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Admiral Nakhimov 

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Admiral Nakhimov, Armoured Cruiser

Copied form the design of HMS Imperieuse. Built at the Baltic naval works, and laid down in July 1884, launched 2nd November 1885. and completed 15th December 1887. The Admiral Nakhimov was modernized in a refit in 1899 with new boilers being fitted./  Took part in the |Battle of Tsushima. During the days fighting the cruisers did not receive much damage but during the night she was torpedoed and the crew scuttled the cruiser in the morning before surrendering to the Japanese.

Displacement: 8524 tons,  Speed: 17 Knots.  Crew 570  Armament: Eight 8 inch guns (in pairs) Ten single 6 inch guns,  twelve 3 pdt quick firing guns,.  Six 1 pdr.  Three 15-inch torpedo tubes.

Admiral Nakhimov November 1885 Scuttled on 28th May 1905 after being torpedoed by the Japanese.
 

Admiral Nakhimov, 2nd September 1902.

From the collection of Dmitry Lemachko

Admiral Nakhimov.

From the collection of Dmitry Lemachko

Admiral Nakhimov.

From the collection of Dmitry Lemachko

Admiral Nakhimov.

From the collection of Dmitry Lemachko

Admiral Nakhimov.

From the collection of Dmitry Lemachko

Admiral Nakhimov.

From the collection of Dmitry Lemachko

Admiral Nakhimov.

From the collection of Dmitry Lemachko

Admiral Nakhimov.

From the collection of Dmitry Lemachko

Admiral Nakhimov.

From the collection of Dmitry Lemachko

Admiral Nakhimov.

From the collection of Dmitry Lemachko

Admiral Nakhimov.

From the collection of Dmitry Lemachko

Admiral Nakhimov.

From the collection of Dmitry Lemachko

Admiral Nakhimov.

From the collection of Dmitry Lemachko

Admiral Nakhimov, 1885.

From the collection of Dmitry Lemachko

Admiral Nakhimov.

From the collection of Dmitry Lemachko

Admiral Nakhimov.

From the collection of Dmitry Lemachko

Admiral Nakhimov.

From the collection of Dmitry Lemachko

Admiral Nakhimov, in New York.

From the collection of Dmitry Lemachko

Admiral Nakhimov.

From the collection of Dmitry Lemachko

Admiral Nakhimov.

From the collection of Dmitry Lemachko

Admiral Nakhimov.

From the collection of Dmitry Lemachko

Admiral Nakhimov.

From the collection of Dmitry Lemachko

Admiral Nakhimov.

From the collection of Dmitry Lemachko

Admiral Nakhimov.

From the collection of Dmitry Lemachko

Admiral Nakhimov.

From the collection of Dmitry Lemachko

Admiral Nakhimov.

From the collection of Dmitry Lemachko

Admiral Nakhimov.

From the collection of Dmitry Lemachko

Admiral Nakhimov.

From the collection of Dmitry Lemachko

Admiral Nakhimov.

From the collection of Dmitry Lemachko

Admiral Nakhimov, 21st October 1885.

From the collection of Dmitry Lemachko

Admiral Nakhimov.

From the collection of Dmitry Lemachko

Admiral Nakhimov.

From the collection of Dmitry Lemachko

Admiral Nakhimov 1885.

From the collection of Dmitry Lemachko

 

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AVIATION PRINTS

Click above to see all of our aviation art index - Eight random half price aviation items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Aviation Art Offers

 Pushing the concept of the Spitfire almost to the limit, the sleek F Mk212 represented the ultimate in fighter design at the end of the Second World War. Powered by the mighty Griffon 61 engine driving a five blade propeller, its armament consisted of four 20mm British Hispano Cannon, two in each wing. This example is LA200 (DL-E) of 91 Sqn in 1945.

Spitfire F Mk21 by Ivan Berryman. (E)
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 Lockheed Vega PV-1 VB32 Squadron in the Santaren Channel. From this point on the U-boat was hunted and harassed only to be sunk in the Bay of Biscay.

The Hunt for U-Boat 134 by David Pentland.
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 Flying Officer Eric Loveland and his navigator Sergeant Jack Duffy of No.68 Squadron intercept a German Ju88 intruder on the night of March 17th 1945.

