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HMS Neptune 

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Battleship histories. Royal naval battleship HMS Neptune. Battleship website dedicated to the history of HMS Neptune from its launch to its participation in major wars also notice board for Naval Enthusiasts and historians and descendants of crew of HMS Neptune.

HMS Neptune

Built at Portsmouth navy Dockyard and launched on the 30th September 1909. HMS Neptune was the first British Battleship to be able to fire all ten of her 12-inch guns broadside, by allowing the two wing turrets to fire across deck. But this was found to be of little advantage as it strained the hull.  HMS Neptune also failed to reach her contractual speed on trials, but did achieve (using Welsh coal ) a speed of 21.129 knots during her acceptance trials on the 17th November 1910. In May 1911 HMS Neptune became the flagship of the Commander-in-Chief of the Home Fleet and in May 1912 she joined the 1st Battle Squadron. She was still serving in this squadron when in April 1916 she collided with a merchant ship but was not seriously damaged. She was at the Battle of Jutland and was reported to have scored several hits on the German Battleship Lutzow. She did not have any casualties during the action.  On the 1st of February she was put into reserve and eventually scrapped in September 1922.

Displacement: 19,680 tons.   Speed: 21 knots.   Armament: Ten 12 inch guns in pairs, twenty 4 inch guns, four 3pdr guns, three 18 inch guns and 3 torpedo tubes.   Compliment: 759.

HMS Neptune, 1911.

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HMS Neptune, with others, November 1918.

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HMS Neptune.

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HMS Neptune.

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The 12 inch guns of HMS Neptune in action

HMS Neptune pictured just before the outbreak of World War I.

HMS Neptune

HMS Neptune

HMS Neptune.

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HMS Neptune.

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HMS Neptune.

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HMS Neptune.

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HMS Neptune.

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HMS Neptune, 1911.

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AVIATION PRINTS

Click above to see all of our aviation art index - Eight random half price aviation items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Aviation Art Offers

 Wing Commander J R Baldwin is depicted flying Typhoon MN934 whilst commanding 146 Wing, 84 Group operating from Needs Oar Point in 1944, en route to a bombing raid on 20th June with other Typhoons of 257 Sqn in which both ends of a railway tunnel full of German supplies were successfully sealed.

Typhoons Over Normandy by Ivan Berryman. (AP)
Half Price! - £90.00
 On the night of 7th-8th June 1944, a Lancaster of No.207 Sqn piloted by Wing Commander John Grey was part of a force of 112 bombers and 10 Mosquitoes sent to attack a tank storage park near Cerisy-la-Foret. With the D-Day landings just 48 hours old, it was considered too risky to leave the tank park intact, should the Germans try to launch a counter thrust from this position, just 20 miles from the French coast near Bayeux. Shortly after crossing the coast, Greys aircraft was attacked by a JU.88 and both the mid upper gunner Sutherland and tail gunner McIntosh opened fire on their pursuer and sent it down in flames. No sooner had they recovered from this fright when a second JU.88 closed in on them. Again, both gunners combined their fire and destroyed the enemy aircraft in mid air. Grey pressed on to the target where their bombs fell on the enemy tank depot, also destroying some fuel dumps and an important road junction. Returning to the French coast to begin their journey home, they were attacked yet again, this time by a Messerschmitt Bf 110. With machine-like precision, McIntosh and Sutherland opened fire together, claiming their third victim in a single night. For this extraordinary feat, both gunners were awarded the DFC.

Gunners Moon by Ivan Berryman.
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 Focke-Wulf FW.190A-5/U8 of 1 Gruppe, Schnellkampfgeschwader 10 in 1943. All national markings were painted out, except for the call sign C on the fuselage and repeated, crudely sprayed, on the engine cowling.

Focke-Wulf Fw190A-5/U8 by Ivan Berryman. (C)
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 A tribute to the glider crews and airborne troops who participated in the glider operations during D-Day.  The British Horsa glider (known as the flying coffin) was used by British, Canadian and American airborne forces during the invasion.  Approximately 100 glider pilots were killed or wounded during the D-Day operations.

D-Day Invasion : Tribute to the Glider Troops by Ivan Berryman. (P)
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 Just as the name Zeppelin had become the common term for almost every German airship that ventured over Britain, so the name Gotha became generically used for the enemy bombers that droned across the English Channel during 1917-1918, inflicting considerable damage to coastal ports and the capital. As the massed raids of Bombengeschwader 3 increased, a public inquiry in England brought about the formation of the Royal Air Force as an independent service to counter this new threat and fighters from Europe were brought home to defend against these marauding giants. As a result, heavy losses on the German side meant that daylight raids had to be abandoned and all operations were henceforth conducted by night. Here, a pair of Gotha G.Vs begin to turn for home as searchlights play fruitlessly over distant fires, the grim result of another successful nights work.

