Home ] Up ] Acknowledgements ] How to use our site ]

HMS Warspite 1884 

Home ] Up ] [ HMS Warspite 1884 ] HMS Imperieuse ]

Choose the navy or section of interest below:

Royal Navy United States Germany France Japan Italy Russia Austria-Hungary
Canada Spain Netherlands Argentina Brazil Portugal Turkey Australia
Norway Sweden Denmark Belgium Chile Uruguay China New Zealand
Malta Greece India Poland South Africa Pakistan Libya Kuwait
Ireland Other Navies Liners   Unidentified Ships Wartime Naval Losses


Customer Helpline (UK) : 01436 820269
Subscribe to our Newsletter!

You currently have no items in your basket

Choose a FREE print if you spend over £220!
See Choice of Free Prints

Payment Options Display
Buy with confidence and security!
Publishing historical art since 1985

Google

 

Web

www.battleships-cruisers.co.uk

 

HMS Warspite and her sister ship HMS Imperieuse made up the class of heavily armoured cruisers. HMS Warspite was built at Chatham Dockyard and engined by Penn. and Launched 29th January 1884, while her sister ship HMS Imperious was built at Portsmouth Dockyard 1883 and engined by Maudslay. Both ships were completed in 1886 at a total cost of about £630,000 each. Imperieuse served as flagship on the China Station from 1889-94, and then the Pacific Station 1896-99. She was then renamed Sapphire II and was used as a destroyer depot ship but reverted back to Imperieuse in 1909. Warspite also served as flagship on the Pacific Station from 1890-93 and was then portguard ship at Queenstown from 1893-96.

They were copper sheathed, and (like the Inflexible) originally were to carry a heavy brig-rig. this was removed at a early stage, and a single military mast between the funnels substituted.  Both ships proved faster than expected, but the coming of the quick firer placed them in the semi - obsolete category almost as son as they were launched.  HMS  Warspite (shown left) was commissioned in 1890 as flagship in the Pacific and on her return home, in 1893, she was selected to carry the flag of the senior naval officer on the Irish coast. She was placed on the sale list in 1904 and scrapped before 1906.  HMS Imperieuse served on and in 1912 was a Depot ship for destroyers.

Above picture shows HMS Warspite preparing torpedo nets.

Displacement 8,400 tons,  Length. 315 feet.  beam 62 feet.  Draught 27.33 feet.   Horsepower 10,000 giving 16.75 knots

Armament. Four 9.2 inch guns,  six 6-inch guns. and six 14-inch torpedo Tubes.    Armour.  Belt amidships 10 inches. with 9 -inch Bulkheads. 8 inch Barbettes, No armour on Lesser Guns. 3 inch protective deck for and aft and on top of belt. 9 inch Conning tower.

HMS Warspite, April, 1895

HMS Warspite - Portguard Ship at Queenstown

The Warspite was a copper-sheathed first-class cruiser, completed for sea in 1888. She was built at Chatham Dockyard and engined by Messrs Penn. During her service at Queenstown (1888-89) she carried as her armament four 22 ton guns, ten 6 in guns, four 6 pounder guns and nine 3 pounder quick firing guns. At this time she carried the flag of Rear-Admiral Claude E Buckle. Her sister ship was about to be commissioned as flagship on the Pacific Station, in relief of the Royal Arthur.

At Drill with a 22-ton Chaser Gun on board HMS Warspite.

A gun detachment of bluejackets handling one of the 22 ton chase guns carried by the first-class cruiser Warspite. The Warspite carried four 22 ton heavy breech-loaders, one training forward, one aft, and one on each broadside. The gun parties are all protected by shields and screens of thick steel, while the guns have the advantage of being rapidly worked by hand in case the hydraulic power, their primary motive power, should fail.

Original Page photo  image from quality magazine published in 1896 image  size 8" x 6" approx , plus title and specifications. price £15 plus £3 post for UK £10 overseas, recorded airmail  order number AN2/67 order magazine photo  here

Rear-Admiral Claude E Buckle and the Officers of HMS Warspite, Queenstown.

