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HMS Devastation of the Devastation Class Battleships.  Photographs and history of HMS Devastation

HMS Devastation built at Portsmouth and launched 12th July 1871.  The idea of Sir E J Reed of the Admiralty as an improvement on the old Prince Albert design.  in 1881 Devastation was refitted with improvements in ventilation, and an overhaul of machinery. Devastation underwent modernization in 1890-92 and old guns were replaced with quick-firers and breechloaders. HMS Devastation was removed from the Navy List in 1907, being sold in May 1908.

Armament: four 29 ton guns, six 6 pounder guns and eight 3 pounder quick firers with a partial belt of armour from 12ins to10 ins.   Displacement: 9,330 tons.   I.H.P: 7,000.   Length: 285 ft.   Beam: 62ft 3 ins.   Max Draught: 27ft 6ins.   Speed: 14 knots (after modernisation).   Complement: 410.   

HMS  DEVASTATION 12TH JULY 1871 SOLD  MAY  1908

HMS Devastation in dock, 1873.

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HMS Devastation, 1873.

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HMS Devastation returning from her Gibraltar service c.1902.

The Devastation was one of the earliest ironclad vessels to be built in a public dockyard, and she excited considerable attention at the time. She was thought by many to be too heavy, with sarcastic jokes made about her weight. By 1902 she had served 31 years with the navy. Her Gibraltar station was taken over by HMS Irresistible.

HMS Devastation, 1873.

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HMS Devastation, July, 1894

HMS Devastation - Portguard Ship at Devonport

The Devastation was an iron second-class battleship and was completed for sea in 1873. She was built at Portsmouth Dockyard and engined by Messrs Maudsley, Son & Field. Commissioned at Portsmouth in December 1893 under Captain William M Lang of Fleet Reserve at Devonport.

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HMS Devastation was launched in 1871 and performed well on her first trials. She was originally designed to have two signal masts, one forward and one aft of the turrets but after completion she only had one mast on the superstructure.

The Company of the Devastation 1896

The complete seagoing complement of the Devastation was 410 of all ranks and ratings, but in ordinary conditions there was no need to keep so many men on board. At this time there were portguardships at Portsmouth, Chatham, Devonport, Pembroke, and Queenstown, all seagoing ships. There special duty was to join and act with the coastguard ships, which similarly comprised second-class ironclads and cruisers, as a Reserve Fleet and second line in support of the Channel Squadron. The port and coastguard ships were kept ready at all times to put to sea at short notice, and in cases of emergency would fill up their seagoing complements from the Naval Barracks and Marine Depots at each port, from the Coastguardsmen and Naval Reserve men living at home within clearly defined areas.

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Commander Stewart off Devonport Dockyard

This shows Commandeer Alexander E Stewart in a ships boat off the dockyard.

Devastation in the Hamoze

The Devastation is shown flying the flag of Admiral the Hon Sir Edmund Fremantle, who had just taken up the office of Commander-in-Chief in 1896 at Devonport. 

Petty Officers from the Devastation in 1896

The Chief and first and second class petty officers of the Devastation - all men of tried experience at sea, and specially selected for the Petty Officers rating on account of good character, intelligence and smartness.

Captain Burnard and N.C.O.s Marines 1896

Some of the Marines of the Devastation in 1896 both light infantry and artillerymen, among these is shown the ships postman with his leathern wallet.

The Devastation the Portguard ship at Devonport

The photograph shows Captain William Metcalfe Lang, the distinguished and able officer who organised the Chinese Fleet between the years 1886-1890 until compelled by a disgraceful mandarin intrigue to throw up his appointment - surrounded by the other officers of the ship.

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The following is an extract from the Naval and Military Gazette:

"We hesitated to give currency to reports which reached us during the cruise of the Devastation round the coast with the Channel Squadron, as we had good reason to believe that it was the intention of the Admiralty to pay her off, and berth her in Portsmouth harbour as a tender to the Excellent the advantage of so doing being that a very large number of men passing through the School of Gunnery would thus be enabled to become acquainted with the latest improvements in the turret system ... But since the arrival of the Admiralty of Rear Admiral Hornby, late in command of the Channel Squadron, who certainly should be able to form a correct estimate of the Devastions fitness in every respect for the sea service, it has been determined that she shall be ordered to Gibraltar, there probably to remain during the coming winter as a kind of guardo. A cruise across the bay in the month of November is not looked forward to by the present crew, who have had a little experience both of being stifled by being battened down and of being nearly blown out of their hammocks when efforts at ventilation are made by opening up every hatch. Her qualities as a sea boat have been fairly tested, and the present notion of filling her up with stores for six months further service, and then stowing her away at Gibraltar, leads to the conclusion that on this point at least the value of the counsel of the First Lords new Naval adviser is not altogether apparent."

