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Get massive discounts on our aviation clearance sale items! Mostly ex-display items are offered here at vastly reduced prices!

Clearance Aviation Prints

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254 items on 11 pages


The Long Journey Home by Adrian Rigby. (Y)

The Avro lancatser, the backbone of the Royal Air Force Bomber Command during world war two. The Avro Lancaster was a development from the Avro Manchester, and with its four Rolls Royce Merlin engines it was able to carry a substantial bomb load. The Lancaster entered service in 1942, with 44 Squadron based at RAF Waddington and 97 Squadron based at RAF Woodhall Spa. Superior range and payload capability meant the Lancaster was able to strike at the heart of Germany and the factories of their war machine.

Slightly damaged ex-display print with light dust marks on border and top of image - hardly noticeable.

Price : £25.00

SAVING : £35

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Jolly Rogers by Nicolas Trudgian. (Y)

With its macabre skull and crossbones insignia, and a reputation for total disdain of authority, VF-17 arrived in the Pacific with a variety of nicknames ranging from the Irregulars to the Cast-offs, but under the dynamic leadership of their Squadron Commander, Tom Blackburn, VF-17 made their presence felt immediately upon their arrival in the fall of 1943. Equipped with the F4U Corsair, VF-17 pilots had what Blackburn was convinced was the best fighter aircraft of World War II, and on 1st November, during the invasion of Bougainville, VF-17 pilots shot down 6 Japanese planes in their first taste of battle - 2 falling to the guns of their C.O. Over the next 8500 hours of combat in the Solomons, its pilots shot down 156 enemy aircraft, 8 Japanese aircraft for each plane it lost, and produced the highest number of Aces of any squadron in the Navy. Blackburns Fighting 17 were the toast of the Navy brass, earned the respect of their peers, and became known throughout the Pacific as The Jolly Rogers.

Ex-display print with slight damage to the border.

Price : £300.00

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Dawn Sortie by Gerald Coulson. (Y)

With its sleek, graceful design, instantly recognisable by its thin, aerodynamically advanced elliptical wings, the Supermarine Spitfire was the creation of R. J. Mitchell, an aeronautical creative genius. His fighter was to become not only the most important Allied aircraft of World War II, but the most famous British fighter in history. Mitchells design for the Spitfire was so fine that everyone who ever saw it, flew it, or fought in it was captivated for eternity. When American Eagle Squadron ace Jim Goodson transferred from Spitfires to fly his 4th Fighter Group P-47 Thunderbolt, he said it was like moving from a sports car to a truck. I fell in love with her the moment I was introduced. I was captivated by her sheer beauty; she was slimly built with a beautifully proportioned body and graceful curves just where they sohuld be; so said Lord Balfour, Britains under Secreatry of State for War in 1938, not of his wife but of the Spitfire. A sentiment echoed by generations of aviators and enthusiasts ever since. In the hands of an experienced pilot it was nearly invincible, and even legendary Luftwaffe leader Adolf Galland, when asked by Goering what he needed to overcome the RAF, replied: Give me a squadron of Spitfires!. Gerald Coulsons majestic painting captures a pair of Spitfire Mk1s at dawn high above the clouds over southern England in late 1940. An iconic tribute from the artist to the greatest fighter aircraft of all time.

Ex-display prints with slight damage to the border and light scratches on the images.

Price : £110.00

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Evening Patrol by Gerald Coulson. (Y)

During the early part of World War II the coastline of Britain was constantly under threat, particularly the busy shipping lanes of the North Sea. As well as carrying out bombing raids on strategic coastal targets and ports such as Luftflotte 5s attack on the north-east in August 1940, allied shipping was regularly attacked at sea as the Luftwaffe tried to disrupt supplies. The RAF played a vital part in protecting these supplies, escorting fishing fleets and shipping convoys, as well as long range patrols over the sea, seeking enemy activity and intercepting high altitude reconnaissance aircraft. These patrols were often long and arduous with pilots running the gauntlet of, if shot down, ditching into the sea. Often pilots would survive being hit and baling out, only to succumb to the freezing and hostile waters of the North Sea. Often fighter squadrons being rested during the Battle of Britain, would be moved to northern locations such as Acklington and Leconfield, and carry out coastal and sea patrols before returning to the more intense fighting in the south. Flying over the Humber Estuary as the sun is setting, pilots of 610 Sqn return their MKII Spitfires to Leconfield after a convoy patrol late in 1940.

Ex-display prints in near perfect condition with slight damage to the border.

Price : £150.00

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Fireforce External 1979 by John Wynne Hopkins. (Y)

Rhodesian Air Force Paradak drop troops into conflict zone.

Ex display prints with slight damage to border and handling dent on image.

