Home ] Up ] Acknowledgements ] How to use our site ]

Askold 

Home ] Up ] General Admiral Class ] Vladimir Monomakh ] Dmitri Donskoi ] Admiral Nakhimov ] Pamiat Azova ] Rurik ] Rossia ] Bayan Class ] Admiral Kornilov ] Variag ] [ Askold ] Novik ] Boyarin ] Pallada Class ] Gromoboi ] Bogatyr Class ] Svetlana Class ] Admiral Nakhimov Class ] Tallin ] Svietlana ] Rurik ]

Choose the navy or section of interest below:

Royal Navy United States Germany France Japan Italy Russia Austria-Hungary
Canada Spain Netherlands Argentina Brazil Portugal Turkey Australia
Norway Sweden Denmark Belgium Chile Uruguay China New Zealand
Malta Greece India Poland South Africa Pakistan Libya Kuwait
Ireland Other Navies Liners   Unidentified Ships Wartime Naval Losses


Customer Helpline (UK) : 01436 820269
Subscribe to our Newsletter!

You currently have no items in your basket

Choose a FREE print if you spend over £220!
See Choice of Free Prints

Payment Options Display
Buy with confidence and security!
Publishing historical art since 1985

Google

 

Web

www.battleships-cruisers.co.uk

 

Askold Cruiser

Askold was the fastest of the larger Russian Cruisers.  In World War One she was seized by the British in the White Sea, and commissioned as Glory IV in August 1918, having previously served in the Mediterranean

Askold March 1900 Served in the Mediterranean and then White Sea until captured by the Royal Navy and renamed Glory IV. Scrapped 1921.
 

Askold .Submitted by George Williams

Askold, 1900.

From the collection of Dmitry Lemachko

Askold.

From the collection of Dmitry Lemachko

Askold.

From the collection of Dmitry Lemachko

Askold, under British flag.

From the collection of Dmitry Lemachko

Askold.

From the collection of Dmitry Lemachko

Askold.

From the collection of Dmitry Lemachko

Askold.

From the collection of Dmitry Lemachko

Askold.

From the collection of Dmitry Lemachko

Askold.

From the collection of Dmitry Lemachko

Askold.

From the collection of Dmitry Lemachko

Askold.

From the collection of Dmitry Lemachko

Askold.

From the collection of Dmitry Lemachko

Askold.

From the collection of Dmitry Lemachko

Askold.

From the collection of Dmitry Lemachko

Askold.

From the collection of Dmitry Lemachko

Askold.

From the collection of Dmitry Lemachko

Askold.

From the collection of Dmitry Lemachko

Askold, Shanghai, 1905.

From the collection of Dmitry Lemachko

Askold.

From the collection of Dmitry Lemachko

Askold.

From the collection of Dmitry Lemachko

Askold.

From the collection of Dmitry Lemachko

Askold.

From the collection of Dmitry Lemachko

Askold. 

From the collection of Dmitry Lemachko

Askold.

From the collection of Dmitry Lemachko

Askold.

From the collection of Dmitry Lemachko

Askold.

From the collection of Dmitry Lemachko

Askold.

From the collection of Dmitry Lemachko

Askold, Port Arthur.

From the collection of Dmitry Lemachko

Askold (postcard).

From the collection of Dmitry Lemachko

Askold, 1900.

From the collection of Dmitry Lemachko

Askold, 1900.

From the collection of Dmitry Lemachko

Askold.

From the collection of Dmitry Lemachko

Askold, launch in Germany.

From the collection of Dmitry Lemachko

Askold, 1914.

From the collection of Dmitry Lemachko

Askold.

From the collection of Dmitry Lemachko

Askold.

From the collection of Dmitry Lemachko

 

Askold.

From the collection of Dmitry Lemachko

Askold.

From the collection of Dmitry Lemachko

Askold, Vladivostok, 1906.

From the collection of Dmitry Lemachko

Askold.

From the collection of Dmitry Lemachko

Askold.

From the collection of Dmitry Lemachko

Askold.

From the collection of Dmitry Lemachko

Askold.

From the collection of Dmitry Lemachko

Askold.

From the collection of Dmitry Lemachko

Askold.

From the collection of Dmitry Lemachko

Askold.

From the collection of Dmitry Lemachko

Askold.

From the collection of Dmitry Lemachko

Askold.

From the collection of Dmitry Lemachko

Askold.