 
 

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Click above to see all of our aviation art index - Eight random half price aviation items are displayed to the right.

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 With the familiar Lincolnshire countryside beckoning, a Lancaster of the famous 617 Dambusters Squadron, makes its final approach after a raid on Germany, late summer 1944. Gerald Coulsons painting Summer Harvest winds the clock back sixty years, recreating a typical East Anglian countryside scene in late 1944. With the sun well above the horizon, a Lancaster comes thundering in on finals after a gruelling night precision bombing mission over Germany. Below, farm workers busy gathering the summer harvest, stop to marvel at the sheer power and majesty of the mighty aircraft, and to dwell briefly on what horrors its crew may have endured on their perilous journey.

Summer Harvest by Gerald Coulson.
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 easyJet is one of the largest operators of the Airbus A319 with some 142 of the type on its strength.  G-EZAM is depicted beginning its final approach.

easyJet Airbus A319 by Ivan Berryman. (P)
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 A pair of De Havilland Mosquito NF. MkII night fighters of 23 Squadron, based at Bradwell Bay, Essex in 1942.

Night Raiders by Ivan Berryman. (Y)
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 Avro Lancaster AJ-P of Flt. Lt. Martin 617 Squadron releases the bomb that successfully breaches the Mohne dam. In the foreground the electrical substation is burning from a previous attack by Flt.Lt. Hopgood.

GONER 58A - Mohne Dam, Germany, 17th May 1943 by David Pentland. (P)
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After take off a Sunderland of Coastal Command flies low over its base at Rosneath on the Gareloch, as Royal Navy battleships lay at anchor around the naval base of Faslane, near Helensburgh, Scotland during 1945.

Sunderland Over the Gareloch by Geoff Lea.
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 Two Spitfire Mk1Bs of 92 Squadron patrol the south coast from their temporary base at Ford, here passing over the Needles rocks, Isle of Wight, in the Spring of 1942.

In Them We Trust by Ivan Berryman. (C)
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 High above the trenches in April 1918, 74 Squadron engage the famed JG 1 led by the renowned ace baron von Richthofen in his distinctive bright red DR 1. Edward Mick mannock flying a SE5.a diving down top engage another Fokker Dr1 as the red baron flies past momentarily catching each others eyes. The new CO of 74 squadron, major Grid Caldwell MC (bar) New Zealands top ace can be seen above entering the dog fight. But it would be Mannock who would go on to great fame. with 61 confirmed victories and to win the VC, DSO (bar) and MC (bar) After 74 squadron he replaced Billy Bishop of CO 85 Squadron on the 3rd July 1918, scoring 46 victories in the Se5.a He was killed by ground fire near Lestram, France on the 26th July 1918. his Victoria Cross being gazetted on the 18th July 1919. The red baron CO of the Richthofens Flying circus didnt survive the month, also killed by ground fire on the 24th April, he was buried by the Allies with full military honours.

Dawn Dog Fight, Mick Mannock VC by Graeme Lothian.
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 Dodging heavy flak and anti aircraft fire in the skies above Normandy, Douglas C-47s of the 91st Troop Carrier Squadron, 439th Troop Carrier Group see the 101st Airborne Division away on the night of 5th/6th June 1944 at the start of Operation Overlord.  D-Day had arrived.

Leap of Faith by Ivan Berryman.
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On 17th June 1944, 780 miles west of Saipan in Mid Pacific, the Gato class submarine USS Cavalla dives after a lucky sighting of a Japanese Naval Task Force, which included the aircraft carriers Taiho, Shokaku and Zuikaku. The Cavalla then trailed the Japanese, attacking and sinking the Shokaku on the 19th.

A Chance Encounter by Robert Barbour (AP)
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 The mighty Bismarck returns fire to the fast-approaching HMS Hood a the start of a battle that would see both adversaries tragically sunk.

Bismarck Replies to HMS Hood by Ivan Berryman (AP)
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 The Last of the heavy Cruisers built by Germany (5 in total) The picture shows Admiral Hipper making her first sortie on the 18th February 1940, accompanied by the Scharnhorst and the Gneisenau on Operation Nordmark. (Search for allied convoys on the route between Britain and Norway)

The Narvik Squadron by Anthony Saunders. (Y)
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RFA Fort Austin makes a leisurely rendezvous at sunset with the Polaris submarine HMS Renown on patrol somewhere in mid ocean. Soon a rubber inflatable will be launched from the Fort, and mail and fresh fruit and vegetables will be transferred before darkness sets in and makes the operation more hazardous.