Price : £60.00

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24 Air Mobile by John Wynne Hopkins. (Y)

British infantry are airlifted during major patrols in Northern Ireland during the troubles. The troops are transported by Army Air Corps Lynx helicopters, with a Chinook dropping equipment in the distance.

Ex display prints with some light damage to border area - not noticeable once framed.

Price : £60.00

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The Golden Age by Ivan Berryman. (Y)

Depicting the short S45 Solent 2 G-AHIS (Scapa), BOAC Flying Boat, passing over the Queen Elizabeth on Southampton Water, Late 1940s.

Ex display prints in near perfect condition.

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Home at Dawn by Nicolas Trudgian. (Y)

When No 49 Squadron Lancasters bombed the S.S. barracks at Berchtesgaden on 25th April 1945, its aircrews completed a campaign that had begun 5 and a half years earlier in September, 1939. From the very beginning, 49 Squadron were in the thick of the action with one of their pilots, Roderick Learoyd, winning Bomber Commands first Victoria Cross. In 1942 it was Lancasters of 49 Squadron that led the epic raid on Schneider armament and locomotive works at Le Creusot. In 1943 they flew the shuttle-bombing raids to Friedrichshafen and Spezia, attacked the heavily defended rocket sites at Peenemunde, and in preparation for D-Day, bombarded the coastal batteries in Normandy and the V-1 sites in the caves by the river Loire, north of Paris. Later in 1944 the squadron notably took part in the raid on German Baltic Fleet, continuing to fly important bombing missions against the Nazi war machine until the final collapse of the Third Reich. So it was fitting that an RAF squadron whose history went right back to 1916, should make the coupe de grace at Berchtesgarden. Northern Europes short summer nights, with darkness lasting but a few hours, often saw the RAF bomber crews returning to England at dawn, and it is one such scene which is caught up over the river Orwell at Pin Mill, Lancasters of No. 49 Squadron descend low over Suffolk, heading towards their base at Fiskerton. The night raid on Hamburg is almost completed. Spitfires from No. 129 Squadron, based at Hornchurch, having made an early morning attack on German installations in Holland, have picked up the bombers and escorted them home.

Ex display prints in near perfect condition with some slight damage to the border.

Price : £145.00

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Rocket Attack by Nicolas Trudgian. (Y)

It required more than a little nerve to fly a fighter into the barrage of fire sprayed out by the gunners of a box of B17 bombers; it took even greater courage to do so in the rocket propelled Me163 Komet. With rocket science still in its infancy, these small aircraft were still in the experimental stage, and piloting what amounted to a flying bomb was in itself a perilous business, let alone flying them into combat. But these were desperate times. The day and night bombing assault on Germany was bringing the mighty war machine to its knees, and aything that might help stem the tide was thrown into battle. Powered by a mixture of two highly volatile chemicals, the slightest leak, or heavy landing could cause a huge explosion, and the mix was so corrosive that in the event of even a minor accident, the pilot could literally be dissolved. Sitting in a cramped cockpit, surrounded by dangerous chemicals and ammunition, the intrepid aviator would be launched into the sky on what was, at best, a four minute mission. After, hopefully, engaing the enemy, he would glide powerlessly back to the nearest airfield to be refuelled so as to attempt the hazardous operation all over again. Though limited to a handful of victories, the Komet did make the Allied crews wonder what else the Luftwaffe had hidden up its sleeve, and had the distinction of being the forerunner of aircraft technology that eventually took aircraft into space. Capable of nearly 600mph and climbing to 30,000ft in less than two minutes, this tiny rocket propelled Me163 Komet was typical of Germanys ingenuity in its desperate attempts to stem the havoc being wreaked by the USAAFs daylight bombers.

Ex display prints in near perfect condition.

Price : £80.00

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Mission by Moonlight by Gerald Coulson. (Y)

To commemorate this much-loved and incomparable aircraft, Gerald Coulsons evocative painting depicts a Mosquito B Mk. XVI, a high altitude bomber version, on operations deep over occupied Europe. In this guise the Mosquito was by far the fastest piston-engine bomber of World War II, and also the only light bomber capable of delivering the devastating 4,000lb block-buster bomb.

Ex display prints in near perfect condition.

Price : £95.00

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First Light by Gerald Coulson. (Y)

In Gerald Coulsons fine study First Light, Mk Vb Spitfires of 92 Squadron climb out of Biggin Hill at the outset of an early morning patrol on a cold winters morning in February 1941. Leaving the mist behind as the first beams of light streak across the heavens, they will turn to the east and steel themselves to meet the enemy, high in the dawn sky.

Ex display prints in near perfect condition with a light dent.

