supply load out of Camp Bastion in Helmand Province, Afghanistan.

A Vital Role by Ivan Berryman. (P)
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 In a scene that was repeated almost daily throughout the long war years, the pilots of the 357th Fighter Group have returned from a gruelling mission to their base in Leiston, Suffolk. As they clamber out of their aircraft, all eyes are turned anxiously skyward, awaiting the return of the last man home.

Last Man Home by Nicolas Trudgian. (Y)
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It was during the inter-war period that a reawakening interest in twin engined fighter design prompted several countries to investigate a number of revolutionary concepts, of these only the Lockheeds sleek and unconventional P.38 was to be put into large scale production, proving to be a versatile and dominant fighter possessed of extremely long range, good speed and manoeuverability and a formidable armament. When production ceased in 1945, 9,923 examples of the P38 Lightning had been delivered.

Fork Tailed Devil (Lightning) by Ivan Berryman
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 Spitfire L1000 (DW-R) of No.610 Sqn is terminally damaged by an Me109 over Dunkirk on 29th May 1940.  The Spitfire pilot, Flying Officer Gerald Kerr is listed is missing after this combat.

Kerrs Last Combat by Ivan Berryman. (P)
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NAVAL PRINTS

Click above to see all of our naval art index - Eight random half price naval items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Naval Art Offers

 Just seconds from opening fire with a broadside that will devastate her opponent, HMS Victory prepares to pass the stern of the French flagship Bucentaure, closely followed by the three-deckers HMS Temeraire and HMS Neptune. With guns unable to bear on the enemy fleet during the slow approach the British ships had endured terrible punishment with Victorys sails holed, her wheel smashed and her mizzen top shot away.

Breaking the Line by Ivan Berryman. (Y)
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Captain Charles Vane was born in 1680, and was an English pirate who preyed upon English and French shipping.  Vane began piracy in 1716 and lasted 3 years. Vane captured a Barbados sloop and then a large 12-gun brigantine, which he renamed the Ranger.   Vane was among the pirate captains who operated out of the Bohama at the notorious base at New Providence after the colony had been abandoned by the British.  His pirate attacks made Captain Charles Vane well known to the Royal Navy and in February of 1718 Vincent Pearse, commander of HMS Phoenix cornered Vane on his ship the Lark.  Vane  had heard of the recent royal pardons that had been offered to pirates in exchange for a guarantee they would quit plundering, so Vane claimed he had actually been en route to surrender to Pearse and accepted the pardon on the spot,  Charle Vane gained his freedom but as soon as he was free of Pearse he ignored the pardon and resumed his pirate ways.  Charles Vane was again captured and in 1721 was executed by hanging at Gallows Point, Port Royal, Jamaica on March 29th 1721.

Captain Charles Vane by Chris Collingwood. (Y)
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 Blackbeard the Terrible, otherwise known as Edward Teach, Thatch or Drummond. Circa 1718.

Damnation Seize My Soul by Chris Collingwood. (Y)
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With her mizzen top already gone and her sails aloft having received severe punishment, Victory breaks through the line behind the French flagship Bucentaure, delivering a shattering broadside into her stern.  So severe was this opening fire that the Bucentaure was effectively put out of the rest of the battle, although Admiral Villeneuve himself was to miraculously survive the carnage.  Beyong Victory can be seen the French Redoubtable, which is receiving fire from Victorys starboard guns, and the Spanish San Leandro is in the extreme distance.  Most of Victorys stunsails have been cut away, but it was her stunsail booms that became entangled with the rigging of the Redoubtable when she put her helm to port and ran onto her.  Admiral Nelson fell shortly afterward, having received a fatal wound from a musket ball fired by a French sharpshooter in Redoubtables mizzen fighting top.  The Temeraire can be seen approaching the fray to the right.

Trafalgar - The Destruction of the Bucentaure by Ivan Berryman.
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The moment shortly after dawn on 24th May 1941 when HMS Hood, in company with HMS Prince of Wales, opens fire on the Bismarck, setting in motion one of the greatest sea dramas the world had seen.

