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HMS Warspite 1884 

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HMS Warspite and her sister ship HMS Imperieuse made up the class of heavily armoured cruisers. HMS Warspite was built at Chatham Dockyard and engined by Penn. and Launched 29th January 1884, while her sister ship HMS Imperious was built at Portsmouth Dockyard 1883 and engined by Maudslay. Both ships were completed in 1886 at a total cost of about £630,000 each. Imperieuse served as flagship on the China Station from 1889-94, and then the Pacific Station 1896-99. She was then renamed Sapphire II and was used as a destroyer depot ship but reverted back to Imperieuse in 1909. Warspite also served as flagship on the Pacific Station from 1890-93 and was then portguard ship at Queenstown from 1893-96.

They were copper sheathed, and (like the Inflexible) originally were to carry a heavy brig-rig. this was removed at a early stage, and a single military mast between the funnels substituted.  Both ships proved faster than expected, but the coming of the quick firer placed them in the semi - obsolete category almost as son as they were launched.  HMS  Warspite (shown left) was commissioned in 1890 as flagship in the Pacific and on her return home, in 1893, she was selected to carry the flag of the senior naval officer on the Irish coast. She was placed on the sale list in 1904 and scrapped before 1906.  HMS Imperieuse served on and in 1912 was a Depot ship for destroyers.

Above picture shows HMS Warspite preparing torpedo nets.

Displacement 8,400 tons,  Length. 315 feet.  beam 62 feet.  Draught 27.33 feet.   Horsepower 10,000 giving 16.75 knots

Armament. Four 9.2 inch guns,  six 6-inch guns. and six 14-inch torpedo Tubes.    Armour.  Belt amidships 10 inches. with 9 -inch Bulkheads. 8 inch Barbettes, No armour on Lesser Guns. 3 inch protective deck for and aft and on top of belt. 9 inch Conning tower.

HMS Warspite, April, 1895

HMS Warspite - Portguard Ship at Queenstown

The Warspite was a copper-sheathed first-class cruiser, completed for sea in 1888. She was built at Chatham Dockyard and engined by Messrs Penn. During her service at Queenstown (1888-89) she carried as her armament four 22 ton guns, ten 6 in guns, four 6 pounder guns and nine 3 pounder quick firing guns. At this time she carried the flag of Rear-Admiral Claude E Buckle. Her sister ship was about to be commissioned as flagship on the Pacific Station, in relief of the Royal Arthur.

At Drill with a 22-ton Chaser Gun on board HMS Warspite.

A gun detachment of bluejackets handling one of the 22 ton chase guns carried by the first-class cruiser Warspite. The Warspite carried four 22 ton heavy breech-loaders, one training forward, one aft, and one on each broadside. The gun parties are all protected by shields and screens of thick steel, while the guns have the advantage of being rapidly worked by hand in case the hydraulic power, their primary motive power, should fail.

Original Page photo  image from quality magazine published in 1896 image  size 8" x 6" approx , plus title and specifications. price £15 plus £3 post for UK £10 overseas, recorded airmail  order number AN2/67 order magazine photo  here

Rear-Admiral Claude E Buckle and the Officers of HMS Warspite, Queenstown.

This photograph shows (in centre of group) Rear-Admiral Claude Buckle, Commander-in-Chief at Queenstown, who had his flag in the Warspite at the time, with (on the Admiral's right), Captain F R Boardman C.B., and on the Admiral's left, Commander J.M. Stokes. The reason why so few other officers are seen is because at this time Warspite was just a First Reserve ship and only half the seagoing compliment were on board.

Original Page photo  image from quality magazine published in 1896 image  size 8" x 6" approx , plus title and specifications. price £15 plus £3 post for UK £10 overseas, recorded airmail  order number AN2/67b  order magazine photo  here

In the Sick Bay of the Cruiser Warspite

The sick bay, the general hospital quarters on board ship are always in a carefully selected place, as far forward as convenient space for comfort and airiness can be got, away from the noise and vibration of the ship's engines and propelling machinery. Here we see the accommodation for the sick on board the first-class cruiser Warspite, of the First Reserve Squadron, stationed as guardship at Queenstown. Though a ship of the 1880's and perhaps in some ways hardly as roomy as later first-class cruisers, such as the ships of the Royal Arthur and Gibraltar class, the Sick Bay on board the Warspite is all the same, a sufficiently comfortable and healthy apartment, and fitted completely with up-to-date appliances of every kind to ensure rest and quietude to its occupants from first admission to final convalescence and discharge to duty.