Moonlight Serenade by Troy White.
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 Spitfires of No. 132 Squadron rush towards the Front to give ground support to the advancing Allied forces following breakout from the Normandy beaches, June 1944. <br><br><b>Published 2003.<br><br>Signed by three highly decorated fighter pilots who flew combat missions on D-Day, 6 June 1944, and during the Battle for Normandy.</b>

Normandy Breakout by Nicolas Trudgian. (Y)
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 The afternoon of 25th July 1940 was a desperate one for the already exhausted fighter pilots of the RAF defending the South coast of England.  As convoy CW8 made its way through the English Channel, sixty JU.87 Stukas and forty JU.88 bombers launched a brutal attack on the ships below, backed up by fighter cover of over 50 Messerscmitt Bf.109s.  Eight Spitfires of 64 Sqn (Kenley) were scrambled, together with twelve Spitfires of 54 Sqn (Hornchurch) and Hurricanes of 111 Sqn from Croydon.  The British pilots found themselves massively outnumbered, but nevertheless put up a spirited fight against the teeming enemy.  This painting shows Spitfires of 54 Sqn entering the fray, the pilots scattering as they choose their targets and go after the JU.87s. To the right of this, Bf.109Es of JG.26 are roaring in to join battle, whilst Adolf Gallands aircraft engages a Hurricane of 111 Sqn.

A Day for Heroes by Ivan Berryman.
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 With 39 confirmed victories to his credit, Major John Gilmour is also recognised as the joint highest scoring pilot on the Martinsyde G.100 Elephant, an unusual score given the poor performance of this aircraft in one-on-one combat. He was awarded the DSO, MC and 2 Bars during the course of his flying career and in 1917 was posted to 65 Squadron as Flight Commander flying Sopwith Camels. On 1st July 1918, he downed three Fokker D.VIIs, a Pfalz and an Albatros D.V in the space of just 45 minutes.  In 1918 he was promoted to the rank of major and posted to command 28 Squadron in Italy, staying with the trusty Camel, but he did not add further to his score, although his final un-confirmed total may have been as high as 44. He is depicted here claiming his second kill on 24th September 1916 when he destroyed a Fokker E.1 whilst flying Elephant No 7284.

Major John Gilmour by Ivan Berryman. (GL)
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 En route to the dams of the Ruhr Valley, the first wave of three specially adapted Avro Lancasters roar across the Dutch wetlands on the night of 16 -17th May 1943 led by Wing Commander Guy Gibson, their mission to breach the Mohne and Eder dams, thus robbing the German war machine of valuable hydro-electric power and disrupting the water supply to the entire area. Carrying their unique, Barnes Wallis designed 'Bouncing Bomb' and flying at just 30m above the ground to avoid radar detection, 617 Squadron's Lancasters forged their way into the enemy territories, following the canals of the Netherlands and flying through forest fire traps below treetop height to their targets. Gibson's aircraft ('G'-George) is nearest with 'M'-Mother of Fl/Lt Hopgood off his port wing and 'P'-Peter (Popsie) of Fl/Lt Martin in the distance.

Dambusters - The First Wave by Ivan Berryman. (Y)
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 Group Captain Byron Duckenfield on patrol in Hurricane P3059 of No.501 Squadron during the Battle of Britain.

501 Squadron Hurricanes by Ivan Berryman. (P)
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NAVAL PRINTS

Click above to see all of our naval art index - Eight random half price naval items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Naval Art Offers

 USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) refuels an Adams class Destroyer during a dusk operation off the Vietnam coast as a pair of E8 Crusaders are readied for launch on the forward catapults.

USS Kitty Hawk by Ivan Berryman (P)
Half Price! - £2750.00
Originally constructed as a Home Fleet Repair Ship, HMS Cyclops was later converted into a submarine depot ship and enjoyed a long career, both in the Mediterranean and in home waters.  Here she prepares to receive HMS Sceptre.  Another S-class submarine is already tethered alongside.

HMS Cyclops Prepares to Receive HMS Sceptre by Ivan Berryman (P)
Half Price! - £500.00
 Mitsubishi G4Ms of 27 Kanoya Kokutai begin their devastating attack on Force Z off the north east coast of Malaya on 10th December 1941. Both Repulse and prince of Wales were lost in the attack, while their accompanying destroyers remained to pick up survivors among them HMS Express which can be seen off HMS Repulse starboard quarter.

HMS Repulse with HMS Prince of Wales Under Attack by Ivan Berryman. (Y)
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 Lieutenant of the Royal Navy commands marines and crew during a sea battle with the French during the battle of Cape St Vincent.

In the Thick of Battle by Chris Collingwood.
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 Fully dressed and resplendent, HMS Hood is pictured preparing for King George Vs review of the Fleet in July 1935 as other capital ships take up their positions around her. Ramillies can be seen off Hoods port bow, Resolution astern, whilst just beyond her boat deck, the mighty Nelson gently nudges into position.