From the collection of Dmitry Lemachko

Askold.

From the collection of Dmitry Lemachko

Askold.

From the collection of Dmitry Lemachko

Askold.

From the collection of Dmitry Lemachko

Askold.

From the collection of Dmitry Lemachko

Askold.

From the collection of Dmitry Lemachko

skold.

From the collection of Dmitry Lemachko

Askold.

From the collection of Dmitry Lemachko

Askold, Whiteson, 1918.

From the collection of Dmitry Lemachko

Askold.

From the collection of Dmitry Lemachko

Askold.

From the collection of Dmitry Lemachko

Askold.

From the collection of Dmitry Lemachko

Askold.

From the collection of Dmitry Lemachko

Askold.

From the collection of Dmitry Lemachko

Askold.

From the collection of Dmitry Lemachko

Askold.

From the collection of Dmitry Lemachko

 

Valuations

Classified Ads Terms and Conditions Shipping Info Contact Details

 

 

Click here to go to our naval history forum

 

AVIATION PRINTS

Click above to see all of our aviation art index - Eight random half price aviation items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Aviation Art Offers

 Whilst flying with other Hawker Tempests of 274 Sqn on 11th February 1945, Sqn Ldr David Fairbanks spotted a lone Arado Ar234 of the Kommando Sperling 1 (F) / 123 flown by Hauptmann Hans Felde returning to its base at Rheine.  A desperate chase commenced through the cloudbase until the German jet prepared to land, whereupon Fairbanks sent 4U+DH down in flames after a single short burst of his four 20mm cannon.

Tribute to Sqn Ldr David Fairbanks by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - £1000.00
 When the American Army reached the Rhine at Remagen on March 7, 1945, such was the speed of their advance, they arrived before the retreating Germans had time to blow the vital bridge. The Americans seized the bridge intact. Realising the threat to the German defences, the Luftwaffe were ordered into destroy the bridge at all costs. Desperate efforts were made to attack the bridge, and over the course of the following days the fighting became one of the legendary battles of the war. Two RAF Tempests have flown right through the Luftwaffe formation of Me262 and Arado 234 jets bombers, the high speed aircraft missing each other by feet. The concentration of the desperate attackers is broken momentarily, sufficiently so that their bombs miss the target - but more Luftwaffe aircraft can be seen streaming into attack

Clash Over Remagen by Nicolas Trudgian. (Y)
Half Price! - £120.00
 A Gloster Gladiator MkII of 247 Sqn is depicted patrolling off the Cornish coast in August 1940 during which time this squadron became the only one to operate the Gladiator in the defence of the South of England during the Battle of Britain.

Lone Gladiator†by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - £500.00
 An Avro Anson comes under attack from an Me109.

Avro Anson by Ivan Berryman. (AP)
Half Price! - £52.50

Depicting Dauntless and Devastator attacking the Japanese aircraft carrier Akagi during the Battle of Midway.

Midway - The Setting Sun by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £55.00
 With the familiar Lincolnshire countryside beckoning, a Lancaster of the famous 617 Dambusters Squadron, makes its final approach after a raid on Germany, late summer 1944. Gerald Coulsons painting Summer Harvest winds the clock back sixty years, recreating a typical East Anglian countryside scene in late 1944. With the sun well above the horizon, a Lancaster comes thundering in on finals after a gruelling night precision bombing mission over Germany. Below, farm workers busy gathering the summer harvest, stop to marvel at the sheer power and majesty of the mighty aircraft, and to dwell briefly on what horrors its crew may have endured on their perilous journey.

Summer Harvest by Gerald Coulson.
Half Price! - £140.00
 Designed by the great Ernst Heinkel, the diminutive D.1 was an essential stop-gap that provided the Austro-Hungarian pilots with a front line fighter until they were able to re-equip with Albatros scouts in the Summer of 1917. This little aircraft performed well and was generally held in high regard by its pilots, although it did have some shortcomings, namely that forward vision was extremely limited and the Schwarzloses gun was completely concealed in the overwing pod that made it inaccessible in the air. Most unusual of all was its interplane strut arrangement, designed to reduce drag, which gave it the nicknames Starstrutter or Spider. These examples are shown passing above the German cruiser Derfflinger.†

Brandenburg D.1 by Ivan Berryman. (AP)
Half Price! - £140.00
 Sadly, but two examples of the Handly page Halifax exist today - the unrestored W1048 at the RAF Museum at Hendon, and the Yorkshire Air Museums pristine LV907 Friday the 13th, a rebuild from the remains of HR792. In this portrait of one of Bomber Commands oft-forgotten workhorses, the original Friday the 13th is set against a stunning evening cloudscape.