Gothas Moon by Ivan Berryman.
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 Major Hans-Ekkehard Bob is shown claiming his 5th victory – a Blenheim – 60km west of Rotterdam on 26th June 1940.  Bob went on to serve with JG.54, JG.51, JG.3, EJG2.2 and JV.44, scoring a total of 60 confirmed victories in the course of his Luftwaffe service.  The Blenheim claimed as his 5th victory is likely to have been R3776 of No.110 Squadron, which was the only Blenheim recorded to have been lost participating in Operation Soest on that day - while another returned to base damaged and crash landed.  The three crew of the Blenheim were all missing in action - P/O Cyril Ray Worboys, Sgt Gerald Patterson Gainsford and Sgt Kenneth Cooper.

Ltn. Hans-Ekkehard Bob of JG21 Becomes an Ace by Ivan Berryman.
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 Fokker DR.1 Triplane 425/17 of Manfred von Richthofen, accompanied by a Fokker. D.VII wingman, swoops from a high patrol early in 1918. 425/17 was the aircraft in which the Red Baron finally met his end in April of that year, no fewer than 17 of his victories having been scored in his red-painted triplane.

Final Days by Ivan Berryman. (P)
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 P51D of Colonel Glenn Duncan C.O. of the 353rd Fighter Group, along with Betty-E flown by Lt. Colonel Wayne Blickenstaff, taking off on one of their last missions of the war, April 1945.

Dove of Peace by David Pentland.
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NAVAL PRINTS

Click above to see all of our naval art index - Eight random half price naval items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Naval Art Offers

 HMS Medway was the first Royal navy submarine Depot ship that was designed for the purpose from the outset. She is shown here with a quintet of T-class submarines on her starboard side, whilst an elderly L-Class begins  to move away having completed replenishment. HMS Medway was sunk on 30th June 1940 having been torpedoed by U-372 off Alexandria.

HMS Medway by Ivan Berryman
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Captain Morgan by Chris Collingwood (Y)
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 The Dido class cruiser HMS Naiad is pictured together with the cruiser HMS Leander during the encounter with the French Guepard in 1941 whilst they were both engaged in operations against the Vichy-French forces in Syria.

HMS Naiad by Ivan Berryman (P)
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Erich Topps notorious Red Devil Boat, U-552, slips quietly away from the scene of another victory in the North Atlantic in 1941.

U-552 by Ivan Berryman. (P)
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 Having played a vital part in the battle for the Mediterranean for over two years, HMS Ark Royal finally succumbed to a U-Boats torpedo in November 1941. She is shown here with a pair of Swordfish Mk1s of 821 Sqn ranged on the deck, passing the cruiser HMS Sheffield off the Mole, Gibraltar, earlier that same year.

HMS Ark Royal and HMS Sheffield off the Mole, Gibraltar by Ivan Berryman (Y)
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 Developed from the Supermarine Seagull, the Walrus was to prove itself a useful and capable workhorse in almost every theatre of the Second World War. Here, HMS Rodney despatches her Shagbat from the catapult atop C turret.

Ships Company by Ivan Berryman (Y)
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 The Last of the heavy Cruisers built by Germany (5 in total) The picture shows Admiral Hipper making her first sortie on the 18th February 1940, accompanied by the Scharnhorst and the Gneisenau on Operation Nordmark. (Search for allied convoys on the route between Britain and Norway)

The Narvik Squadron by Anthony Saunders. (Y)
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 HMS Broadsword and the aircraft carrier Hermes battle their way through the storm on their way to the Battle for the Falklands.

Storm Force to the Falklands by Anthony Saunders (Y)
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MILITARY PRINTS

Click above to see all of our military art index - Eight random half price military items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Military Art Offers

 The execution of Charles I, January 30th, 1649.
Whitehall by Ernest Crofts. (Y)
Half Price! - £25.00
 German forces encircled in the fortress town of Konigsberg by 3rd Ukranian front prepare to break through the besieging Soviet lines to re-establish a supply line to the Baltic. Here some Stug III assault guns move up to their assembly area next to the towns World War One memorial. From here the attack was launched on February 18th 1945 and successfully opened a supply corridor which remained in place until 8th April.

Counter Attack at Konigsberg by David Pentland. (B)
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 British infantry supported by Warrior armoured vehicles advance into Iraq, February 1991.

The Storm and the Sabre by Simon Smith.
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 Displaying the captured standards from the Battles of Austerlitz and Ulm through the streets of Paris.
Remise Au Senat Des Trophees by Edouard Detaille. (Y)
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 Towards the end of the second battle of Cambrai, British Mark IV tanks of 12th Battalion confronted German captured Mark IVs. The ensuing battle was chaotic, emerging from smoke the Germans were initially mistaken as part of C Company, but at 50 meters both sides recovered from their surprise and opened fire simultaneously. The lead British tank L16 commanded by Captain Rowe was immediately knocked out, who escaped with his men to L19 just in time to see it destroyed, along with L12. The remaining tank L8 had broken down some distance back taking no part in the battle, although its commander Lieutenant Martel managed to use a captured 77mm artillery piece to finally halt the German tank.