HMS Hood During the Fleet Review of 1935 by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £15.00
The King George V class battleship HMS Anson is pictured in Sydney Harbour where she joined the Pacific Fleet in July 1945, viewed across the flight deck of HMS Vengeance, where ten of her Vought F4.U Corsairs are ranged in front of a single folded Fairey Barracuda
HMS Anson at Sydney Harbour, July 1945 by Ivan Berryman.
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 Key ships of the British task Force sail in close formation in the Mediterranean Sea during the build-up to the coalition liberation of Iraq in march 2003. Ships pictured left to right, include ATS Argus (A135), a Type 42 destroyer in the extreme distance, the flagship HMS ark Royal (RO7), RFA Orangeleaf (A110), LSL Sir Percival (L3036), the Commando and helicopter carrier HMS ocean (L12) and the Type 42 destroyer HMS Liverpool (D92) 

NTG03 - Task Force to Iraq by Ivan Berryman (P)
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Erich Topps notorious Red Devil Boat, U-552, slips quietly away from the scene of another victory in the North Atlantic in 1941.

U-552 by Ivan Berryman. (P)
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MILITARY PRINTS

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 The year is 1807, the French Empire is at the pinnacle of its power. Although not yet 38 years of age the Emperor Napoleon Bonaparte is marching towards the heights of his military career. It is the anniversary of his great victory against the Austrians at Marengo seven years before. Since then the soldiers of The Grand Armee have faithfully followed The Little Corporal from victory to victory across Europe.  Now, in eastern Prussia, the Russians alone are holding out against the might of France. Bennigsens army is strung out on a four mile front along the banks of the river Alle, near the town of Friedland. With their backs to the unfordable river the brave Russian soldiers are drawn up in a poor position to give battle.  It is already midday when Napoleon arrives on the field. Much of the French force is still some miles away but the commanders keen eye immediately perceives an opportunity for victory. He decides to attack. The vigourous assault on the Russian lines commences at about 5.30 pm. Bennigsen, anticipating an engagement on the following day, is completely surprised by this ferocious attack so late in the afternoon. The fighting begins as his divisions are preparing to withdraw across the river Alle, to a stronger position. Napoleons master stroke throws the enemy into confusion. By 8.30 pm the French are masters of the field, the Russians have lost nearly a third of their army and 80 cannons. The town of Friedland is ablaze and the Tsars army in full retreat.  In simple attire and characteristically astride a nimble arab grey, Napoleon Bonaparte rides forward with his reserves of the Guard to survey the final victory.  Within a few days the defeated Tsar Alexander will embrace the French Emperor on a raft anchored in the middle of the Niemen at Tilsit. At their monumental meeting they will talk of peace, co-operation against the British, the division of Prussian Territories and France with Russia will form their uneasy alliance that will quickly collapse into open hostility and present Napoleon with his greatest challenge: The invasion of Russia itself.

Napoleon at Friedland by Mark Churms. (AP)
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At 12.30pm on the 21st of October 1805, Admiral Lord Nelson on board his flagship, HMS Victory, breaks the line of the combined French and Spanish fleets.  The Victory is delivering a devastating stern rake to the 80 gun French ship Bucentaure, the flagship of the combined fleets, commanded by Vice-Admiral P. C. J. B. S. Villeneuve.  Starboard to the Victory is the 74 gun Redoutable.  This ship, the Victory and HMS Temeraire, seen left, became locked together soon after, the unequal exchange resulting in the Redoutable having the highest casualties during the entire battle.

Breaking the Line at the Battle of Trafalgar by Graeme Lothian. (AP)
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 French dragoons attack a Spanish farmhouse where they believe Spanish guerillas are hiding.

La Gueper Espagnol by Mark Churms. (Y)
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 Taking over command of the British Northern Army in 1777, Lt Gen Burgoyne began a march to Albany to join forces with Lt Gen Sir William Howe.  After taking Fort Ticonderoga on route he learned that Howe was leaving for Pennsylvania.  Becoming desperately short on supplies he decided to press on the Albany regardless but found the road blocked by a Continental army under Maj Gen Horatio Gates.  Burgoyne decided not to engage the enemys position frontally but to turn their left at Freemans Farm.  After a day of fierce fighting the British held the field but at a heavy price in casualties.  On the 7th October the Colonial army, after receiving continual reinforcements attacked Howes position (the battle became known as Bemis Heights) and he was forced to retire to Saratoga.

The 9th Regiment, at the Battle of Freemans Farm, September 19th 1777 by Brian Palmer
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DHM927P.  William F Cody (Buffalo Bill) by Brian Palmer.

William F Cody (Buffalo Bill) by Brian Palmer. (P)
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 On the 6th November 1792 Dumouriez defeated the Austrians under the Duke of Saxe Teshen and Clerfayt at Jemappes, near Mons. This led to the French Occupation of Belgium.
The Battle of Jemappes by Horace Vernet (Y)
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 The painting shows a gun team of the Royal Horse Artillery with wounded soldiers on the Limber during the retreat to Corunna in the winter of 1808-1809, during the Peninsula War.

Halt on a Forced March by Lady Elizabeth Butler. (Y)
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 One of the last cavalry charges in British Military history, 8th November 1917.

