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HMS Imperieuse 

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HMS Imperieuse, Royal Navy armoured cruiser built at Portsmouth Dockyard and launched on 18th December 1883. HMS Imperieuse served as flagship to the China Station 1889-1894 and moving to the Pacific Station 1896 -1899. She became a destroyer depot ship at Portland in 1905 and was renamed HMS Sapphire but reverting to HMS Imperieuse again in 1909. She was finally scrapped on 24th September 1914.

Displacement 8,400 tons,  Length. 315 feet.  beam 62 feet.  Draught 27.33 feet.   Horsepower 10,000 giving 16.75 knots

Armament. Four 9.2 inch guns,  six 6-inch guns. and six 14-inch torpedo Tubes.    Armour.  Belt amidships 10 inches. with 9 -inch Bulkheads. 8 inch Barbettes, No armour on Lesser Guns. 3 inch protective deck for and aft and on top of belt. 9 inch Conning tower.

HMS Imperieuse pictured pre 1896

A reproduction of this original photo / photo-postcard size 10" x 7" approx available.  Order photograph here  © Walker Archive. Order Code  PHC009

A Holophote on Board HMS Imperieuse 1896

The search-light or Holophote was one of the appliances that the torpedo boat brought into being. Search-lights were used on board ship in peace times for various purposes, such as for signalling at night, but in times of war their principal use would have been in connection with the work for which they were first designed. The working and control of the Holophote was at all times under the electrical staff of the ship. The projectors, situated at various points about the ship, could turn in any direction, electricity being supplied by dynamos down below, and produced by carbons placed within the projector so as to illuminate the concave mirror forming the back of the projector and reflect a perfectly straight beam of light onto any object above the horizon.

Petty Officers on HMS Imperieuse 1896

The Petty Officers, appointed from the lower deck from men of superior education and intelligence, numbered 2 chief petty officers and 31 first- and second-class petty officers, in addition to the artificers and the petty officers of the engine room.

The Marines on HMS Imperieuse 1896

The Marines of the Imperieuse comprised 70 non-commissioned officers and men, gunners and infantry, under a Major and Lieutenant. 

On Board the Imperieuse the Flagship in the Pacific in 1896.

At the head of everyone in the ship is Rear-Admiral Palliser, the Commander-in-Chief on the station, and next to him are the Flag Captain, who is directly in charge of the ship, Captain Adair, and Commander Calthorpe, the chief executive officer, an officer specially promoted for war service off the coast of Africa, and the youngest man of his rank in the Navy in 1896. The total number of officers on the Imperieuse was 43, including 5 warrant officers and the midshipmen and cadets, all of whom appear in the illustration above.  

Original Photographic image from quality magazine published in 1896 image  size 5" x 8" approx , plus title and text. price £15 plus £3 post for UK £10 overseas, recorded airmail  order number AN2/22 order photograph here 

The Forward Barbette of HMS Imperieuse in 1896

The forward barbette of the Imperieuse is shown with its 22 ton gun protected by a redoubt of thick steel.

The Band of HMS Imperieuse 1896.

The ship's band comprised a bandmaster, band corporal, and fifteen musicians, supplemented by volunteers from the crew, and was practically supported by the officers beyond the £15 to £20 annual allowance from the Admiralty. 

The Company of the Imperieuse in 1896

Exclusive of the commissioned and warrant officers on board, the company of the first-class cruiser Imperieuse numbered in all, including various ratings from petty officers downwards, the seamen, artificers, stokers and marines, upwards of 520 men.  They are shown her on or about the forward barbette, where the bow chaser 22 ton gun of the ship is mounted, in 1896. They were allotted and organised in watches and divisions, each man having his own special station and duty to perform - general quarters for action, fire quarters, collision stations, boarding stations, boat stations, closing watertight door stations and so on. The carrying out of these tasks and the practice and drill in regard to them forms the daily routine of life on board ship in the 1890's. This way each year that the ship remained in commission smartness and efficiency increased as did the fighting value of her crew.