Friday the 13th by Ivan Berryman. (Y)
Half Price! - £50.00

 

NAVAL PRINTS

Click above to see all of our naval art index - Eight random half price naval items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Naval Art Offers

 HMS Intrepid embarks some of her landing craft during the Falklands conflict of 1982.
HMS Intrepid by Ivan Berryman
Half Price! - £15.00
Seen here from the deck of an escorting destroyer.
HMS Prince of Wales by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £30.00
B146.  HMS Jamaica by Ivan Berryman.

HMS Jamaica by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £15.00
 Viewed from beneath the blistered guns of the damaged X and Y turrets of her sister HMS Ajax, Achilles come sunder fire from the pocket battleship Admiral Graf Spee during what was to become known as the Battle of the River Plate on the 13th December 1939. Shells from Achilles are closing on her opponent as the Graf Spee alters course at the start of the doomed battleships flight to Montevideo.

The Pursuit of the Graf Spee by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £50.00

 USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) refuels an Adams class Destroyer during a dusk operation off the Vietnam coast as a pair of E8 Crusaders are readied for launch on the forward catapults.

USS Kitty Hawk by Ivan Berryman (P)
Half Price! - £2750.00
 The largest and fastest of all the ships that took part in the Battle of Jutland, the elegant battle cruiser HMS Tiger was launched in 1913 and is easily recognisable by the unusual position of Q turret just aft of the third funnel, She is shown about  to pass beneath the Forth Bridge as she departs Rosyth for a sea trial

HMS Tiger by Ivan Berryman
Half Price! - £15.00
Two F14 Tomcats of VF-1 pass in close formation over the stern of the veteran USS Ranger (CV-61)

USS Ranger by Ivan Berryman. (Y)
Half Price! - £295.00
 The battered Bismarck fires its final salvos, during the last stage of the battle, 27th May 1941.
Death of the Bismarck by Brian Wood.
Half Price! - £50.00

 

MILITARY PRINTS

Click above to see all of our military art index - Eight random half price military items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Military Art Offers

 St Mere Eglise, Normandy, 6th June 1944.  U.S. Paratroops of the 82nd <i>All American</i> Airborne Division, descend on occupied France.

First to Fight by David Pentland. (AP)
Half Price! - £95.00
The six-pounder guns of Captain C.D. Sillerys Company, 7th Battalion Royal Artillery were in the centre of the British line, firing round shot and case shot into the advancing columns of French infantry.

The Battle of Talavera, 27th-28th July 1809 by David Rowlands (GS)
Half Price! - £250.00
 French domination of Europe could never be assured without Britains defeat. Had he defeated Russia, Napoleon may have been able to launch an invasion of England in 1813. Using American designed paddle steamers.

Napoleons Dream by Mark Churms.
Half Price! - £20.00
This is my personal interpretation of the events immediately following the Battle of Culloden. There is no intention to depict either the shores of LochNam-Uarnh, the Highlands, glens or castles with geographic accuracy. Instead I have tried to portray the scenes following the first 3 days of the battle, the escape of Bonnie Prince Charlie, the destruction and brutality wreaked upon the Highlands and the real sufferers, women and the innocent. 1 . The battlefield scene represents the time from plundering and butchering the wounded to when the ordinary people were allowed on to collect their dead. In the main central figure I have tried to impart a feeling of stoic dignity in the face of an uncertain future 2. The top section represents the form of Prince Charles. Despite the flames and carnage of Culloden, he is firmly supported in the hand of his Jacobite faithful to his safe exile aboard a French warship. Being mindfull that Clan tartans were not in common usage as uniforms of war at the time, only one tartan has been represented as such, that of the Royal Stewart, and that only to signify Charles claim to the thrones of England and Scotland. With his leaving, the sett fades as does he and his ambition. The burning, smouldering tartans signify the proscription of tartans, kilts, plaids etc by Westminster to discourage further rebellion. 3. With the Clans and their regiments broken, neither the natural barrier of the Highlands nor the great chiefs castles would prevent the poison of Culloden seeping into every glen or the fury of Cumberlands dragoons plundering at will. This is represented in the lower section. Armed with sword, manacles and the noose, these, Cumberlands most pitiless embarked on an orgy of murder, rape and pillage. The abyss of prison or exile awaited those suspected of Jacobite sympathies, the gallows for more serious resistance. Battles are fought and won, or lost, as all battles are, but Cullodens aftermath changed Scottish Highland society forever, ushering in a long period of suffering. This painting is my humble attempt to interpret that tragic period.

