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Ship Name Histories - Database of histories of ship names beginning with letter G.

HMS Ganges

The fifth ?GANGES? was a hired armed transport, used during the war with Russia.  On November the 14th, 1854, a tremendous hurricane devastated the coasts of the Crimea, and the ?Ganges? was one of five British transports which were totally lost.   The sixth ?GANGES? was an 8-gun screw corvette, which was launched in1882 as the ?Caroline.?  She was of 1420 tons, 1400 horse-power, and 13 knots speed.  Her length, beam, and draught were 200ft., 38ft., and 14ft. This vessel acted for some years in training establishment for boys at Shotley, and was used as a swimming bath.The seventh ?GANGES? known as ?Ganges 2nd.? For some time, was a screw 17-gun ship which had been launched at Blackwall in 1863 as the ?Minotaur.?  She was of 10,690 tons, and her length, beam, and draught were 400ft., 59ft., and 27ft.  After service as a training-ship for youths at Portland and Harwich, she became part of the training establishment for boys at shotley.

HMS Gibraltar

The eighth ?GIBRALTAR? was an 101-gun screw ship, launched at Devonport in 1860.  She was of 5724 tons, 800 horse- power, and carried a crew of 700 men.  Her length, beam, and draught were 252ft., 58ft., and 20ft.  The ?Gibraltar? ended her career in the service of the Belfast training-ship committee, and her name was changed to ?Grampian? in 1888.  In 1899 this vessel was sold. The ninth ?GIBRALTAR? is a 12-gun twin-screw cruiser, launched at Glasgow in 1892.  She is of 7700 tons, 12,000 horse- power, and 19.7 knots speed.  Her length, beam, and draught are 360ft., 60ft., and 24ft.   In 1896 the ?Gibraltar,? commanded by Captain Harry Hughes Hallet, was one of a squadron of six ships which was specially commissioned in consequence of a congratulatory telegram from the German Emperor to President Paul Kruger on the occasion of the Repulse of Dr. Jameson?s Raid.  The ships were called the Particular Service squadron, and were commanded by Rear-Admiral Alfred Taylor Dale, with his flag in ?Revenge.?

HMS Glasgow

The fifth ?GLASGOW? was a 51-gun screw frigate, launched at Portsmouth in 1816.  She was of 4020 tons, 2020 horse- power, and 12 knots speed.  Her length, beam, and draught were 250ft., 52ft., and 22ft.  She did only one commission from 1871 to 1875.  When Lord Mayo, the Viceroy of India, was assassinated on February 8th, 1872, at the Andaman Islands, the ?Glasgow? was in attendance and removed the body.  She presented a melancholy sight as she steamed away, with her yards a-cockbill, her gaff drooped, and the Vice-Regal flag at half-mast.  In 1884 this ship was sold. The sixth ?GLASGOW? is a turbine cruiser, launched at Fairfield?s Yard in 1910.  She is of 4800 tons, 22,000 horse- power, and 25 knots speed.  Her length, beam, and draught are 430ft., 47ft., and 15ft.

HMS Glory

The seventh ?GLORY? was a 58-ton vessel with a crew of 4 men, hired for service in 1804.  The eighth ?GLORY? was the French 40-gun frigate ?Gloire.?  She was of 1153 tons, and carried a crew of 284 men.  Her length, beam, and draught were 158ft., 41ft., and 12ft.  She was captured on September 25th, 1806, off Rochefort by the ?Centaur,? Commodore Sir Samuel Hood, and the ?Mars,? commanded by Captain William Lukin.  In 1809 the ?Glory,? commanded by Captain James Carthew, was one of a fleet of 44 vessels in all, commanded by Rear-Admiral the Hon.  Alexander Cochrane with his flag in ?Neptune.?  On January 28th they sailed from Barbados to attack Martinique.  Ten thousand troops under Lieutenant-General Beckwith accompanied the expedition, and were landed on January 30th.  The ?Glory?  and other ships forced their way up to the head of  Fort Royal Bay and compelled the French to burn their ships.  Seamen landed and assisted with guns and mortars.  The forts were bombarded by the ships and attacked by the troops, and the whole island capitulated on February 24th.  The Navy lost 8 killed and 19 wounded.    In 1812 the ?Glory? was broken up at Chatham.The ninth ?GLORY? was a French 40-gun frigate ?Iphigenie.?  She was taken on January 16th, 1814, off Madeira by the ?Venerable? and ?Cyane.?  She was added to the Navy, and her name was subsequently changed to ?Gloire.?  She was of 1066 tons, and carried a crew of 315 men.  Her length, beam, and draught were 154ft., 40ft., and 11ft. In 1817 this vessel was sold for ?1750. The tenth ?GLORY? is a 16-gun twin-screw battleship, launched at Birkenhead in 1899.  She is of 12,950 tons, 13,500 horse- power, and 18 knots speed.  Her length, beam, and draught are 390ft., 74ft., and 26ft.