Original Page photo  image from quality magazine published in 1896 image  size 10" x 8" approx , plus title and specifications. price £20 plus £3 post for UK £10 overseas, recorded airmail  order number AN2/68 order magazine photo  here

The British Station in the Far West 1902

HMS Warspite shown on left, the flagship of the station with HMS Icarus and Amphibian naval sloops and the ill-fated HMS Condor.

 

 

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AVIATION PRINTS

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 Erich Lowenhardt was already the holder of the Knights Cross 1st and 2nd Class for acts of bravery even before becoming a pilot. After serving as an observer for a year, he was eventually posted to Jasta 10 in 1917 where he immediately began to score victories, sending down balloons and enemy aircraft at a fearsome rate. He was appointed Commander of Jasta 10 one week before his 21st birthday, making him one the youngest pilots to rise to such a rank in the German Army Air Service. He continued to increase his score steadily throughout 1917 and 1918, but was involved in a mid-air collision with a Jasta 11 aircraft on 10th August. Lowenhardt elected to abandon his aircraft, but his parachute failed to deploy and the young ace fell to his death. He flew a number of aircraft, but this yellow-fuselaged Fokker D.VII was his most distinctive and is believed to be the aircraft in which he was killed. His final victory total was 54.

Oberleutnant Erich Lowenhardt by Ivan Berryman. (APB)
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 A C130 Hercules MK1 from RAF Lynham Transport Wing, delivers a low level Brigade drop of Airbourne forces over Salisbury Plain.

Dawn Descent by David Pentland. (Y)
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 Often described as the most effective fighter escorts in the US Army Air Force, the famous red-tailed Tuskegee airmen could proudly boast that they never lost a single bomber to enemy fighters in all the missions flown. Nearest aircraft here is the P51C of Lt. Lee A Archer Jr, who finished the war with four confirmed victories and one shared. His personal aircraft was named <i>Ina the Macon Belle</i> after his wife.

Red Tails by Ivan Berryman. (P)
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 Nine O Nine awaits her next mission over occupied Europe. Part of the 91st Bomb Group, 323rd Squadron, this B-17 went on to complete a record mission tally of 140 without an abort or loss of a single crew member. She started operations in February 1944. By April 1945 Nine O Nine had flown an extraordinary 1,129 hours. This aircraft and crew represented just one of many who fought in war-torn skies for the freedom we now enjoy.

Nine O Nine by Philip West. (Y)
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 On the afternoon of 5th September 1940, Spitfires of 41 Sqn intercepted a large formation of Heinkel 111 bombers and their escorts over the Thames estuary, en route for London.  Flying N3162 as Red 2, Flight Lieutenant Eric Lock attacked the bombers head on as they began to turn north.  In a fraught combat, Lock was to destroy two He.111s and a Bf.109 on that single mission, setting him on course to become the highest scoring ace in the RAF during the Battle of Britain with sixteen confirmed victories and one shared.  His final total at the end of the war was twenty six kills confirmed and eight probables.

Total Commitment by Ivan Berryman. (P)
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 Two Fairey Firefly fighter-bombers of 810 Sqn, Fleet Air Arm, overfly the carrier HMS Theseus during the Korean War.

HMS Theseus by Ivan Berryman.
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 F/Lt (later Wing Commander) Baldwin was to become the highest-scoring Typhoon pilot of all with 15 confirmed victories, one shared, one probable and four damaged. He is depicted here downing a Bf.109 in Typhoon 1B, DN360 (PR-A) of 609 Sqn over Beachy Head.