The Rendezvous by Robert Barbour.
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 HMS Prince of Wales enters Valetta harbour, Malta.

Enter the Prince by Anthony Saunders. (Y)
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B64.  HMS Centaur Departing Devonport by Ivan Berryman.

HMS Centaur Departing Devonport by Ivan Berryman.
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B61AP.  USS Oakland Escorting the Damaged USS Lexington by Ivan Berryman.
USS Oakland Escorting the Damaged USS Lexington by Ivan Berryman (AP)
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 The cruiser HMS Frobisher dominates this scene off Houlgate at the Normandy landings of 1944.  The monitor HMS Roberts lies beyond Frobisher with a Large Infantry Landing Ship or LSI (L) unshipping its LCAs on the extreme right of the picture.  In the foreground, a motor launch attends a group of LCP (L)s as they head for the French beaches.  Two Spitfire Mk.IXs conduct sweeps overhead as Operation Neptune gathers momentum.

HMS Frobisher and HMS Roberts at Normandy by Ivan Berryman
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 Normandy, Mid-June 1944.  A REME Leyland Retriever mobile workshop truck and M7 Priest SP gun of 33rd Field Regiment, Royal Artillery, 3rd Infantry Division, disembark from an LST at one of the <i>Whale</i> floating roadways that made up the British Mulberry B harbour at Arromanches.

Arromanches by David Pentland. (P)
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CC017. Original art for the poster of the film The Big Red One starring Lee Marvin by Chris Collingwood.

Original art for the poster of the film The Big Red One starring Lee Marvin by Chris Collingwood.
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 Lieutenant of the Royal Navy commands marines and crew during a sea battle with the French during the battle of Cape St Vincent.

In the Thick of Battle by Chris Collingwood.
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Terence Cuneo has depicted a scene of street violence.  The angry mod hurls abuse, missiles and petrol bombs at the soldiers who are outnumbered and restricted in their ability to repsond.  Rioting of this sort became less prevalent through the increased efficiency of the Police and Army in containing it, but Terence Cuneos reconstruction typifies the dangerous situation the secuirty forces in Ulster faced during the 1970s.  Published in 1977 by the Army and Navy Club, Pall Mall, London.

The Tragedy of Ulster 1976 by Terence Cuneo. (B)
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 The Duke of Wellington was blockading the fortress of Ciudad Rodrigo with 32,000 troops. The French sent a force of 45,000 troops under Marshal Andre Massena to relieve the fortress. Wellington took up a strong position at Fuentos DOnoro and the French attacked on May 5th with superior numbers. The British army held their ground with the cost of 1,500 casualties, the French suffered higher losses of 2,200 troops and finally withdrew. The Duke of Wellington quickly seized Almeida.

The 95th Rifle Brigade at the Battle of Fuentes De Onoro, 5th May 1811 by Chris Collingwood. (Y)
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DHM249.  Depicting General La Salle before his last charge before being killed at the Battle of Wagram.

La Salle at the Battle of Wagram by Mark Churms
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Between 18th and 23rd February, 1991, immediately preceding the ground assault, Iraqi defensive positions were bombarded by British and American artillery.  The Artillery Raids took place just inside the Saudi border all along the front line, from the east coast to west of the Wadi al Batin.  The 1st Armoured Division's contribution to the raids was the largest concentration of British artillery since the Second World War.  Further behind the M109 and M110 guns and the locating batteries were the armoured vehicle-mounted rocket launchers of the Multi-Launch Rocket System (MLRS).  39 Heavy Regiment, the only British regiment equipped with MLRS, fired five 'fireplans', one of them at night.  MLRS can ripple-fire 12 rockets in less than one minute.  The Artillery Raids were a major factor in the success of Operation Desert Sword because they contributed to the deception plan by concealing the main point of effort.  The ammunition itself was terrifyingly destructive.  Furthermore, Iraqi morale, already damaged by the air assaults, was crushed by the artillery bombardment.  At the right of the scene a DROPS vehicle of the Royal Corps of Transport is delivering Rocket Pod Containers, and gunners are preparing to re-arm the MLRS.
The Artillery Raids, 18th / 23rd February 1991 by David Rowlands. (GL)
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<b>Ex-display prints in near perfect condition. </b>

King Henry V at the Battle of Agincourt by Sir John Gilbert. (Y)
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Heroes of Goodison Park by Doug Harker. (Y)
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 Valentino Rossi at speed on his Repsol Honda.
Rossi at Speed by Derrick Mark.
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Celebrating Sir Alexs magnificent orchestration of Manchester Uniteds historic treble cup success of 1999.