Culloden the Aftermath by Brian Wood (GL)
Half Price! - £370.00

 With Fixed Bayonets soldiers of 2nd battalion Scots Guards clear enemy positions of 5th Argentine Marine Battalion on the slopes of Tumbledown

Battle for Tumbledown by Mark Churms. (P)
Half Price! - £3100.00
 The year is 1807, the French Empire is at the pinnacle of its power. Although not yet 38 years of age the Emperor Napoleon Bonaparte is marching towards the heights of his military career. It is the anniversary of his great victory against the Austrians at Marengo seven years before. Since then the soldiers of The Grand Armee have faithfully followed The Little Corporal from victory to victory across Europe.  Now, in eastern Prussia, the Russians alone are holding out against the might of France. Bennigsens army is strung out on a four mile front along the banks of the river Alle, near the town of Friedland. With their backs to the unfordable river the brave Russian soldiers are drawn up in a poor position to give battle.  It is already midday when Napoleon arrives on the field. Much of the French force is still some miles away but the commanders keen eye immediately perceives an opportunity for victory. He decides to attack. The vigourous assault on the Russian lines commences at about 5.30 pm. Bennigsen, anticipating an engagement on the following day, is completely surprised by this ferocious attack so late in the afternoon. The fighting begins as his divisions are preparing to withdraw across the river Alle, to a stronger position. Napoleons master stroke throws the enemy into confusion. By 8.30 pm the French are masters of the field, the Russians have lost nearly a third of their army and 80 cannons. The town of Friedland is ablaze and the Tsars army in full retreat.  In simple attire and characteristically astride a nimble arab grey, Napoleon Bonaparte rides forward with his reserves of the Guard to survey the final victory.  Within a few days the defeated Tsar Alexander will embrace the French Emperor on a raft anchored in the middle of the Niemen at Tilsit. At their monumental meeting they will talk of peace, co-operation against the British, the division of Prussian Territories and France with Russia will form their uneasy alliance that will quickly collapse into open hostility and present Napoleon with his greatest challenge: The invasion of Russia itself.

Napoleon at Friedland by Mark Churms. (AP)
Half Price! - £95.00
9th (Irish) Field Battery firing on the Run-in-shoot to Queen Beach. They were the first rounds fired at the Normandy Coast, D-Day 6th June, 1944. Queen Beach, one of the 4 sectors of Sword Beach, where most of the landings of D-Day were carried out. The Queen Beach sector which extended for 1.5km between Lion-sur-Mer and the western edge of Ouistretham. The attack was thus concentrated on a narrow one-brigade front. For once the DD tanks and other armour came in exactly on time and ahead of the infantry. The 8th brigade, with the 1st Battalion of the South Lancashire Regiment on the right and the 2nd East Yorkshire on the left.

Operation Overlord by David Rowlands (B)
Half Price! - £20.00
 Captain F Macbeans Company, 1st Battalion Royal Artillery in action on the right of the British line, firing its 12 pounder guns against French Cavalry and Infantry. By permission of David Rowlands. Battle of Minden 1st August 1759. Major battle of the Seven years war. After the French victory in April at Bergen, The French Army 60,000 strong under the command of Duc Louis de Contades marched northwards towards Hanover. To block this French Advance the Prussian Army under Field Marshall The Duke of Brunswick decided to hold the line at Minden. The Duke of Brunswick could only raise a force of 45,000 men including a British Contingent under Lord George Sackville of 6 regiments, a detachment of cavalry and some artillery. The French opened the battle attacking, the British Infantry regiments probably due to a misunderstanding, advanced and they were followed by the Hanoverian Infantry. They attacked the French cavalry. The Infantry advanced only stopping to let off a volleys of fire. This unconventional use of Infantry against cavalry, the French force confused and suffering losses broke. The victory was in Ferdinands grasp, he ordered his cavalry forward but the British general Sackville refused to send his cavalry after the French. For this action he was later court-martialled by King George II and cashiered from the army. The French were able to withdraw in order, but their losses had been 7,000 men and 43 artillery guns. The British and Hanoverian losses were less than 3,000 with 1500 of these casualties inflicted on the British Infantry. This battle ended all French hopes of capturing Hanover. British Regiments at Minden. 12th of Foot. (Suffolk Regiment) 20th Foot. (Lancashire Fusiliers ) 23rd of Foot. (Welch Fusiliers), 25th of Foot, (Kings own Scottish Borderers), 37th of Foot. (Royal Hampshire Regiment), 51st Foot (Kings own Yorkshire Light Infantry)