Original Photographic image from quality magazine published in 1896 image  size 9" x 8" approx , plus title and specifications. price £20 plus £5 post for UK £10 overseas, recorded airmail  order number AN2/23 order photograph here

A 22 Ton Breechloader in the Imperieuse 1896

Here we see one of the four heavy guns carried by the Imperieuse, the 22-ton gun mounted amidships on the port side, on a sponson projecting over the side of the ship so as to be capable of firing nearly right ahead or astern, as well as on the broadside. The 22-ton gun was designed and introduced originally to arm the Imperieuse and her sister ship the Warspite. It was the smallest type of breechloader carried on ships of the 1890's and could penetrate 17 inches of wrought-iron armour at 2,000 yards range. One of these guns fired the "Jubilee Shot" of 1887, which attained a range of 21,800 yards, or nearly 12 miles. Each gun cost at least £5,000 and fired 144lbs of powder as a charge, with a projectile of 380lbs weight - the round costing £33. The gun could fire practically a round a minute, and could be man handled independently of machinery, and loaded in any position.

Original Photographic image from quality magazine published in 1896 image  size 9" x 8" approx , plus title and specifications. price £20 plus £5 post for UK £10 overseas, recorded airmail  order number AN2/25 order photograph here

 
 

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AVIATION PRINTS

Click above to see all of our aviation art index - Eight random half price aviation items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Aviation Art Offers

 With his personal emblem of black and white fuselage band adorning his Fokker E.V, 153/18, Richard Wenzl briefly commanded Jasta 6, based at Bernes in August 1918, and claimed a modest 6 victories during his career with JG 1. The Fokker E.V was both fast and manoeuvrable, but a series of engine and structural failures meant that these exciting new machines saw only brief service before being re-worked to emerge as the D.VIII, sadly too late to make any impression on the war. Wenzl is shown here in combat with Sopwith Camels of 203 Sqn, assisted by Fokker D.VIIs, which served alongside the E.Vs of Jasta 6. The D.VII shown is that of Ltn d R Erich Just of Jasta 11, also based at Bernes.

Leutnant d R Richard Wenzl by Ivan Berryman.
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 Crew of Lancasters 101 Squadron RAF, stand chatting and drinking cups of tea supplied by the WMCA vans. Delays in Ops for an hour or so allow the crews a chance to light up and have a cup of tea. 101 Squadron based at Ludford Magna were a squadron with a difference, from 1943 the Lancasters were fitted with special radio jamming equipment known as ABC or AirBorne Cigar and carried an eighth crew member known as the special duties operator. Squadron letters were SR and targeted by the Luftwaffe fighters giving 101 Squadron the highest casualty rating in Bomber Command.

Crewing Up by Graeme Lothian. (Y)
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 Pushing the concept of the Spitfire almost to the limit, the sleek F Mk212 represented the ultimate in fighter design at the end of the Second World War. Powered by the mighty Griffon 61 engine driving a five blade propeller, its armament consisted of four 20mm British Hispano Cannon, two in each wing. This example is LA200 (DL-E) of 91 Sqn in 1945.

Spitfire F Mk21 by Ivan Berryman. (E)
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 A pair of Spitfire Mk.IXs of 402 Squadron Royal Canadian Air Force, based at Kenley, practise combat manoeuvres in the skies above Kent in May, 1943.

Spitfire Alley by Ivan Berryman.
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 Schneider CA1 Tanks of the French tenth army spearhead the successful counter offensive against the German army on the river Marne. Overhead a tenacious Junkers JI artillery spotter dogs their tracks. The Second Battle of the Marne, though not an overwhelming victory, spelt the end of German successes on the Western front, and a turning point for the allies.

Tanks on the Marne - France, 18th July 1918 by David Pentland. (P)
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 A Mosquito Mk.BIX above the clouds in late 1943. Mosquito B.IX LR503 holds the record for the most combat missions flown by a single Allied bomber in the Second World War, serving 213 sorties.