Unexpected encounter at Niergnies, France, 8th October 1918 by David Pentland. (GL)
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 Showing William III in full Black Armour at the time of the Battle of Boyne.

William III by Chris Collingwood. (Y)
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English soldiers search a blacksmiths hunting for highlanders who fled from after the battle of Culloden.
After Culloden, Rebel Hunting by J.S. Lucas.
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 Vielsalm, Belgium, 22nd December 1944.  Men of the 508th PIR, along with the rest of the 82nd Airborne Division were rushed to the Ardennes and deployed in an attempt to halt the onslaught of 6th SS Panzer Army, specifically Kampfgruppe Peiper.

Holding the Line by David Pentland.
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SPORT PRINTS

Click above to see all of our sport art index - Eight random half price sport items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Sport Art Offers

Race horses gallop to the finish shown in this racing painting by Mark Churms.

The Finish by Mark Churms.
Half Price! - £20.00
This montage shows Trigger winning the Goodwood Cup in 1995, 1997 and 1998.

Double Trigger by Stephen Smith.
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B48. Michael Schumacher/ Ferrari F.310 by Ivan Berryman

Michael Schumacher/ Ferrari F.310 by Ivan Berryman
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 The Intercontinental Formula was first organised by British Racing Drivers Club to allow the racing of cars with 2000cc to 3000cc engines. At the time the 1500cc limit of Formula 1 had been instituted by the international ruling body in the belief that the smaller cars would mean safer racing. In reality this meant that the relatively easy to handle Formula 1 cars could be driven by less experienced drivers almost as fast as the most experienced master drivers. The result was that the car with fractionally more power was the deciding factor in winning the race, rather than the better driver but this also compromised track safety. The introduction of the Intercontinental Formula was seen as more of a challenge for the drivers, with the larger and more powerful cars requiring greater skill and experience than to drive the 1500cc cars of Formula 1. The 13th International Trophy on Saturday 6th May 1961 was the first race of the season to carry World Championship points and consisted of 80 laps of Silverstone, a total of 233 miles. Stirling Moss, having already won the International Sports Car Race in a Lotus earlier that day, was driving Rob Walkers 2.5 litre Cooper Climax and qualified 2nd on the grid despite being unhappy with the steering of his car. The starting grid front row was Bruce McLaren, Stirling Moss, Jack Brabham and Graham Hill and by the time the race started at 2.30pm a heavy rain meant that the track was not only soaked but also covered in oil and rubber from the previous races. World Champion Jack Brabham made a superb start, passed Moss and was first into Copse and by lap 4 Moss was in 3rd place led by Surtees and Brabham. Due to appalling conditions and poor visibility many of the cars were spinning or leaving the track and by lap 13 Brabham and Moss were 1st and 2nd with the rest of the field some distance behind. Moss now poured on the pressure and for the next few laps he tried to pass as he harried Brabham in a duel for the lead. The pair were now beginning to lap the tailenders and, at around a quarter of the distance Moss was held up by Flockhart, Brabhams team member, who had allowed Brabham to pass. Moss gestured angrily to Flockhart as he was unable to follow Brabham and, as the rain paused for a while the pace became faster. Suddenly and quite dramatically Moss passed both Flockhart and Brabham and within 2 laps had gained 5 seconds on the World Champion. As the rain returned in a deluge Moss mercilessly pushed on, increasing his lead to 1.5 minutes by the halfway mark. Although he could have taken things easily at this point Moss drove on relentlessly at a seemingly impossible pace and was now lapping most of the field for a second time. By the ¾ stage he completed his humiliation of Brabham by passing him for a second time to lap him representing a 3 mile lead. Moss eventually won the race in 2hrs 41 mins 19.2 secs, 1.5 laps ahead of Brabham and at least two laps ahead of the rest of the field in what were treacherous conditions. At the end of the race Moss summed up the experience as a nice ride, having proved himself to be one of the greatest and fastest drivers in the world under any conditions. Sir Stirling Moss believes this to be one of his finest ever drives.

A Moment of Triumph by Gerald Coulson. (Y)
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B43. Damon Hill/ Williams Renault FW.18 by Ivan Berryman

Damon Hill/ Williams Renault FW.18 by Ivan Berryman
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 Rothmans Williams Renault FW18.  World Champion 1996.
Damon Hill by Michael Thompson.
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David Coulthard driving the 1998 McLaren MP4/13.

The Silver Arrow by Ray Goldsbrough
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Neil Hodgson puts in 100% to achieve Pole Position, his 1st Double Win, the 1st Win for the Ducati 999 and the race and lap record at Valencia, March 2003.
One Hundred Percent by Dave Foord.
Half Price! - £130.00

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