F/Lt J R Baldwin by Ivan Berryman.
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 Portsmouth August 26th 1940, the lone spitfire of Squadron Leader Sandy Johnstone breaks the ranks and picks off one of the menacing Heinkels only to encounter an equally determined attack from a BF109. <br><br>We were brought to readiness in the middle of lunch and scrambled to intercept mixed bag of 100+ Heinkel IIIs and DO 17s approaching Portsmouth from the South.  The controller did a first class job and positioned us one thousand feet above the target. with the sun  behind us, allowing us to spot the raiders from a long way off. No escorting Messchersmitts were in sight at the time, although a sizable force was to turn up soon after. then something strange happened.  I was about to give a ticking off to our chaps for misusing the R/T when I realised I was listening to German voices. It appeared we were both using the same frequency and, although having no knowledge of the language it sounded from the monotonous flow of the conversation that they were unaware of our presence. as soon  as we dived towards the leading formation, however we were assailed immediately to loud shouts of  Achtung Spitfuern Spitfuern! as our bullets began to take their toll.  In spite of having taken jerry by surprise our bag was only six, with others claimed as damaged, before the remainder dived for cloud cover and turned for home. In the meantime the escorting fighters were amongst us when two of our fellows were badly shot up. Hector Maclean stopped a cannon shell on his cockpit, blowing his foot off above the ankle although, in spite of his grave injuries, he managed to fly his spitfire back to Tangmere to land with wheels retracted. Cyril Babbages aircraft was also badly damaged in the action. forcing him to abandon it and take to his parachute. He was ultimately picked up by a rescue launch and put ashore at Bognor, having suffered only minor injuries.  I personally accounted for one Heinkel III in the action (Sandy Johnson) . <br><br>No. 602 City of Glasgow auxiliary squadron was a household name long before WWII began. It had been the first auxiliary squadron to get into the air in 1925, two of its members, Lord Clydeside and David McIntyre  were the first to conquer Mount Everest in 1933, the squadron sweeped the board in gunnery and bombing in 1935, beating the regular squadrons at their own game. It was the first auxiliary Squadron to be equipped with Spitfire Fighters as far back as March 1939 and it was the first squadron to shoot down the first enemy aircraft on British soil.  The squadron moved south from Drem airfield in East Lothian on August 14th 1940 to relieve the already battered no. 145 squadron at Westhampnett, Tangmeres satelitte station in Sussex. The squadron suffered 5 casualties during the battle. The squadron remained at Westhampnett until December 1940 to be replaced by no. 610 auxiliary airforce squadron. No 602 squadron itself remained active up until 1957 when it was put into mothballs.

Gauntlet by Anthony Saunders (P)
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NAVAL PRINTS

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 The heavy cruiser HMS Dorsetshire is brought up to sink the blazing wreck of the Bismarck with torpedoes at around 10:30 hours on the morning of May 27th 1941.  The once proud German ship had been ruthlessly pounded into a twisted and burning wreck by the British battleships Rodney and King George V.  HMS Dorsetshire and HMS Maori combed the area of the sinking for survivors, between them picking up a total of 110 out of an original complement of 2,300.

HMS Dorsetshire (The End of the Bismarck) by Ivan Berryman.
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The Pedestal Convoy of August 1942 was one of the most heavily protected convoys in the history of sea warfare.  Fourteen of the fastest cargo ships of the time were protected by 4 carriers, 2 battleships, 7 cruisers and 32 destroyers.  The destroyer HMS Ashanti is in the foreground of the painting.  Also depicted are the carrier HMS Indomitable, with her Hurricanes cirling the convoy overhead, and the cargoe ship Port Chalmers to the right of the picture.

Pedestal Convoy by Anthony Saunders (Y)
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 The newly converted Command Helicopter Cruiser HMS Blake leaves Grand Harbour Malta at the end of the 1960s.  In the background, the old Submarine Depot ship HMS Forth lies at anchor at the very end of her long career.

HMS Blake by Ivan Berryman. (P)
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Depicting Titanic with the sun going down for the last time.

Titanic by Robert Barbour (AP)
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 Launched on the Clyde on 1st February 2006, HMS Daring was the first of six Type 45 AAW destroyers ordered for the Royal Navy, the type representing a massive leap forward in technology and capability.  HMS Daring was officially handed over to the Royal Navy on 10th December 2008 and is depicted here in liaison with a Merlin helicopter.

HMS Daring by Ivan Berryman. (P)
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 HMS Broadsword and the aircraft carrier Hermes battle their way through the storm on their way to the Battle for the Falklands.

Storm Force to the Falklands by Anthony Saunders (Y)
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 Designed by the great Ernst Heinkel, the diminutive D.1 was an essential stop-gap that provided the Austro-Hungarian pilots with a front line fighter until they were able to re-equip with Albatros scouts in the Summer of 1917. This little aircraft performed well and was generally held in high regard by its pilots, although it did have some shortcomings, namely that forward vision was extremely limited and the Schwarzloses gun was completely concealed in the overwing pod that made it inaccessible in the air. Most unusual of all was its interplane strut arrangement, designed to reduce drag, which gave it the nicknames Starstrutter or Spider. These examples are shown passing above the German cruiser Derfflinger. 