This photograph shows (in centre of group) Rear-Admiral Claude Buckle, Commander-in-Chief at Queenstown, who had his flag in the Warspite at the time, with (on the Admiral's right), Captain F R Boardman C.B., and on the Admiral's left, Commander J.M. Stokes. The reason why so few other officers are seen is because at this time Warspite was just a First Reserve ship and only half the seagoing compliment were on board.

Original Page photo  image from quality magazine published in 1896 image  size 8" x 6" approx , plus title and specifications. price £15 plus £3 post for UK £10 overseas, recorded airmail  order number AN2/67b  order magazine photo  here

In the Sick Bay of the Cruiser Warspite

The sick bay, the general hospital quarters on board ship are always in a carefully selected place, as far forward as convenient space for comfort and airiness can be got, away from the noise and vibration of the ship's engines and propelling machinery. Here we see the accommodation for the sick on board the first-class cruiser Warspite, of the First Reserve Squadron, stationed as guardship at Queenstown. Though a ship of the 1880's and perhaps in some ways hardly as roomy as later first-class cruisers, such as the ships of the Royal Arthur and Gibraltar class, the Sick Bay on board the Warspite is all the same, a sufficiently comfortable and healthy apartment, and fitted completely with up-to-date appliances of every kind to ensure rest and quietude to its occupants from first admission to final convalescence and discharge to duty.

Original Page photo  image from quality magazine published in 1896 image  size 10" x 8" approx , plus title and specifications. price £20 plus £3 post for UK £10 overseas, recorded airmail  order number AN2/68 order magazine photo  here

The British Station in the Far West 1902

HMS Warspite shown on left, the flagship of the station with HMS Icarus and Amphibian naval sloops and the ill-fated HMS Condor.

 

 

Valuations

Classified Ads Terms and Conditions Shipping Info Contact Details

 

 

Click here to go to our naval history forum

 

AVIATION PRINTS

Click above to see all of our aviation art index - Eight random half price aviation items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Aviation Art Offers

 Hurricane Mk.IIC Z3971 of 253 Sqn, closing on a Heinkel 111.

Hurricane Mk.IIC by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £45.00
 Fw190A-4/U8 night bomber variant of SKG.10.

Focke Wulf Fw190A-4/U8 by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £70.00
 It is January 1945, and its cold. The German advance in the Ardennes is nearly over, but the Panzer Army is desperately throwing more troops into the breach who try to keep their momentum going in The Battle of the Bulge. Tasked with preventing German reinforcements from reaching the battle front, the Ninth Air Force launched a series of low-level attacks on enemy ground forces as they wind their way through the Ardennes. Flying conditions were not easy, cloud bases were low, and snow was in the air. Nicolas Trudgians new painting recreates an attack on January 23, 1945, by Douglas A-20 Havocs of the 410th Bomb Group. Locating an enemy convoy in open space near the German town of Blankenheim, the Havoc pilots make a swift attack diving from 8000 feet, catching the German force by surprise: Hurtling down the line of vehicles at 320mph they release their parafrag bombs from 300 feet then, dropping just above the roofs of the army trucks continue down the column blasting everything in sight with their forward-firing .50mm caliber machine guns. In the space of a few minutes the attack is completed and the convoy decimated. With ammunition expended and fuel running low the A-20 Havocs climb out of the zone and head for base in France. A 20mm shell has hit the lead aircraft wounding the Bombardier/Navigator Gordon Jones, which will seriously hamper their return through a blizzard, but all aircraft make it safely home - the lead aircraft, on landing, counting over 100 holes of various sizes. For their part in leading the successful attack the Lead Pilot Russell Fellers and Bombardier/Navigator Gordon G. Jones received the Silver Star. <br><br><b>Published 2001.<br><br>Signed by A-20 Havoc combat aircrews, including two Silver Star recipients, from World War Two.</b>