A De Havilland Beauty by Ivan Berryman. (C)
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 An SAS team is picked up by a U.S. Army Special Forces Blackhawk helicopter after a successful operation against the Taliban.

Extraction - Afghanistan 2011 by David Pentland. (AP)
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 Designed by the great Ernst Heinkel, the diminutive D.1 was an essential stop-gap that provided the Austro-Hungarian pilots with a front line fighter until they were able to re-equip with Albatros scouts in the Summer of 1917. This little aircraft performed well and was generally held in high regard by its pilots, although it did have some shortcomings, namely that forward vision was extremely limited and the Schwarzloses gun was completely concealed in the overwing pod that made it inaccessible in the air. Most unusual of all was its interplane strut arrangement, designed to reduce drag, which gave it the nicknames Starstrutter or Spider. These examples are shown passing above the German cruiser Derfflinger. 

Brandenburg D.1 by Ivan Berryman. (APB)
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NAVAL PRINTS

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HMS Ark Royal after a recent refit, rejoins the fleet in 2001.

HMS Ark Royal by Ivan Berryman (AP)
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 Developed from the Supermarine Seagull, the Walrus was to prove itself a useful and capable workhorse in almost every theatre of the Second World War. Here, HMS Rodney despatches her Shagbat from the catapult atop C turret.

Ships Company by Ivan Berryman (Y)
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Hawker Sea Furies buzz the stern of HMAS Sydney during fleet exercises off Jervis Bay 1956.

Fly Past by Randall Wilson.
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B114AP. HMS Carmania sinking the German armed liner SS Cap Trafalgar off Ilha da Trindade, South Atlantic. 14th September 1914.  By Ivan Berryman.
HMS Carmania sinking the German armed liner SS Cap Trafalgar off Ilha da Trindade, South Atlantic. 14th September 1914. By Ivan Berryman. (AP)
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  The heavy cruiser HMS Dorsetshire is brought up to sink the blazing wreck of the Bismarck with torpedoes at around 10:30 hours on the morning of May 27th 1941.  The once proud German ship had been ruthlessly pounded into a twisted and burning wreck by the British battleships Rodney and King George V.  HMS Dorsetshire and HMS Maori combed the area of the sinking for survivors, between them picking up a total of 110 out of an original complement of 2,300.

HMS Dorsetshire by Ivan Berryman (P)
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 Besstrashniy (meaning Fearless) 434 heavy rocket ASW Destroyer is shown swinging to the port side of Pyotr Velikiy (meaning Peter the Great) a Kirov Class Cruiser as they clear a path for the carrier Minsk.

Arctic Waters by Randall Wilson. (AP)
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 The pride of the Royal Navy, HMS Hood, leaves Portsmouth on her way to the Fleet Review of King George V in July 1935. HMS Hood is followed by the destroyer HMS Express.

HMS Hood and HMS Express Departing from Portsmouth 1935 by Ivan Berryman. (Y)
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HMS Lion with her sister ship HMS Princess Royal are shown firing on the German High Seas Fleet which can be seen in the distance during the Battle of Jutland.

HMS Lion at the Battle of Jutland by Ivan Berryman (AP)
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MILITARY PRINTS

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 The men of the US 501st Parachute Infantry Regiment ambushed the German 1st Battalion, 6th Fallschrimjager Regiment making their way to Carentan, the Battle of Hells Corner ensued.