Price : £110.00

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Winter Ops by Gerald Coulson. (Y)

Up to 1942 Bomber Command operations were beset by many problems. The means they had to accurately pinpoint the target and assault it were totally lacking, in fact their Commander in Chief, Air Marshall Arthur Harris later wrote : It was glaringly obvious that the average crew in average weather could not find their way to the target. Between February and August 1942 an effort was made to rectify this through the development of a specialised target finding and target marking force, which became known as the Pathfinders. Activated on August 15 this new group was formed under the leadership of their AOC Air Commodore Don Bennett, himself a very experienced pre war pilot with exceptional navigational skills. The aircrews of No. 8 (PFF) Group were tasked with marking out the designated targets but the formation of this group was initially opposed by Harris. He felt that the ranks of his Main Force could be weakened if a high number of experienced and highly skilled crews were taken by this specialist unit, leading to a lessening of skills within the other bomber groups. He agreed however for an alternative scheme whereby complete units were assigned to the Pathfinder Force and the stage was then set for what was to become the Main Offensive of Bomber Command. The first four Squadrons - Nos. 7 (Stirlings) 35 (Halifax) 83 (Lancaster) and 156 (Wellingtons) - were based at a clutch of airfields between Cambridge and Huntingdon. In the absence of any specialist Target Markers the crews were initially forced to operate using standard flares and the early raids produced variable results, with cloud cover often proving the main obstacle in accurate marking. However during the winter of 1942 the introduction of the ground guided marking system, OBOE, marked a quantum leap in accurate target marking and by mid 1943 Pathfinder techniques had been developed for all forms of weather conditions, including nights when complete overcast existed.Pathfinder crews used a combination of personal skill and technical equipment such as H2S to locate their targets. Often flying against overwhelming odds and in appalling conditions they transformed the performance of a bomber force that in 1941 was dropping almost half its bombs on open countryside. This third and final painting in Gerald Coulsons Tribute to Bomber Command depicts Lancaster Bombers of No.8 (PFF) Group returning late after a gruelling operation over Berlin. It is Christmas 1943 and the winter landscape reflects the early morning sunrise as the weary crews approach the safety of their Cambridgeshire base.

Ex display print in near perfect condition with one handling dent and some light damage to border.

Price : £120.00

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Suez Drop, 5th November 1956 by David Pentland. (Y)

RAF Hastings drop men of 3 PARA battalion on the Egyptian airfield of El Gamil as part of the Airborne element of Operation Musketeer, (Anglo-French plan to re-open the Suez Canal after its closure by Egyptian President Nasser) Carried to their target by 18 Valettas and 9 Hastings of RAF Transport Command, and supported by Air strikes by Fleet Air Arm Sea Venoms and Seahawks they quickly succeeded in securing their objective.

One print in near perfect condition reduced to clear

Price : £55.00

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A Hand of Aces by Ivan Berryman. (Y)

Sopwith Camels of 45 Sqn, Istrana, are shown on an early patrol on a crisp morning in the Winter of 1917-18. B6238 was an aircraft shared by Lts E McN Hand and H M Moody, whilst B6354 was the mount of Lt J C B Firth.

Ex display prints in near perfect condition.

Price : £60.00

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Hornet the Hunter by Michael Rondot. (Y)

Military pilots do not easily heap praise on one anothers aircraft but when the object of their attention is the McDonnell F-18 Hornet, they really do talk in superlatives. Whether displaying its awesome manoeuvrability and firepower in the air-to-air combat role, or delivering a hefty warload with unerring accuracy in the ground-attack role, this aircraft has few, if any, equals. Ask any RAF Jaguar pilot from the Gulf War what modifications he would have liked to improve the combat effectiveness of his aircraft, and the answer is invariably the same - Twin fins, bubble canopy, big engines, a powerful multi-mode radar and face-shooting missiles. In other words, Id rather be flying an F-18. Of all the single-seat combat aircraft in service today, the Hornet is universally regarded by those in the know as the most versatile and effective aircraft around. Capable of both ground-attack and day/night all-weather air-to-air missions, the hornet has earned a justifiable reputation as the most sought-after cockpit in the single-seat business. During the months before the outbreak of hostilities in the Gulf War, Hornets flew round-the-clock Combat Air Patrols to provide top cover for Allied fleets. They played a dangerous game of cat and mouse with Iraqi aircraft probing their defenses before turning away, but when the war started it was a different game and in deadly earnest. US Navy and Marine Corps F-18s were among the first Allied aircraft to cross the Iraqi border and they remained in the thick of the fighting throughout the air campaign. In addition to flying escort and sweep missions in support of strike aircraft to and from targets deep within Iraq, Hornets also flew bombing and defence suppression missions and participated in raids on Baghdad. They flew more than 10,000 sorties and 25,000 flight hours during Operation Desert Storm, and shot down two Iraqi MiG 21s to add to the proud McDonnell boast that every enemy fighter shot down in combat was downed by one of their aircraft.