Raising Havoc in the Ardennes by Nicolas Trudgian. (Y)
Half Price! - £125.00
The last purely British fighter aircraft to be used by the Royal Air Force, the Lightning offered a truly massive performance advantage over existing equipment when it was introduced into squadron service in 1960, achieving level flight speed of around, 1400mph. The prototype known as the P1 had flown in 1954 but production aircraft were not available until 1959, a long gestation period but perhaps understandable with such an advanced machine with many untried, new features. The painting shows an F1A of 111 squadron taking off from its base at Wattisham. The remarque drawing shows an aircraft of 56 squadron Firebirds in 1963 when they were the official RAF aerobatics team for that year. 337 Lightnings were produced, serving with nine squadrons of the Royal Air Force before being supersede by the Phantom and Tornado.
BAC Lightning by Keith Woodcock.
Half Price! - £20.00

 It is August 1944, barely two months since the Allies landed their first troops on the beaches of Normandy. After the failed Operation Lüttich (codename given to a German counterattack during the Battle of Normandy, which took place around the American positions near Mortain from 7 August to 13 August, 1944 ) The German Panzer Divisions were in full retreat, The British and American Generals believed it to be critical to halt them before they cauld regroup. Caught in the Gap at Falaise, the battle was to be decisive. Flying throughout a continuous onslaught, rocket-firing Typhoons kept up their attacks on the trapped armoured divisions from dawn to dusk. The effect was devastating: at the end of the ten day battle the 100,000 strong German force was decimated. The battle of the Falaise Pocket marked the closing phase of the Battle of Normandy with a decisive German defeat. It is believed that between 80,000 to 100,000 German troops were caught in the encirclement of which 10,000 to 15,000 were killed, 45,000 to 50,000 taken prisoner, and around 20,000 escaped . Shown here are German Tiger I tanks under continues attack by Royal Aoir Force Typhoons.

Taming the Tiger by Geoff Lea. (Y)
Half Price! - £50.00
 Lockheed Vega PV-1 VB32 Squadron in the Santaren Channel. From this point on the U-boat was hunted and harassed only to be sunk in the Bay of Biscay.

The Hunt for U-Boat 134 by David Pentland.
Half Price! - £35.00
 No one will ever know exactly what caused Max Immelmanns demise, but what is known is that his propeller was seen to disintegrate, which caused a series violent oscillations that ripped the Fokker E.III apart, the tail breaking away before the wings folded back, trapping the young German ace in his cockpit. The popular belief is that his interrupter gear malfunctioned, causing him to shoot away part of his own propeller, but British reports attribute Immelmanns loss to the gunnery of Cpl J H Waller from the nose of FE.2b 6346 flown by 2Lt G R McCubbin on Sunday, 18th June 1916. Immelmann was flying the spare E.III 246/16 as his own E.IV had been badly shot up earlier that day.

Immelmanns Last Flight by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £60.00
 A moment during the fraught encounter on 27th May 1940 over Dunkirk between Spitfires of 610 Sqn and an estimated 40 Bf.110s during which three Zerstorers were shot down.

A Dunkirk Encounter by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - £270.00

 

NAVAL PRINTS

Click above to see all of our naval art index - Eight random half price naval items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Naval Art Offers

 Pride of the Royal Navy, the mighty Hood rolls majestically in the north Atlantic swell as HMS Prince of Wales holds station off her starboard bow.

HMS Hood by Ivan Berryman. (Y)
Half Price! - £50.00
B111.  The Pursuit of the Graf Spee by Ivan Berryman.

The Pursuit of the Graf Spee by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £15.00
The moment shortly after dawn on 24th May 1941 when HMS Hood, in company with HMS Prince of Wales, opens fire on the Bismarck, setting in motion one of the greatest sea dramas the world had seen.

HMS Hood Engages Bismarck by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £15.00
B146AP.  HMS Jamaica by Ivan Berryman.