HMS Hood Engages Bismarck by Ivan Berryman (AP)
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B146.  HMS Jamaica by Ivan Berryman.

HMS Jamaica by Ivan Berryman.
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 A splendid little war was how John Hay, ambassador to Britain, described the Spanish-American war of 1898. Though the war was small in scope it was large in consequences; it promoted the regeneration of the American Navy and the emergence of the United States as a major world power. Fought primarily at sea, the war created an American naval legend in its opening encounter between the pacific squadrons of Spain and the United States at Manila Bay on the 1st of May 1898. At sunrise Admiral Dewey, leading the American fleet in his flagship the USS Olympia, had caught the Spanish fleet, under Admiral Patricio Montojo, by surprise - still anchored off Sangley Point at Manila Bay in the Philippine Islands. Defeat for the Spanish was total and heralded the end of a once extensive Spanish empire in the Americas. Montojos flagship, Reina Cristina, is seen here under fire from the Olympia.

The Battle of Manila Bay by Anthony Saunders (Y)
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 The Dido class cruiser HMS Naiad is pictured together with the cruiser HMS Leander during the encounter with the French Guepard in 1941 whilst they were both engaged in operations against the Vichy-French forces in Syria.

HMS Naiad by Ivan Berryman (P)
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MILITARY PRINTS

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DHM805.  Episode during the Siege of Paris by E Detaille.
Episode during the Siege of Paris by Edouard Detaille.
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 William F Cody (Buffalo Bill) is shown as an Army Scout during a skirmish with Indians on the Frontier. 

Buffalo Bill by Brian Palmer.
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Driven by revenge for the brutal treatment she had suffered at the hands of the Romans, Queen Boadicea led the Iceni and her allies the Trinovantas in open revolt. The IX Legion Hispania was despatched to suppress the insurrection but were ambushed en route. Only the commander Petilius Cerealis, and a handful of cavalry escaped.

Ambush of the XI Legion by Brian Palmer.
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 Robert the Bruces Scots army stand fast as the English knights attack. Robert the Bruce succeeds in defeating the English army at Stirling.  With the full might of Englands army gathered before the besieged Stirling Castle, Edward II Plantagenate is confident of victory. To the west of Bannockburn, Robert Bruce, King of Scots, kneels to pray with his men and commends his soul to God.  Patiently awaiting the coming onslaught in tightly packed schiltroms, his spearmen and archers are well prepared for battle. Unknown to the English, the open marsh of no mans land conceals hidden pits and calthrops, major obstacles for any mounted charge. Despite Cliffords and Beaumonts premature and unsuccessful attempt to relieve Stirling the day before, years of victory have caused the brave English knights to regard their Scottish foes with contempt. So, without waiting for the flower of the forest (archers) to weaken the enemy formations, the order is hurriedly given to attack! With one rush, hundreds of mounted knights led by the impetuous Earl of Gloucester, thunder headlong through the boggy ground straight for the impenetrable mass of spears, hurling themselves into defeat and death. With dash and courage the knights try to force a way through but the infantry stand firm. There is no room to manoeuvre. Everywhere horses and men crash to the ground. Casualties amongst the English nobility are horrific. Bruce seizes the moment and orders the exultant army to advance. The English recoil and are pushed back into the waters of the Bannockburn where many perish in the crush to escape the deadly melee. Edward II, his army destroyed, flees with his bodyguard for the safety of the castle but is refused refuge and has to fight his way south to England. For Robert Bruce and Scotland, victory is complete.