The Charge of the Warwickshire and Worcestershire Yeomanry at Huj by Lady Elizabeth Butler. (Y)
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SPORT PRINTS

Click above to see all of our sport art index - Eight random half price sport items are displayed to the right.

Some Current Half Price Sport Art Offers

 Celebrating Englands 1980 Five Nations Grand Slam. After the 70s had been dominated by the Welsh, England battled through an exceptionally tough campaign to win their first Grand Slam in 23 years.

1980 Grand Slam by James Owen. (Y)
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MC0041P. Blitzkrieg by Mark Churms.

Blitzkrieg by Mark Churms. (P)
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 It was Saturday 4th May 2002, the Millennium Stadium in Cardiff.  Wonderful goals by Ray Parlour and Freddie Ljungberg for Arsenal were too much for their London rivals Chelsea to capture the FA Cup.  Four days later, on Wednesday 8th, Arsenal rode into Old Trafford.  This time a goal by Sylvain Wiltord on his 100th appearance for the club was enough for Arsene Wenger's team to overcome Manchester United and clinch the Premiership title, maintaining a record of scoring in every league game of the season.  For the second time in four years under their long-serving and inspirational captain Tony Adams, Arsenal had performed the classic double of English football, the third in their history making 2001-02, a season never to be forgotten.

The Double 2001 / 2002 by Gary Keane. (Y)
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 Marlboro McLaren Mercedes MP4/11. 1996.
David Coulthard by Michael Thompson.
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SFA7.  Galileo by Stephen Smith.

Galileo by Stephen Smith.
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Marcus Gronholm wins the 2002 Rally New Zealand in the Peugeot 206 and gains the World Rally Championship Title, October 2002.
Finnish First by Graham Bosworth. (Y)
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 The Intercontinental Formula was first organised by British Racing Drivers Club to allow the racing of cars with 2000cc to 3000cc engines. At the time the 1500cc limit of Formula 1 had been instituted by the international ruling body in the belief that the smaller cars would mean safer racing. In reality this meant that the relatively easy to handle Formula 1 cars could be driven by less experienced drivers almost as fast as the most experienced master drivers. The result was that the car with fractionally more power was the deciding factor in winning the race, rather than the better driver but this also compromised track safety. The introduction of the Intercontinental Formula was seen as more of a challenge for the drivers, with the larger and more powerful cars requiring greater skill and experience than to drive the 1500cc cars of Formula 1. The 13th International Trophy on Saturday 6th May 1961 was the first race of the season to carry World Championship points and consisted of 80 laps of Silverstone, a total of 233 miles. Stirling Moss, having already won the International Sports Car Race in a Lotus earlier that day, was driving Rob Walkers 2.5 litre Cooper Climax and qualified 2nd on the grid despite being unhappy with the steering of his car. The starting grid front row was Bruce McLaren, Stirling Moss, Jack Brabham and Graham Hill and by the time the race started at 2.30pm a heavy rain meant that the track was not only soaked but also covered in oil and rubber from the previous races. World Champion Jack Brabham made a superb start, passed Moss and was first into Copse and by lap 4 Moss was in 3rd place led by Surtees and Brabham. Due to appalling conditions and poor visibility many of the cars were spinning or leaving the track and by lap 13 Brabham and Moss were 1st and 2nd with the rest of the field some distance behind. Moss now poured on the pressure and for the next few laps he tried to pass as he harried Brabham in a duel for the lead. The pair were now beginning to lap the tailenders and, at around a quarter of the distance Moss was held up by Flockhart, Brabhams team member, who had allowed Brabham to pass. Moss gestured angrily to Flockhart as he was unable to follow Brabham and, as the rain paused for a while the pace became faster. Suddenly and quite dramatically Moss passed both Flockhart and Brabham and within 2 laps had gained 5 seconds on the World Champion. As the rain returned in a deluge Moss mercilessly pushed on, increasing his lead to 1.5 minutes by the halfway mark. Although he could have taken things easily at this point Moss drove on relentlessly at a seemingly impossible pace and was now lapping most of the field for a second time. By the ¾ stage he completed his humiliation of Brabham by passing him for a second time to lap him representing a 3 mile lead. Moss eventually won the race in 2hrs 41 mins 19.2 secs, 1.5 laps ahead of Brabham and at least two laps ahead of the rest of the field in what were treacherous conditions. At the end of the race Moss summed up the experience as a nice ride, having proved himself to be one of the greatest and fastest drivers in the world under any conditions. Sir Stirling Moss believes this to be one of his finest ever drives.

A Moment of Triumph by Gerald Coulson. (Y)
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22nd - 24th September 1995, Oakhill Country Club, Rochester, New York.  Against all odds the triumphant European team beat the USA in one of the most dramatic finishes of all time, to bring home the Ryder Cup for Europe.
Ryder Cup Victors by Peter Wileman
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