HMS Jamaica by Ivan Berryman (AP)
Half Price! - £25.00

 Fully dressed and resplendent, HMS Hood is pictured preparing for King George Vs review of the Fleet in July 1935 as other capital ships take up their positions around her. Ramillies can be seen off Hoods port bow, Resolution astern, whilst just beyond her boat deck, the mighty Nelson gently nudges into position.

HMS Hood by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - £2900.00
 HMS Glorious flying off a Fairey Swordfish at sunset with HMS Ardent off to Starboard.

HMS Glorious by Ivan Berryman. (Y)
Half Price! - £50.00
 Late October 1942 in the waters east of Guadalcanal, the Battle of Santa Cruz saw the sinking of the US carrier Hornet, in what proved to be the last major carrier battle of the South Pacific theatre.

USS Hornet, Eye of the Storm by Anthony Saunders
Half Price! - £40.00
 The lead ship of the Royal Navy's Vanguard Class SSBNs, HMS Vanguard (S28) was commissioned on 14th August 1993 and is based at HMNB Clyde at Faslane.

HMS Vanguard in the Gareloch by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - £700.00

 

MILITARY PRINTS

Click above to see all of our military art index - Eight random half price military items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Military Art Offers

 Charge of the 4th Regiment of Hussars at the Battle of Friedland, June 14th 1807.

Viva L Empereur after Edouard Detaille. (Y)
Half Price! - £25.00
 Battle of Agincourt, October 25th 1415. Fought during the Hundred years war at the end of the English Invasion of 1415. King Henry the V of England, after his conquest of Harfleur marched his army of 1,000 Knights and 5,000 Archers (many of which were Welsh) towards Calais. He marched to Amiens as flooding had affected the river at the Somme which was the direct route. This delay helped the French army of 20,000 strong under the command of the Constable Charles dAlbret and Marshal Jean Bouciquaut II. The French army blocked Henry V route to Calais, giving the English no choice but to fight. Henry V positioned his army at Agincourt, between to wooded areas giving a frontage of 1100 metres. Henry deployed his force into three divisions; each group had archers at each flank. He had chosen his position well, in front of his army was ploughed fields and due to the heavy raid was very muddy. Due to the narrow battlefield area the French army lost their advantage of superior numbers. At 11 oclock the English started to advance their archers within 2509 yards of the French, getting them into range of the French lines. The French line of Cavalry advanced at a slow pass due to the heavy mud, They took heavy losses from the arrows from the English Long Bowman. They were eventually repulsed by the Archers who as the French cavalry approached changed from using longbows for axes and swords. The French second Cavalry line advanced only to be finally repulsed after hand to hand fighting. The commander Duc dAlencon was killed in the attack. The second charge had failed and many of the French knights were taken prisoner. Believing he had been attacked in the rear Henry V ordered that the prisoners were to be put to death. In fact There was no real rear attack it was French Camp followers plundering the English Camp. The French camp followers were quickly dealt with and the English again prepared itself for the next attack. The third attack never materialized as the sight of so much blood shed and piles of corpses turned the charge into a retreat. The English had won the day with losses less than 1600 compared to the French losses of over 7,000, including the capture of Bouciquaut. Henry V, his way now cleared reached Calais on the 16th November 1415. Agincourt is one of the great battles of military history, and this victory enabled Henry V to return to France in 1417 and conquer all of Normandy.

Morning of Agincourt by Sir John Gilbert. (Y)
Half Price! - £30.00
 The Mark IV Tank of Lt. F. MItchell MC, 1st battalion Tank Corps engages A7V tanks at Villers-Bretonneux, 24th April 1918.

The First Tank versus Tank Action by David Rowlands. (Y)
Half Price! - £40.00
 OT34 Flamethrower tank and men of Col. Krickmans 6th Guards Tank Brigade take part in the Soviet counter attacks of 13th-27th September in defence of the southern factory district of Stalingrad before the final offensive in October.

Motherland, The Battle of Stalingrad, September 1942 by David Pentland.
Half Price! - £95.00

DHM500.  Brunswick Hussar, Quatre Bras 16th June 1815 by Brian Palmer.