Brandenburg D.1 by Ivan Berryman. (GL)
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USS Maddox engaging North Vietnamese torpedo boats with 5-in gunfire, August 2nd, 1964, in the Gulf of Tonkin.

USS Maddox by Randall Wilson (AP)
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MILITARY PRINTS

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 Probably depicts the rescue of gunners of the Royal Horse artillery (C-Battery) during the retreat from the battle of Maiwand.

Rescue of the Wounded by Lady Elizabeth Butler (Y)
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 The 13th Light Dragoons cross a small river as part of Wellingtons armies advance on Vittoria in June 1813 during the Peninsula Campaign.

Advance on Vittoria by Chris Collingwood (P)
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DHM622GL. M109 Guns of the 40th Field Regiment Royal Artillery Approaching the Basra Road, Kuwait, 28th February 1991.

M109 Guns of the 40th Field Regiment Royal Artillery Approaching the Basra Road, Kuwait, 28th February 1991. (GL)
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 Study for the original painting Charge and Pursue.
Lucknow 1857 - Queens Bays Trooper Engaging Mutinous Officer by Mark Churms. (P)
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 The Battle of Ulundi took place at the Zulu capital of Ulundi on 4th July 1879. Ulundi became the last battle to be fought during the Zulu war and the British victory finally broke the military power of the Zulu Nation. The battle began at 6 a.m. when Buller led out an advance guard of mounted troops and South African irregulars. The British force comprised of five companies of the 80th regiment in square in four ranks, with two Gatling Guns in the centres, two 9-pounders on the left flank and two 7-pounders on the right. The 90th Light Infantry with four companies of the 94th regiment made up the left face with two more 7-pounders. On the right face were the 1st Battalion of the 13th Light Infantry, four companies of the 58th Regiment, two 7-pounders and two 9-pounders. The rear face was composed of two companies of the 94th Regiment and two companies of the 2nd Battalion of the 21st Regiment. In the middle of the square were headquarters staff, No. 5 company of the Royal Engineers whhich was led by Lt John Chard who had commanded the troops at Rorkes Drift, the 2nd Native Natal Contingent, fifty wagons and carts with reserve ammunition and hospital wagons. Bullers horsemen protected the front and both flanks of the square. A rearguard of two squadrons of the 17th Lancers and a troop of Natal Native Horse followed. In total the British force stood at just over 5300 against the Zulu warrior regiments in total over 15000. The Zulu warriors charged again and again at the square but with the strong British firepower of tifle and gatling gun, they could not get close. As the Zulu warriors strength weakened, Lord Chelmsford ordered the cavalry to mount, and the 17th Lancers and the 1st Kings Dragoon Guards along with colonial cavalry were ordered to charge the now fleeing Zulus. The Zulus fled towards the high ground with the cavalry in pursuit. The Lancers were checked at the Mbilane stream by the fire of a concealed party of Zulus, causing a number casualties before the 17th Lancers overcame the Zulu resistance. The pursuit continued until not one living Zulu remained on the Mahlabatini plain, with members of the Natal Native Horse, Natal Native Contingent and Woods Irregulars slaughtering the Zulu wounded, done in revenge for the massacre at Isandlwana.

The Death or Glory Boys by Bud Bradshaw. (Y)
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 At about 2.00pm the Union Brigade crashes through the ranks on Napoleons Ist Infantry Corps. The 2nd Royal North British Dragoons (later known as The Scots Greys) on the far left of the line, plow through Marcognets division, only Duruttes division will escape intact. With Brigade General Ponsortby at their head, elements of the now disordered Cavalry charge on to the French artillery.  Even though, at close quarters, the Gunners and attached Infantry are no match for the wild Scots, they desperately try to save their 12 pounder field pieces. However the British heavy Cavalry is now out of control and Napoleons retribution will be swift.  From the undulating ground before Paillotte comes the thunder of hooves and the deadly lances of 4th Regiment and the 3th Chasseurs a Cheval. In the confusion many of the British soldiers are completely unaware of the onslaught as the fresh French Cavalry sweeps through their flank.  Ponsonbys mount leaps through the mud as the exhausted Brigade is herded together for the final kill.  Even against all odds the brave men continue to fight. The Brigade General himself will shortly be sabred by Sergeant Urban as he attempts to capture the eagle of the 4th Lancers.