Ex-display prints in near perfect condition.

Price : £70.00

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Chippy Ho by Philip West. (Y)

Chippy Ho and his wingman from VFA-195, hurtle through the sky with Mount Fuji in the background, armed and ready for action at a moments notice. The McDonnell Douglas F-18 became the backbone of the US Navy and Marine Corps for the past twenty years. These two aircraft were based at Kadena AB, Okinawa and their armament consists of AIM-9L Sidewinders, AGM-88 missiles, sensor pods and drop tanks.

Ex-display prints in near perfect condition.

Price : £50.00

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Heading Home by Philip West. (Y)

Having completed yet another sortie, the crew of 101 Sqn Special Operations Lancaster SR-W, piloted by Flt Lt Rusty Waughman, are about to commence the long and hazardous journey back to their base at Ludford Magna, Lincolnshire.

Ex display print with some marks on white border area and some scratches on image.

Price : £75.00

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Eye of the Storm - The Dambusters by Philip West. (Y)

Wing Commander Gibsons aircraft in the foreground and Flt. Lt. Martins in the distance, both draw flak away from Sqn. Ldr. Youngs Lancaster after it has dropped its Bouncing Bomb and makes its escape over the Mohne Dam. Led by Wing Commander Guy Gibson, 19 Lancasters departed their home base in three waves, each aircraft armed with a single bouncing bomb developed by Barnes Wallis. The targets were German dams in the heart of the industrial Ruhr. The resulting attacks breached the Mohne and Eder Dams with attempts also on the Sorpe and Schwelme Dams. For his leadership and courage, Gibson was awarded the Victoria Cross. 34 other men also received decorations.

Ex display print with some marks on white border area and some scratches on image.

Price : £60.00

SAVING : £80

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Channel Dash Heroes by Philip West. (Y)

The Straits of Dover, 12th February 1942. Sub Lieutenant Edgar Lee helps his badly wounded pilot, Sub Lieutenant Brian Rose from the cockpit of their downed Swordfish, before it sinks into the depths of the English Channel following their brave attack on the mighty German fleet. Six Royal Navy Swordfish aircraft manned by 18 aircrew attacked the German warships Scharnhorst, Gneisenau and Prinz Eugen, with their accompanying flotilla of destroyers and motor torpedo boats and top cover provided by deadly fighter aircraft of the Luftwaffe. But only five Swordfish crew survived.

Ex display print with some marks on white border area and some scratches on image.

Price : £55.00

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Third Time Lucky by Ivan Berryman. (YB)

Standing his aircraft at the height of just 60 feet above the waters of the Mohne, Flt Lt Maltby braves a hail of anti-aircraft fire just seconds before the release of the bouncing bomb that would at last breach the dam on that historic night of the 16th/17th May 1943.

Ex display prints in nearly new condition with some slight border damage.

Price : £75.00

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Against All Odds - Attack on the Scharnhorst by Ivan Berryman. (Y)

Swordfish of 825 Sqn led by Lt-Cdr Esmonde begin their heroic attack on the battlescruisers Scharnhorst and Gneisenau and the heavy cruiser Prinz Eugen as they make their way up the English Channel from Brest during Operation Cerberus on 12th February 1942. Although all the aircraft were lost and no significant damage was done to the German fleet, all the pilots were decorated for their bravery and Lt-Cdr Esmonde received the first Fleet Air Arm VC to be awarded, albeit posthumously.

Ex display prints in nearly new condition with some slight border damage.

Price : £60.00

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Pink Tornados by Geoff Lea. (Y)

A pair of RAF Tornado GRIs at low level during the Gulf War operation Desert Storm, in their distinctive desert pink camouflage colour scheme.

Ex display print with some border damage and handling dents.

Price : £50.00

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Phantom FGR 2 of III Squadron by Geoff Lea. (Y)



Ex display print with some border damage and handling dents.

Price : £50.00

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Out of Alex by David Pentland. (Y)

A swordfish from HMS Warspite on patrol off the coast of Egypt, near the port of Alexandria.

Ex display prints with some light damage to border and a couple of light handling dents.

Price : £40.00

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Baron Von Richthofen, March 1918 by Chris Collingwood. (Y)

Germanys greatest First World War fighter ace, Baron Von Richthofen, known as the Red Baron is shown departing his Fokker DR.1 Triplane 425/17 after yet another successful sortie. 425/17 was the aircraft in which the Red Baron finally met his end in April of that year. No fewer than 17 of his victories having been scored in his red-painted triplane.

Ex display prints with some slight damage to border area and light scratch on image.

Price : £90.00

SAVING : £50

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254 items on 11 pages

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