Brunswick Hussar, Quatre Bras 16th June 1815 by Brian Palmer.
Half Price! - £20.00
 British MK1 Grant tanks of the Staffordshire Yeomanry 8th Armoured Brigade, 10th Armoured Division, breakout from El Alamein.

Operation Supercharge, 4th November 1941 by David Pentland. (AP)
Half Price! - £115.00
To commemorate the first use of Factor VIIa by British Forces.
Dawn Casevac, 16 Close Support Medical Regiment - Iraq 2003 by Ivan Berryman. (Y)
Half Price! - £65.00
 This, my personal interpretation of the viking period attempts to highlight aspects of their rich and diverse culture. A superstitious and pagan society, their influence was felt far beyond their native Scandinavia. 1 . The upper background deals with their pagan worship and tales from their mythology. This is represented by Odin & Thor, their principal Gods along with the saga of Sigurd the Dragonslayer. 2. The dominant figure at the centre is Aegir, God of the Sea whose goodwill was all important to the seafaring Viking. The scene now comes into the real world of their ships and seamanship, expertise for which they had no peer. 3. The extension of their seafaring was to raid, trade and pillage foreign shores, resulting in colonisation and settlement, with scant respect for Christianity or the Church. They ventured still further, exploring the unknown world, this is suggested in the two lower corners. 4. In England, the only King to successfully rise up against these Norsemen was Alfred the Great, a Saxon, represented in the lower centre drawing his sword from a swamp. This symbolises the raising of his army from the marshes of Wessex. Their legacy remains with us today, in language and art.

The Vikings by Brian Wood. (Y)
Half Price! - £360.00

 

SPORT PRINTS

Click above to see all of our sport art index - Eight random half price sport items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Sport Art Offers

 David Coulthard. McLaren Mercedes MP4/13
A Scottish Gentleman by Michael Thompson.
Half Price! - £25.00
B41. Nigel Mansell, McLaren MP4/10/B by Ivan Berryman.

Nigel Mansell, McLaren MP4/10/B by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £40.00
 Three Steps To Heaven pays tribute to one of the greatest strikers to play for Liverpool and in particular, the historic Cup treble in 2001. It contains details of the FA Cup triumph over Arsenal, Worthington Cup win over Birmingham City and the unforgettable 5-4 defeat of Spanish side Alaves to complete the cup treble and bring back the UEFA Cup to Merseyside.

Three Steps to Heaven by Robert Highton. (Y)
Half Price! - £72.00


Michael Atherton by Keith Fearon.
Half Price! - £70.00

 Ferrari Pit Stop 2001.
Masters of Strategy II by Michael Thompson.
Half Price! - £33.00
Champion racing horse West Tip at Cheltenham race course.

West Tip by Mark Churms.
Half Price! - £20.00
Celebrating Sir Alexs magnificent orchestration of Manchester Uniteds historic treble cup success of 1999.

Sir Alex Ferguson by Darren Baker.
Half Price! - £50.00
 A quartet of Ferrari 801s are warmed up at Rouen-les-Essarts.  French Grand Prix 1957.

Thoroughbreds in the Paddock by Ray Goldsbrough.
Half Price! - £75.00

Everything we obtain for this site is shown on the site, we do not have any more photos, crew lists or further information on any of the ships.

COPYRIGHT NOTICE. ALL IMAGES DISPLAYED ON THIS WEBSITE ARE PROTECTED BY  COPYRIGHT  LAW, AND ARE OWNED BY CRANSTON FINE ARTS OR THEIR RESPECTIVE OWNERS.  NO REPRODUCTION OR COPYING ALLOWED ON OTHER WEBSITES, BOOKS OR ARTICLES WITHOUT PRIOR AGREEMENT.

This website is owned by Cranston Fine Arts.  Torwood House, Torwoodhill Road, Rhu, Helensburgh, Scotland, G848LE

Contact: Tel: (+44) (0) 1436 820269.  Fax: (+44) (0) 1436 820473. Email:

Return to Home Page