Hells Corner, 7th June 1944 by David Pentland. (GL)
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 Robert the Bruces Scots army stand fast as the English knights attack. Robert the Bruce succeeds in defeating the English army at Stirling.  With the full might of Englands army gathered before the besieged Stirling Castle, Edward II Plantagenate is confident of victory. To the west of Bannockburn, Robert Bruce, King of Scots, kneels to pray with his men and commends his soul to God.  Patiently awaiting the coming onslaught in tightly packed schiltroms, his spearmen and archers are well prepared for battle. Unknown to the English, the open marsh of no mans land conceals hidden pits and calthrops, major obstacles for any mounted charge. Despite Cliffords and Beaumonts premature and unsuccessful attempt to relieve Stirling the day before, years of victory have caused the brave English knights to regard their Scottish foes with contempt. So, without waiting for the flower of the forest (archers) to weaken the enemy formations, the order is hurriedly given to attack! With one rush, hundreds of mounted knights led by the impetuous Earl of Gloucester, thunder headlong through the boggy ground straight for the impenetrable mass of spears, hurling themselves into defeat and death. With dash and courage the knights try to force a way through but the infantry stand firm. There is no room to manoeuvre. Everywhere horses and men crash to the ground. Casualties amongst the English nobility are horrific. Bruce seizes the moment and orders the exultant army to advance. The English recoil and are pushed back into the waters of the Bannockburn where many perish in the crush to escape the deadly melee. Edward II, his army destroyed, flees with his bodyguard for the safety of the castle but is refused refuge and has to fight his way south to England. For Robert Bruce and Scotland, victory is complete.

The Battle of Bannockburn by Brian Palmer.
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 Bastogne, Ardennes, Belgium, 20th December 1944.  Newly arrived 81mm Mortars of 2nd Battalion, 506th PIR, 101st Airborne Division, fire in support of U.S. Paratroopers defending against German probes to the north of Bastogne.

Fire for Effect by David Pentland.
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 The charge of the Scots Greys with the Gordon Highlanders holding onto the stirrups. Although this is a point of argument as to the improbability, both regiments concur that this action did happen.

Gordons and Greys to the Front by Stanley Berkeley. (Y)
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 Banikju, Northern Helmand, Afghanistan, 2007. A team from 42 Royal Marines Commando break into a suspected hostile compound during <i>Operation Volcano</i>.

The Hole in the Wall Gang by David Pentland.
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 Painted in the 15th Century, the artist having no concept of military dress of the time of Alexander, painted figures in the armour of the 14/15th centuries.
Battle of Issus by Albrecht Altdorfer. (Y)
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 Private Robert Jones. Decorated for conspicuous bravery and devotion to the wounded at Rorkes drift. Private Robert and William Jones, posted in a room of the Hospital facing the hill, kept up a steady fire against enormous odds, and while one worked to cut a hole through the partition into the next room, the other shot Zulu after Zulu through the loophooled walls, using his own and his comrades rifle alternatively when the barrels became to hot to hold owing to the incessant firing. By their united heroic efforts six out of the seven patients were saved by being carried through the broken partition. the seventh, sergeant Maxwell being delirious, refused to be helped, and on Robert Jones returning to take him by force he found him being stabbed by the Zulus in his bed, Robert Jones died in 1898 in Peterchurch Herefordshire . Both men were awarded the Victoria Cross.

Last Man Out by Mark Churms. (Y)
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Military art print of the Franco-Prussian war showing French Infantry defenders at the fortifications of Champigny.
The Defence of Champigny, November 30th 1870 by Edouard Detaille.
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SPORT PRINTS

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 Sir Bobby played more than 750 games for Manchester United, scoring 247 goals. He also played 106 times for his country and scored a record 49 goals. One of only two Englishmen to have won World Cup and European Cup medals his name will always remain synonymous with some of the greatest moments in the English game.

Sir Bobby Charlton by Gary Keane. (Y)
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Florida Pearl is an Irish-bred race horse, who raced in the late 1990s and early 2000s. Florida Pearl was owned by Mrs Violet O'Leary and trained by top Irish trainer Willie Mullins.  The 2001/02 season proved to be successful for Florida Pearl, winning the John Durkan Memorial Chase.  Florida Pearl then returned to Kempton to win the King George VI Chase beating Best Mate in December.  He returned back to England for his next start in the Grade 2 Martell Cup Chase where he cruised to an 11 length victory over Cyfor Malta.  The painting shows Florida Pearl over the one of the nineteen fences to win the Martell Cup at Aintree in 2002, with Jockey  Barry Geraghty.