HMS Gloucester

The sixth ?GLOUCESTER? was a 74-gun ship, launched at Northfleet in 1812.  She was of 1770 tons, and carried a crew of 590 men.  Her length, beam, and draught were 176ft., 48ft., and 17ft.   In 1832 the ?Gloucester? was cut down to a 50-gun ship at Chatham.  The ?Gloucester? ended her career as a receiving hulk at Chatham, and was sold in 1884.The seventh ?GLOUCESTER? was a 10-gun brig which took part in the American War, in the Lake Campaign on Lake Ontario. In April 1813 she was captured by the Americans when they attacked York and carried off to their headquarters at Sackett?s Harbour.    In May the British, under Captain Sir James Lucas Yeo, attacked Sackett?s Harbour, and although they suffered a serious repulse, they succeeded in burning the ?Gloucester? before they retired.  The eighth ?GLOUCESTER? is a turbine cruiser, launched at Beardmore?s Yard in 1910.  She is of 4800 tons, 22,000 horse- power, and 25 knot speed.  Her length, beam, and draught are 430ft., 47ft., and 15ft.    In August 1914, after the declaration with war with Germany, the ?Gloucester,? commanded by Captain W.A.H. Kelly, had an indecisive and distant engagement with the German cruiser ?Breslau? between Sicily and the Dardanelles.  The ?Gloucester? subsequently took part in the various operations in the Mediterranean against the German and Austrian fleets.

HMS Goliath

The second ?GOLIATH? was an 84-gun ship, eventually launched at Pembroke in July 1827 as 2Clarence.?  She was of 2288 tons, and carried a crew of 700 men.  Her length, beam, and draught were 196ft., 52ft., and 19ft.   The Lord High Admiral himself attended the launch, and gave her his own name of ?Clarence.?The third ?GOLIATH? was an 80-gun ship, launched at Chatham in 1842.  She was of 2596 tons, and carried a crew of 630 men.  Her length, beam, and draught were 190ft., 57ft., and 18ft.   In 1856 the ?Goliath? was fitted with a screw and engines of 400 horse- power.  This vessel was subsequently lent to the Forest Gat School Ship Committee, and while lying at her moorings, was burned at Grays on December 22nd, 1875. The fourth ?GOLIATH? is a 16-gun twin-screw battleship, launched at Chatham in 1898.  She is of 12,950 tons, 13,500 horse- power, and 18 knots speed.  Her length, beam, and draught are 390ft., 74ft., and 26ft.  In 1900 the ?Goliath? commanded by Captain Lewis Edmund Wintz, played a minor part in the China War or ?Boxer Riots.?

HMS Good Hope

The second ?GOOD HOPE? is an 18-gun twin-screw cruiser, launched at Fairfield in 1901.  She is of 14,100 tons, 31,000 horse-power, and 24 knots speed.  Her length, beam, and draught are 500ft., 71ft., and 26ft.  This vessel?s original name was ?Africa,? but it was changed to ?Good Hope? before launching, in honour of the Cape Colony government, who had decided to present the Imperial government with a sum equivalent to the interest on her capital value. On November 25th, 1992, the ?Good Hope? left Portsmouth, commanded by Captain C.E. Madden and flying the flag of Rear-Admiral Wilmot H. Fawkes, conveying the Rt. Hon. Joseph Chamberlain to South Africa in connection with the settlement of many questions arising on the conclusion of the second Boer War.  She arrived at Durban on December 26th, 1902, and Mr. Chamberlain returned to England in the following year in the Union Castle.  ?Norman.?