The Battle of Minden, 1st August 1759 by David Rowlands. (Y)
Half Price! - £40.00

 

SPORT PRINTS

Click above to see all of our sport art index - Eight random half price sport items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Sport Art Offers

 England Captain martin Johnson lifts the World Rugby Cup, as winners of the 2003 World Rugby Cup in Australia.

Martin Johnson by Chris Howells.
Half Price! - £45.00
 Colin Edwards gave Honda racing another victory with an inspired performance during the last race of the season to put rival Troy Bayliss into second place. Bobs painting depicts the typically-aggressive cornering style of the Texas Tornado in his winning leathers as he threw the mighty Honda around the Imola racing circuit.

Down to the Wire by Robert Tomlin.
Half Price! - £60.00
 Marcus Gronholm.  Peugeot 206 WRC.
Reflections of a Champion by Michael Thompson.
Half Price! - £30.00
 Richard Burns and Robert Reid.  Subaru Impreza WRC 99
Rain or Shine by Michael Thompson
Half Price! - £30.00

David Coulthard made his Grand Prix debut at the Spanish Grand Prix in 1994.  Only an electrical problem with his Williams Renault stopped Coulthard finishing 3rd in his first ever Grand Prix.  This performance was enough to confirm his potential and earn a drive for the 1995 season.  Winning at Estoril, on the podium at Interlagos, Magny-Cours, Silverstone, Hockenheim, Hungaroring and T I Aida, placed him third in the championship in his first full Grand Prix season.  Coulthard moved to McLaren for the 1996 season proving on many occasions that he could match the pace of team leader Mika Hakkinen, who has a reputation as one of the fastest.  For 1997, Coulthard took over the mantle of Britains No.1 driver and was well qualified to do so.  Winning at Melbourne and Monza, second at A1 Ring and Jerez.  Fourth in the championship prior to Schumachers exclusion.  Coulthard drives with a balance of flair and aggression which earned him considerable respect.  After nearly fifteen years as a top flight driver, Coulthard has now retired from driving, leaving a remarkable legacy behind him.  Twice winner of the British Grand Prix in 1999 and 2000, he has represented Scotland and Great Britain at the highest level of motorsport for well over a decade.

Tribute to David Coulthard by Stuart McIntyre
Half Price! - £23.00
DHM1480. Jenson Button 2004 BAR 006 by Ivan Berryman.
Jenson Button 2004 BAR 006 by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £50.00
 A quartet of Ferrari 801s are warmed up at Rouen-les-Essarts.  French Grand Prix 1957.

Thoroughbreds in the Paddock by Ray Goldsbrough.
Half Price! - £75.00
Marcus Gronholm wins the 2002 Rally New Zealand in the Peugeot 206 and gains the World Rally Championship Title, October 2002.
Finnish First by Graham Bosworth. (Y)
Half Price! - £100.00

Everything we obtain for this site is shown on the site, we do not have any more photos, crew lists or further information on any of the ships.

COPYRIGHT NOTICE. ALL IMAGES DISPLAYED ON THIS WEBSITE ARE PROTECTED BY  COPYRIGHT  LAW, AND ARE OWNED BY CRANSTON FINE ARTS OR THEIR RESPECTIVE OWNERS.  NO REPRODUCTION OR COPYING ALLOWED ON OTHER WEBSITES, BOOKS OR ARTICLES WITHOUT PRIOR AGREEMENT.

This website is owned by Cranston Fine Arts.  Torwood House, Torwoodhill Road, Rhu, Helensburgh, Scotland, G848LE

Contact: Tel: (+44) (0) 1436 820269.  Fax: (+44) (0) 1436 820473. Email:

Return to Home Page