Sir Alex Ferguson by Darren Baker.
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 Sir Bobby played more than 750 games for Manchester United, scoring 247 goals. He also played 106 times for his country and scored a record 49 goals. One of only two Englishmen to have won World Cup and European Cup medals his name will always remain synonymous with some of the greatest moments in the English game.

Sir Bobby Charlton by Gary Keane. (Y)
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Epsom Trophy, Polo Championship

Epsom Trophy by Mark Churms.
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 It was Saturday 4th May 2002, the Millennium Stadium in Cardiff.  Wonderful goals by Ray Parlour and Freddie Ljungberg for Arsenal were too much for their London rivals Chelsea to capture the FA Cup.  Four days later, on Wednesday 8th, Arsenal rode into Old Trafford.  This time a goal by Sylvain Wiltord on his 100th appearance for the club was enough for Arsene Wenger's team to overcome Manchester United and clinch the Premiership title, maintaining a record of scoring in every league game of the season.  For the second time in four years under their long-serving and inspirational captain Tony Adams, Arsenal had performed the classic double of English football, the third in their history making 2001-02, a season never to be forgotten.

The Double 2001 / 2002 by Gary Keane. (Y)
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 The Intercontinental Formula was first organised by British Racing Drivers Club to allow the racing of cars with 2000cc to 3000cc engines. At the time the 1500cc limit of Formula 1 had been instituted by the international ruling body in the belief that the smaller cars would mean safer racing. In reality this meant that the relatively easy to handle Formula 1 cars could be driven by less experienced drivers almost as fast as the most experienced master drivers. The result was that the car with fractionally more power was the deciding factor in winning the race, rather than the better driver but this also compromised track safety. The introduction of the Intercontinental Formula was seen as more of a challenge for the drivers, with the larger and more powerful cars requiring greater skill and experience than to drive the 1500cc cars of Formula 1. The 13th International Trophy on Saturday 6th May 1961 was the first race of the season to carry World Championship points and consisted of 80 laps of Silverstone, a total of 233 miles. Stirling Moss, having already won the International Sports Car Race in a Lotus earlier that day, was driving Rob Walkers 2.5 litre Cooper Climax and qualified 2nd on the grid despite being unhappy with the steering of his car. The starting grid front row was Bruce McLaren, Stirling Moss, Jack Brabham and Graham Hill and by the time the race started at 2.30pm a heavy rain meant that the track was not only soaked but also covered in oil and rubber from the previous races. World Champion Jack Brabham made a superb start, passed Moss and was first into Copse and by lap 4 Moss was in 3rd place led by Surtees and Brabham. Due to appalling conditions and poor visibility many of the cars were spinning or leaving the track and by lap 13 Brabham and Moss were 1st and 2nd with the rest of the field some distance behind. Moss now poured on the pressure and for the next few laps he tried to pass as he harried Brabham in a duel for the lead. The pair were now beginning to lap the tailenders and, at around a quarter of the distance Moss was held up by Flockhart, Brabhams team member, who had allowed Brabham to pass. Moss gestured angrily to Flockhart as he was unable to follow Brabham and, as the rain paused for a while the pace became faster. Suddenly and quite dramatically Moss passed both Flockhart and Brabham and within 2 laps had gained 5 seconds on the World Champion. As the rain returned in a deluge Moss mercilessly pushed on, increasing his lead to 1.5 minutes by the halfway mark. Although he could have taken things easily at this point Moss drove on relentlessly at a seemingly impossible pace and was now lapping most of the field for a second time. By the  stage he completed his humiliation of Brabham by passing him for a second time to lap him representing a 3 mile lead. Moss eventually won the race in 2hrs 41 mins 19.2 secs, 1.5 laps ahead of Brabham and at least two laps ahead of the rest of the field in what were treacherous conditions. At the end of the race Moss summed up the experience as a nice ride, having proved himself to be one of the greatest and fastest drivers in the world under any conditions. Sir Stirling Moss believes this to be one of his finest ever drives.

A Moment of Triumph by Gerald Coulson. (Y)
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 Ferrari F310.  1996.
Eddie Irvine by Michael Thompson.
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