Florida Pearl by Stephen Smith.
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This montage shows Trigger winning the Goodwood Cup in 1995, 1997 and 1998.

Double Trigger by Stephen Smith.
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Whilst flat-racing enthusiasts may argue which horse was the best Derby Winner, artist Peter Deighan was deciding for himself, he made a short list of six.  His canvas entitled Derby Winners depicts these six. They include the great Shergar, who ran the fastest Derby in history and won by a record ten lengths.  Also included are Golden Fleece, Reference Point, Teenoso, The Minstrel and the fantastic Nashwan.  Any of these could be classified as the greatest.

Derby Winners by Peter Deighan.
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 Ralf Schumacher winning the first Grand Prix of his career in the Williams FW23. Ralf dominated the San Marino Grand Prix from the first corner to the chequered flag giving Williams its first win since 1997. History was made when the Schumachers became the first brothers in Formula 1 to win a Grand Prix. Imola April 2001.

The Italian Job by Michael Thompson
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Epsom Trophy, Polo Championship

Epsom Trophy by Mark Churms.
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 Ferrari F310.  1996.
Eddie Irvine by Michael Thompson.
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 The Intercontinental Formula was first organised by British Racing Drivers Club to allow the racing of cars with 2000cc to 3000cc engines. At the time the 1500cc limit of Formula 1 had been instituted by the international ruling body in the belief that the smaller cars would mean safer racing. In reality this meant that the relatively easy to handle Formula 1 cars could be driven by less experienced drivers almost as fast as the most experienced master drivers. The result was that the car with fractionally more power was the deciding factor in winning the race, rather than the better driver but this also compromised track safety. The introduction of the Intercontinental Formula was seen as more of a challenge for the drivers, with the larger and more powerful cars requiring greater skill and experience than to drive the 1500cc cars of Formula 1. The 13th International Trophy on Saturday 6th May 1961 was the first race of the season to carry World Championship points and consisted of 80 laps of Silverstone, a total of 233 miles. Stirling Moss, having already won the International Sports Car Race in a Lotus earlier that day, was driving Rob Walkers 2.5 litre Cooper Climax and qualified 2nd on the grid despite being unhappy with the steering of his car. The starting grid front row was Bruce McLaren, Stirling Moss, Jack Brabham and Graham Hill and by the time the race started at 2.30pm a heavy rain meant that the track was not only soaked but also covered in oil and rubber from the previous races. World Champion Jack Brabham made a superb start, passed Moss and was first into Copse and by lap 4 Moss was in 3rd place led by Surtees and Brabham. Due to appalling conditions and poor visibility many of the cars were spinning or leaving the track and by lap 13 Brabham and Moss were 1st and 2nd with the rest of the field some distance behind. Moss now poured on the pressure and for the next few laps he tried to pass as he harried Brabham in a duel for the lead. The pair were now beginning to lap the tailenders and, at around a quarter of the distance Moss was held up by Flockhart, Brabhams team member, who had allowed Brabham to pass. Moss gestured angrily to Flockhart as he was unable to follow Brabham and, as the rain paused for a while the pace became faster. Suddenly and quite dramatically Moss passed both Flockhart and Brabham and within 2 laps had gained 5 seconds on the World Champion. As the rain returned in a deluge Moss mercilessly pushed on, increasing his lead to 1.5 minutes by the halfway mark. Although he could have taken things easily at this point Moss drove on relentlessly at a seemingly impossible pace and was now lapping most of the field for a second time. By the ¾ stage he completed his humiliation of Brabham by passing him for a second time to lap him representing a 3 mile lead. Moss eventually won the race in 2hrs 41 mins 19.2 secs, 1.5 laps ahead of Brabham and at least two laps ahead of the rest of the field in what were treacherous conditions. At the end of the race Moss summed up the experience as a nice ride, having proved himself to be one of the greatest and fastest drivers in the world under any conditions. Sir Stirling Moss believes this to be one of his finest ever drives.

A Moment of Triumph by Gerald Coulson. (Y)
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