The Battle of Bannockburn by Brian Palmer.
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 Icy rain adds its misery to the bitter conflict on Drumossie Moor. In the shadow of the Black Isle, two English ships on the waters of the Moray Firth, await the outcome of the decisive battle. Pounded by Cumberlands gunners and raked by steady musketry, the Princes brave men can make no headway. Although the Irish and French regulars refuse to give ground, the Jacobite lines gradually disintegrate. Tired, cold and hungry men flea past Culloden House for the relative safety of Inverness. On the Scottish right the Argyll Militia, supported by Hawleys Dragoons, tear down the walls of the Culwiniac and Culchunaig enclosures in an outflanking attack. Avochies men offer some resistance but Major Gillies McBean stands alone on the breach. He cuts down more than a dozen Argylls, including Lord Robert Kerr, who lies mortally wounded, but his foes are too many. The hero eventually falls to a vicious cut to the forehead, his thigh bone is also broken. Despite the cries of a mounted officer to save that brave man, the major is ruthlessly bayonetted, his back against the wall. The victory is complete and nothing more can be done. In the distance, the Young Pretender is forced to abandon the field and Scotlands hope of claiming the British Throne.

Battle of Culloden by Mark Churms. (Y)
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 Study for the original painting Assault on the Breach of San Sebastian.
San Sebastian - Ensign Figure Study by Mark Churms. (P)
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 Depicting troopers of the 2nd Royal North British Dragoons (Scots Greys) on the morning of 18th June 1815. before the Battle of waterloo, and their great charge into history.

The Dawn of Waterloo by Lady Elizabeth Butler. (Y)
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Battle of Crecy.  One of the battles fought during the Hundred Years War, on 26th August 1346. On 12th July Edward III landed in Normandy with his army and marching north plundered the countryside. King Philip VI assembled an army to stop Edward and tracked them across the Somme River. When Edward reached Crecy he stopped and ordered his army to take up defensive positions. King Philip surveyed the English positions and decided to postpone his attack until August 27th. However, the French vanguard pressed forward too far and so committed the entire army to the battle. The hired Genoese crossbowmen began the assault but came under severe attack from the English longbows and so fled to the rear. King Philip then ordered his cavalry to charge resulting in a huge loss of horse and man under the barrage of arrows which rained down on them. By the end of the night after several unsuccessful assaults the French army was reduced by a third and King John of Luxemburg was dead. Edward then turned towards Calais.

The Black Prince Before the Battle of Crecy by Mark Churms.
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SPORT PRINTS

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B50. Jean Alesi/ Ferrari 412 by Ivan Berryman.

Jean Alesi/ Ferrari 412 by Ivan Berryman.
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 Michael Schumacher wins again!

From Pole to Flag by Graham Bosworth
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 Jacques Villeneuve.

The Maple Leaf Maestro by Stuart Coffield
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Europe 18.5 - 9.5 USA.  The K Club, Straffan, Co. Kildare, Ireland, 22-24 September 2006. <br><br>Europe; Ian Woosnam - captain - Colin Montgomerie, Darren Clarke, Luke Donald, David Howell, Sergio Garcia, Paul McGinley, Lee Westwood, Paul Casey, Jose Maria Olazabel, Robert Karlsson, Padraig Harrington, Henrik Stenson. <br><br>USA; Tom Lehman - captain - Tiger Woods, Phil Mickelson, JJ Henry, David Tomms, Brett Wetterick, Stewart Cink, Jim Furyk, Chad Campbell, Chris DiMarco, Vaughan Taylor, Zach Johnson, Scott Verplank.
36th Ryder Cup 2006 by James Owen.
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Unarguably the most famous Flying Finn of the past years has been Mika Häkkinen who won the F1 championship twice 1998-1999 and also raced in DTM between 2005 and 2007.

The Flying Finn by Ray Goldsbrough
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 Jimmys total of 516 league appearances produced an amazing 357 goals.

Greavsie by Gary Keane.
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B42. Gerhard Berger/ Ferrari 412.T2 by Ivan Berryman.

Gerhard Berger/ Ferrari 412.T2 by Ivan Berryman.
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Beckhams Golden Generation by Darren Baker. (Y)
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Everything we obtain for this site is shown on the site, we do not have any more photos, crew lists or further information on any of the ships.

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