HMS Grasshopper

The fourth ?GRASSHOPPER? was a 2-gun screw gunboat, launched at North fleet in 1856.  She was of 232 tons, 60 horse- power, and carried a crew of 36 men.  Her length, beam, and draught were 108ft., 22ft., and 6ft.  In November 1865 the ?Grasshopper,? commanded by Lieutenant George Digby Morant, while near Amoy, learned that three Chinese pirate lorchas, which were then at Port Matheson, had lately captured five junks.  On November 23rd Morant found the three pirates under sail with their prizes at anchor inside of them.  In spite of the vastly superior force opposed to him, the gallant Morant at once engaged the pirates, who tackled backwards and forwards in the shallow part of the bay.  At 11.a.m. a shell from the ?grasshopper? blew up the magazine of the largest lorcha and set fire to that vessel.  Having steamed round to prevent the other two from escaping, the cutter captured one of them.  The third lorcha kept up the engagement until 1.15 when she struck, Morant taking possession in his gig.  The gunboat was twice hulled, but had no casualties.  Upon seeing the ?Grasshopper? approach, the pirates had deliberately beheaded 34 of their prisoners, and disembowelled two boys, sons of the masters of two of the prizes.  Lieutenant Morant, who was promoted foe this affair, was fortunately able to capture 23 of the scoundrels who had jumped overboard.  The ?Grasshopper? on several other occasions rendered useful service of the same sort, and at her paying off, she was able to claim prize money in respect of 20 pirate vessels.    In 1871 the ?Grasshopper? was sold at Newchang for ?582.The fifth ?GRASSHOPPER? was a 2-gun twin-screw gunboat, launched at Sheerness in 1887.  She was of 525 tons, 2700 horse- power, and 19 knots speed.  Her length, beam, and draught were 200ft., 23ft., and 10ft.    In 1905 this vessel was sold.  The sixth ?Grasshopper? was a turbine coastel destroyer, launched at Thorneycroft?s Yard in 1907.  She was of 215 tons, 3750 horse- power, and 26 knots speed.  Her length, beam, and draught were 166ft., 17ft., and 6ft.  Before completion this vessel was given a number, and called torpedo boat No.9. The seventh ?GRASSHOPPER? is a turbine torpedo-boat destroyer, launched at Fairfield in 1910.  She is of 950 tons, 12,500 horse- power, and 27 knots speed.  Her length, beam, and draught are 265ft., 28ft., and 8ft.

HMS Griffon

The twelfth ?GRIFFON? was a 10-gun brig sloop, launched at Chatham in 1832.  She was 230 tons, and carried a crew of 60 men.  Her length, beam, and draught were 90ft., 25ft., and 10ft.   The ?Griffon? was subsequently converted to a 3-gun brigantine, and ended her career as a coal depot at Portsmouth, being broken up at Portsmouth in 1869.The thirteenth ?GRIFFON? was a 5-gun screw gunboat, launched at Northfleet in 1860.  She was of 425 tons, and 80 horse- power.  Her length, beam, and draught were 145ft., 26ft., and 8ft.   From 1861 to 1865 the ?Griffon? was engaged in the suppression of west African slavery, and assisted in capturing eight slavers.   In October 1866 the ?Griffon,? commanded by Commander Duncan G. Davidson, was stranded and lost after collision with H.M.S. ?Pandora? off little Popo.  The accident was due to the detective condition of the night-signalling system.The fourteenth ?GRIFFON? was a 3-gun screw gun vessel, launched at Birkenhead in 1876.  She was of 774 tons, 790 horse- power, and 11 knots speed.  Her length, beam, and draught were 158ft., 29ft., and 14ft.  In 1888 the ?Griffon? commanded by Commander John E. Blaxland, was one of a squadron of one German and seven English ships under Rear-Admiral the Hon.  Edmund Fremantle with his flag in ?Boadicea,? which took part in the blockade of the Zanzibar littoral.  This was undertaken in the interests of the suppression of slavery, and also in consequence of the revolt of several of the coast towns against German authority.  Apart from the capture of slave dhows, the blockade incidents were of an uninteresting nature. On October 17th, 1888, the ?Griffon?s? steam cutter, under Lieutenant Myles Cooper, chased and engaged a large dhow armed with one gun.  The dhow opened heavy fire; Lieutenant Cooper was mortally wounded and two seamen were injured.  Ship?s Corporal John Bray took charge and drove the dhow ashore, where the Arabs jumped overboard and fled, leaving her to be captured.   In 1891 the ?Griffon? was sold. The fifteenth ?GRIFFON? is a twin-screw torpedo-boat destroyer, launched at Birkenhead in 1896.  She is of 355 tons, 6300 horse- power, and 30 knots speed.  Her length, beam, and draught are 210ft., 20ft., and 5ft.

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