Charge of the Union Brigade by Mark Churms. (P)
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 The Queens Bays engage enemy foot and horse outside Luknow, led by Major Percy Smith. The regiment was given the order to charge and pursue. The Bays thundered into action accompanied by the second Punjab cavalry. In the action Major Percy Smith was killed along with two corporals.

Charge and Pursue by Mark Churms. (AP)
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The Battle of Marathon 490 BC during the Persian Greek Wars. King Darious I of Persia sent his son in law Mardonius to invade Greece in 492 BC.  The Persian Forces conquered Thrace and Macedonia before their fleet was devastated by a storm. Mardonia was forced to return to Asia.  A second Persian invasion force crossed the Aegean sea. After conquering Eretria, the Persian Army under Datis (15,000 strong) landed near Marathon.  (Marathon is 24 miles northeast of Athens.) General Miltiades, general in the Greek army gathered a force of 10,000 Athenians and 1,000 Plataean citizen Soldiers.

Battle of Marathon by Brian Palmer (P)
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SPORT PRINTS

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Lennox Lewis by Peter Deighan.
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Unarguably the most famous Flying Finn of the past years has been Mika Häkkinen who won the F1 championship twice 1998-1999 and also raced in DTM between 2005 and 2007.

The Flying Finn by Ray Goldsbrough
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SFA19.  Laytown Beach by Chris Howells.
Laytown Beach by Chris Howells.
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 Sir Bobby played more than 750 games for Manchester United, scoring 247 goals. He also played 106 times for his country and scored a record 49 goals. One of only two Englishmen to have won World Cup and European Cup medals his name will always remain synonymous with some of the greatest moments in the English game.

Sir Bobby Charlton by Gary Keane. (Y)
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B49. Damon Hill/ Williams FW.17 by Ivan Berryman

Damon Hill/ Williams FW.17 by Ivan Berryman
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 Depicting Englands emphatic 1995 grand slam victory.

1995 Grand Slam by Scott Bridges. (Y)
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Epsom Trophy, Polo Championship

Epsom Trophy by Mark Churms. (AP)
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 In 1992 Matthew graduated in Geography from St. Catherine's College, Oxford, where he was President of the Oxford Rowing Club.  He took part in the Oxford and Cambridge Boat Race in 1990 and 1991, when Oxford beat Cambridge by substantial distances.  Also in 1992, at the age of only 21, Matthew had his first taste of Olympic success, when in a coxless pair with partner Sir Steve Redgrave, he won the gold medal at the Barcelona Olympics.  Prior to that Olympic win he and Redgrave had enjoyed an unbeaten international season, and it was already obvious that Matthew was developing to become one of the world's greatest oarsmen.  At the Atlanta Olympics in 1996 the Pinsent / Redgrave duo won another gold medal and throughout the nineties their outstanding combination also brought them seven world championship golds.  Their unbroken run of success continued through to the millennium Olympic games in Sydney when Pinsent, again with Redgrave (now in a coxless four with James Cracknell and Tim Foster) again triumphed earning Pinsent his third Olympic gold medal.  The race in which he did it was voted Britain's greatest sporting moment and the crew secured themselves a very special place in the heart of the nation.  After Sydney, Matthew formed a seemingly invincible coxless pair partnership with James Cracknell MBE.  Undefeated throughout 2001, they went on to complete a unique feat in the history of rowing, by winning the coxless pair at the world championships in Lucerne, a mere two hours after winning the coxed pairs.  In the 2002 world championships in Seville they defended their coxless pairs title, beating an experienced Australian crew who had beaten them in Lucerne earlier in the year and breaking the world record by 4 seconds in the process.  On Saturday 21st August 2004 at the Athens Olympic games, Matthew Pinsent CBE entered Olympic history.  In one of the classic sporting moments of all time, he led the Great Britain coxless four to victory over the Canadian world champions by only eight hundredths of a second.  Matthew was awarded the MBE in the 1993 New Year's Honours List and the CBE in the New Year's Honours List 2003.  In the 2005 New Year's Honours List he was awarded a knighthood.

Sir Matthew Pinsent CBE by James Owen.
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